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True Grit
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on December 22, 2010
It is a gross oversight by the Academy that Mr. Burwell has not been decorated with dozens of Oscar statues. And he won't be decorated for this score due to the Academy disqualifying it because too much of it isn't original material. Poppycock, I say. Never have Leaning On The Everlasting Arms or the other hymns he uses here sounded so beautiful, so epic, or so truthful. Okay, maybe in Night of the Hunter, but that's an entirely different context and application. Like all great scores, it elevates its film to heights it would not have otherwise accomplished. It swells in all the right places, it's never overpowering. I may be on a True Grit high right now having just gotten back from seeing it in theaters, but I feel this is the best work Mr. Burwell has done and one of the best western film scores ever. It is a shame we won't get to see him and Mr. Reznor face off at the Oscars next year but I have a feeling this score will get loads of recognition anyway.
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54 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on December 24, 2010
While the music on this CD is pleasent enough I have to whine about the non-inclusion of the short vocal piece heard during the closing credits. What alcoholic made that decision? Perhaps they felt it did not fit the mood. Well tough! Okay, can I go now?

Okay, I'm back and boy am I angry. You can get the Iris DeMent vocal, LEANING ON THE EVERLASTING ARMS if you buy the soundtrack from I-Tunes. But not on the CD that I bought at the store. What is wrong with these people. Anyway, don't buy the soundtrack version. Buy the Lifeline version. It is an entire minute longer. May the bird of paradise fly up someone's nose.
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76 of 92 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2010
True Grit is the latest film from Joel and Ethan Coen, the writing-directing-producing brothers who brought us such classic movies as Fargo, The Big Lebowski, O Brother Where Art Thou and No Country For Old Men. True Grit is a new version of the well-respected 1968 novel by Charles Portis which chronicles the adventures of grizzled marshal Rooster Cogburn at the end of the Wild West era in the 1920s, who is hired by 14-year-old Mattie Ross to track down the drifter who murdered her father. John Wayne won his first and only Best Actor Oscar for his performance as Cogburn in the original 1969 version of the story. This time around, the cast features Jeff Bridges in the leading role, Matt Damon and Josh Brolin in supporting roles, and an original score from the Coens' regular composer, Carter Burwell.

It's been well documented over the years that, for whatever reason, I have never truly `got' Carter Burwell's music. The scores of his that I do like - Fargo, Gods and Monsters, Kinsey, Rob Roy, The Hi-Lo Country amongst them - tend to be more conventional than his others, with a stronger melodic content and a more emotional resonance. Unfortunately, and from my point of view, far too much Burwell's music gets lost in a sea of bass, where the grinding underbelly of the orchestra comes across as the dominant sound, and the thematic content gets drowned out. It has to be something to do with the key in which Burwell often writes, or the chord progressions he uses - I can't fully explain it - but the net result is generally the same: a lack of connection between me and the music.

True Grit is slightly different. For this score, Burwell took the unusual decision to base virtually all his thematic content on arrangements of traditional protestant hymns, most prominently the 1877 hymn "Leaning on the Everlasting Arms", as well as "The Gloryland Way" and "What A Friend We Have in Jesus". Burwell and the Coens discussed the idea of using 19th-century church music for the entire score as a reflection of the lead character's religious convictions, "something that couldn't be soothing or uplifting, but at the same time it couldn't be outwardly depressing", before eventually settling on the compromise between original score and hymn arrangements we hear on the final soundtrack.

Using these hymns as a frame of reference, the entire score can almost be seen as a reflection of Mattie's religious convictions and her journey of sadness, revenge and redemption in the company of Cogburn to seek justice for her murdered father. The Everlasting Arms theme is almost a leitmotif for Mattie, while the Gloryland Way invokes Cogburn and his old-fashioned connection with a land swiftly disappearing under the tide of modern progress. It's a clever idea which results in a soundtrack album which, superficially at least, is among the most enjoyable Burwell works in quite a while, but whether this can truly be called a "Carter Burwell score" is up for debate.

The orchestrations are very clearly inspired by the familiar Old West orchestrations from classic Hollywood, but are filtered through Burwell's slightly darker and more introspective personality, again with the familiar chord progressions and bass-heavy instrumental clusters he has used throughout his career. Burwell isn't a composer given to large-scale statements of orchestral beauty, and he doesn't change his modus operandi very much here, although like The Hi-Lo Country before it, he does allow his music to present brief reflections of majestic Western landscapes which really open up the score.

