Customer Reviews


51 Reviews
5 star:
 (45)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good album, even better remastered
In 1981 Steel Pulse was practically bankrupcy without any money at all.

They managed to get some free of charge studio time in a small recording studio in Denmark to make this album.

The result was one of their best albums of all time.

Now a better sounding remaster is out adding 4 new extended previously unavailable tracks to this...
Published on August 8, 2005 by Tom

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality vinyl.
Poor quality vinyl. Your better off buying the mp3/cd. Lots of skipping. Sounds more like a scratched CD than a quality piece of vinyl. Please don't get me wrong, one of my favorite Steel Pulse albums. Still a poor vinyl pressing.
Published 1 month ago by Eddie


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars #4. The Top 100 Albums in Reggae Music: A Critical Review, February 22, 2011
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
"In your hands lie your destination/
The book of true life, you hold the key/
Mystical powers to you unfold/
Seek ye the half that has never been told...."
-- Chant A Psalm

The first two albums on this list share the distinction of genre-defying, crossover success and as such I awarded them the top spots as an honorarium. However, the next five albums can easily be considered the "greatest reggae album" of all time on artistic merits alone.

For the music industry, 1982 signaled a change from the usual. I remember it well as that September was the beginning of my senior year at Uniondale High School (NY). It was also a time where we saw a new group of rap artist emerge as groups like Grandmaster Flash, Sugarhill Gang, Kurtis Blow, Spoonie Gee and The Cold Crush Bros., were not only competing against each other but also the expectation that they could produce more than just the occasional hit singles. Back in the day, there were any "budgets" to talk about. It was all about ingenuity and love of the art. "Do you believe you have what it takes?" Right around the corner, Run DMC and LL Cool J (both from Queens) were making a lot noise with their sound. Things were about to get interesting!

Up in the Northwest, Prince, the musical prodigy, had firmly established himself as a solo musician and created a very competent (and complicit) backing band. The Time, the sophistical counterpart to his royal badness, were themselves experience a change of leaders as Alexander O'Neal was replaced by Morris Day.

Back in the Northeast, Rick James was...was Cold Blooded! He was just finishing the 3 of three spectacular albums following Street Songs and Throwin' Down. He also had new albums by the Stone City Band and THE girl group of that time The Mary Jane Girls . But, the spotlight directly beside the King of Punk Funk belonged to The Queen of Ivory Soul, herself, Teena Marie.

And, last but certainly not least, Quincy Jones walked in Epic Studio with the master tapes of what would be the-biggest-selling-album of all time.

But something else happened in 1982. Something quite different, something no one was expecting. Not of Shakespearean proportion but it did happen in Denmark.

David Hinds, lead singer and writer for Steel Pulse received a call from Karl Pitterson. Apparently, a new recording studio had just opened in Denmark and the owner was a huge reggae fan. He was interested in knowing if there was a reggae group interested in recording there.

Hinds and the band had just severed ties with Island Records in what both sides say was not an amicable parting. Hinds and the guys wanted to take their music in a new direction, broadly speaking. Marley had departed two years prior. And, with no one offering a broad palate, the record industry was doubtful it (the genre) would continue. Black Uhuru's work was far too militant to make it popular. Burning Spear' work was not yet seen as broadly marketable. Third World's music was becoming more homogenized by the second (and losing credibility amongst true reggae fans). That left Bunny Wailer (who had a notorious reputation for not liking to tour, thereby seen as a high financial risk) and Peter Tosh, who although still showed signs of genius, Legalize It, was still seen as a live-wire, both politically and legally.

Who else was left? The Melody Makers? Musical Youth? Too young. UB40 and Aswad were still a couple of years away from breakout status. This left Steel Pulse: spiritual heir to Marley, but without a label.

Although all of the major record labels considered reggae a niche and perhaps even a fad, they did sign Steel Pulse to a record deal. Their first recording being a 4-song set on the classic album, Reggae Sunsplash 81: Tribute to Marley. It still boggles my mind that a group that had Marley and Burning Spear as their opening act and they themselves had, the little-known act, The Police as their opening act across Europe were given a shoe-string budget to prove the industry wrong.

Yes, Steel Pulse was off to Denmark.