The Everlasting Arms melody forms the core of the majority of cues. The opening cue, "The Wicked Flee", is a straightforward performance of the theme on a solo piano that gradually picks up a warmer and broader orchestral accompaniment in "Father's Gun". In "Little Blackie" it is performed on an upright honky-tonk style piano with a cowboy flavor, while in "Your Headstrong Ways" it features a playful clarinet refrain and a vaguely mischievous sensibility, clearly alluding to Mattie's youth and naïve persistence.

In "We Don't Need Him Do We?" the theme takes on a darker aspect, and in "The Hanging Man" the clarinet returns, although this time the instrument clearly alludes to something a little more somber and thoughtful. Later, "La Boeuf Takes Leave" is almost romantic in the way the theme is softly arranged for tender strings, gentle woodwinds and a poignant piano, while "One Against Four" contains a whole host of unexpectedly heroic trumpet fanfares based on the Everlasting Arms motif which gradually give way to a stark, bitter deconstructed piano variation. "Ride to Death" takes the Everlasting Arms theme and turns it into a bittersweet elegy which is quite lovely, while in the conclusive "The Grave" the Everlasting Arms theme returns to its more stripped-down roots with a solemn solo piano performance to bring the album to a close.

The other main melody - the Gloryland Way theme - forms the core of "A Great Adventure" and the excellent "River Crossing", in which Burwell allows the theme to emerge into a large-scale full-orchestral performance of which Elmer Bernstein might have been proud. "River Crossing" especially features some uncharacteristically bold string rhythms under the melody which are quite superb. This theme reoccurs just once again in the score, in "I Will Carry You", where it is re-orchestrated for oboe, guitar and strings, and as such takes on a much more serious feeling. The other hymn to feature in the score, What a Friend We Have in Jesus, appears just once, performed on solo piano in the penultimate cue, "A Quarter Century".

There are only one or two extended pieces of music that contain virtually none of the score's hymn-based thematic content. The longest of these, "A Turkey Shoot", is a nervous pseudo-action piece filled with rattling wooden percussion, rumbling timpanis and string dissonances that create a great deal of tension and mystery. Similarly, "Taken Hostage" has a stirring militaristic snare-drum lick under a more strident brass section that is quite exciting in comparison to the rest of the score.

One has to applaud Burwell and the Coens for taking this rather unique approach to their score, and as I mentioned before the album listening experience of this score is certainly one of the more entertaining records Burwell has put out for quite some time, but you still have to remember that this is not really a `Carter Burwell score'. For better or worse, it's an album of hymns arranged for a orchestra with an emphasis on the musical conventions of the Old West, and it is for this reason that the score fell foul of the Academy's rules about scores being based on pre-existing music, and was declared ineligible for the 2010 Oscars. If you don't mind the fact that none of the main themes are Burwell's own creations, then True Grit might be a worthwhile purchase, but bear in mind that the score is still very low-key in its style and understated in its thematic statements, and as such is unlikely to appeal to those who don't appreciate a great deal of subtlety in their music.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on December 31, 2010
It pains me to point out that the track titles listed here for the True Grit soundtrack are wrong, and will be wrong when you download them. The record company is working to fix this, but the titles have been wrong for more than a week and I feel obligated to point this out. If you download the entire album you will have all the music from the soundtrack, but you will have the wrong titles. This is easy to fix. I've given a list of the correct titles below.

One way to know that you have the wrong titles is to listen to the track titled "River Crossing". It is a rousing piece, playing the scene when Mattie rides her horse across the river. If you hear a slow, somewhat mournful piece instead, then you have the wrong titles.

You can also hear excerpts from the tracks, with the correct titles, at my web page:
[..]

The correct titles are:

1. The Wicked Flee
2. LaBoeuf Takes Leave
3. Little Blackie
4. River Crossing
5. The Hanging Man
6. Talk About Suffering
7. Your Headstrong Ways
8. A Great Adventure
9. We Don't Need Him Do We?
10. Father's Gun
11. A Methodist and a Son of a Bitch
12. Talking to Horses
13. A Turkey Shoot
14. Taken Hostage
15. One Against Four
16. The Snake Pit
17. Ride To Death
18. I Will Carry You
19. A Quarter Century
20. The Grave

When this problem has been corrected I'll note it here.

Carter Burwell
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 19, 2011
The Coen Bros have crafted yet another very fine film which is augmented by Burwell's score which fits in well with the low key, somber mood of this film. In fact, it's one of the reasons I'd like to see this film again.

I saw the original "True Grit" in its original release -- it's a brilliant gem of a film with an excellent score by Berstein. Film-making has changed tremendously since 1969 but the original still plays very well indeed and I recommend it highly.

The Coen Bros film stands on its own as does the Burwell score. The score fits the film like a hand in glove. It's a beautiful work, largely based on 19th century hymns that reflect the times and the world of Maddie Ross -- after all, this is her story. And every now and then, true Burwell comes through seamlessly to punctuate a scene as needed to lift it above the rest. Listen to the samples here to catch the flavor of the Burwell score -- it feels somber, somewhat reminiscent of his score for "The Man Who Wasn't There". But again, it fits the film and, IMHO, is a *very* fine score.

Having said that, my rating is based on what's here on disc, not what isn't.

So now my pet peeve -- O Iris, Where Art Thou? Why the Iris DeMint track -- Leaning On The Everlasting Arms (True Grit Version) -- was excluded from the CD is a mystery. Usually I don't care for songs tacked on the end credits but here it fit in so well that it's a real shame, a major disgrace, that it is *excluded* from the official soundtrack CD release. What were they thinking? And, yes, it's available if you purchase as a sonically challenged downloadable mp3 but why not include the DeMint track on the CD release? This makes no sense. First we get charged for the incomplete official CD release and then again to complete the CD! Then we can copy all the tracks to our own single CD to hear it all. And companies wonder why CD sales have slumped? End of pet peeve.

Another issue would be lack of music. What we have here is a half hour from a two hour film. Although the film was not scored wall-to-wall, what we have here feels short. Adding the end credit music would have extended the play time, summed up the score as a whole and wrapped up this album nicely.

And, in case you're wondering, the Johnny Cash tune from American V: A Hundred Highways that's used on the film's web site promo was not used in the film and is not here.

Bottom line: Carter Burwell's score is excellent and a keeper!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on September 9, 2012
I selected this item because it was listed when I had done a search in Music for Iris Dement. My memory of the movie soundtrack was that it was music which she would be very good singing, but I didn't specifically recall her doing it. When I got the CD, I was totally disappointed to find it is completely orchestral. It's well done, but is movie soundtrack music. There definitely are no vocals by Iris Dement (or anyone else), and she isn't mentioned anywhere in the liner notes. I am at a total loss as to why AMAZON.COM showed me this CD in the results for a search for Iris Dement. I feel completely ripped-off.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on February 13, 2011
Massively disappointed when the disc arrived; the supreme reason for buying the soundtrack is missing. Would not have considered buying it otherwise. Atmospheric arrangements throughout the movie surrounding "Leaning On the Everlasting Arms" and "What A Friend We Have In Jesus" notwithstanding, the stand-up, salute, rededicate-your-life-to-Jesus moment is simply missing: when Iris Dement - an original; an authentic - warbles the plaintiff, soul-searing-and-soaring vocal summation at the end. It's just not here. Whaaaa?

It's beyond me how a soundtrack album could omit this. Everything else on the soundtrack is derivative of this melody, this sentiment. Artistically so - and worthwhile... yet derivative. Why omit the source content?

Just a heads-up in case you were moved by the closing piece, the only vocal in the soundtrack, to buy the disc. Misleading, in my opinion, to call this a soundtrack album without it. If it were worth the time and effort to request a refund, I would.

Selah.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2011
I love this soundtrack, but am sorely disappointed that the song played during the credits is missing. That is what I was most looking forward to.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2011
Something's missing, and that's the rest of the score. Really, half a CD at full price? I think it's time Amazon started to print the durations of the CDs it sells. The music is pretty but it would have to be much better to be worth the inflated price. All who were responsible for this production should be ashamed ... but of course they're not.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on March 8, 2011
I don't think it's worth buying this soundtrack, given that Iris DeMent, who sings the most moving song of the entire film, is left off.
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