Over the course of a couple of months, the band would cut 10-tracks of various themes from slow ("Your House") to up-tempo ("Blues Dance Raid"). From social commentary--"A Who Responsible," "Man No Sober," "Leggo Beast" - to Steel Pulse's mystical tribute to Marley's "Natural Mystic" with "Chant A Psalm."

This album is like no other and it ushered in a standard that with the possible exception of their follow-up, Earth Crisis, they have never been able to recapture the magic.

"Out of darkness, out of night/
People screaming, baton wheeling/
A lot of bleeding, bruised feelings

Search warrant for their outvitation/
Walkie talkie reinforcement/
From dem pocket they draw handcuff/
(Dis ya session it rough!)
----"Blues Dance Raid

True Democracy. The #4 Greatest Reggae Album of All Time and possibly #1 when the mood strikes you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CEE, August 29, 2009
This review is from: True Democracy (US Release) (MP3 Music)
THIS ALBUM IS A CLASSIC, PERIOD. IT IS AMONG THE BEST FIVE REGGAE ALBUMS OF ALL TIMES. BOB MARLEY USED TO SING SONGS FROM THIS GROUP ON HIS TOUR. NOW WHAT DOES THAT TELL YOU. IT'S A SHAME THAT THEY HAVEN'T ATTAIN THE SUCCESS (SELLING MORE ALBUMS) THEY DESERVE. GO GET THE ALBUM, YOU'RE MISSING OUT ON SOME EXCELLENT MUSIC.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We need albums like this one, to have True Democracy., September 9, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
Needless to say this is the most inspiring album of Steel Pulse. It's just a matter of hearing the powerfull lyrics to know what Roots Reggae is all about. Besides having wonderful songs, what really stays in your mind is the message they bring to you, wether you are a Reggae fan or not. Sit down, relax and enjoy the journey. Jah Bless.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorite Reggae Album, March 25, 2003
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
This will be the third copy of this CD I have bought. My others have been lent out never to be returned - with good reason. I never get tired of this CD. Whenever I want to get into a good mood I put this on. The best of Steel Pulse for sure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Reggae Albums of all time, January 31, 2001
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
Steel Pulse mix excellent vocals and spectacular songwriting together. This album rivals anything that Bob Marley did. A must for all roots and culture reggae fans
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 5 Stars For Album, 5 For Their "CHANT A PSALM"!..., March 5, 2006
By 
Will Alston (BALTIMORE, MARYLAND USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
...5 Stars for a charmed and velveteen, lush, and sincere vocal lead, and sweetly stellar backing harmonies unlike ANY other group!These dudes are REAL! They are greatly accomplished instrumentalists with lyrics that go far beyond pen & paper and reggae beats & microphones. There is a 'life-deepness' inherent in Steel Pulse' words and catchy hooks; whether they be light-heartedly touched with a sense of wit and/or humor, serious topics, or spiritual beauty. I hope this Steel Pulse cd album will spur you to explore their many other great recordings. Warning: You may discover a music group that has more than just nice songs; these are humanitarians with notes of intelligence and social responsibility.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I WANNA KNOW A HOW YA FEELIN...IRIE?, February 11, 2000
By 
Morado (cincinnati, ohio USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
Timeless reggae, classic Pulse, man this is a great CD! Intelligent, inspirational, angry: There are so many words to describe all the songs. I loved "Chant A Psalm," "Ravers," "Worth His Weight In Gold." I especially liked "Your House"(which I've never seen them play live), and "Blues Dance Raid," which is like a Rastafari Anthem. One thing I love about Steel Pulse is their lyrics. They tell history the way it happened, not the watered down "whitened" version we all seem to have learned. In some regards this has made them controversial. But truth speaks volumes...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I love steel pulse and I'm glad I could support by ..., July 10, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
Every song is a hit. I love steel pulse and I'm glad I could support by actually purchasing their amazing music.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars great album, February 17, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: True Democracy (US Release) (MP3 Music)
love this album and it has many fantastic singles make it worth it just for one of the singles but there are at least 5
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars legendary!!!!, December 29, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: True Democracy (Audio CD)
the rydim section is the best scince the mighty wailers. david hines has krazy vocal range. songs are well written and well arranged musically. now I see why bob marley himself gave this group his endorsement.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.