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3.7 out of 5 stars
True for You, But Not for Me: Overcoming Objections to Christian Faith
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Showing 1-10 of 10 reviews (1 star)show all reviews
on July 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
Oh, boy. Where to start? Copan asserts that his Biblical interpretation is correct, but the millions of others are wrong. Is salvation by works or faith? Is hell eternal torment or simply separation from god? Until and unless god comes down to make his will known to everyone, these arguments are, you guessed it, Copan's personal opinion.

Next is his distinction between science and scientism (the belief that only science can determine truth). Considering the epic failure of religions to prove their supernatural claims right (and which have always been superseded by scientific facts), we can expect science to continue to prove itself while religion goes by the wayside.

Moral judgments cannot be mandated from above. Fiat and fear are not reasons to believe morally. Anyone who refrains from evil or does good because an authority figure instructs them to is not behaving morally (by definition). Studies have shown that the common thread that connected people who saved Jews from Nazi oppression and murder during World War Two was not religion. It was compassion and a willingness to question and disobey authority. The Stanley-Millgram experiments have borne this out.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on July 10, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This would be Better for a college class. Not an easy read ! Academic style of writing. Not what I was expecting.
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16 of 48 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon October 24, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Copan provides a set of answers to questions regarding Christian faith; however, the questions he chooses to answer are among the least damaging objections to Christian faith.

With such an abundance of negativity and skepticism regarding Christian faith in this day and age, there is no shortage of objections and difficult questions that one has to deal with. Copan chose nothing of importance to answer; instead spending the bulk of the book dealing with predefined questions that hardly amount to any serious objections. One wonders if he is either unaware of current atheist and agnostic views toward Christianity or if he set himself up with Stawman questions to give the perception of a convincing book.

The bulk of the book deals with Christianity as opposed to relativism. Relativism, based on the notion that there is no objective truth, is easily shown as faulty logic by both atheists and Christians leaving one to wonder why Copan felt the need to put up such a defense. A lengthy rebuttal to relativism hardly represents the mainstream objections to Christianity leaving Copan's argument unnecessary.

Had Copan been willing to tackle questions regarding the issues with Biblical circular logic, certainty among Christian view as opposed to open mindedness of the agnostic view, emphasis on faith over critical thought, and many other pertinent questions, then he would have at least been on the right path. Regrettably he sidestepped these mainstream issues and provided at best a thin support for Christian faith. Many of his answers also contained no logical backing, such as his reasoning for why Jesus is greater than other leaders such as Buddha and Confucius SOLEY because Jesus made much more astonishing claims. If astonishing claims was all that was required for greatness than insane asylums would be filled with worldly figures. Any Christian expecting to answer objections to their faith using these lines of thought will find nothing but ridicule.

With so much discussion regarding religion from all perspectives, there is much to choose from. Copan's inability to take on real questions and back his answers with sound logic leave this book near the bottom, and one I would not waste time with if seeking to strengthen one's Christian views or better understand Christian faith.
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10 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on August 28, 2009
Format: Paperback
Copan takes objections to Christian ministry and gives a comeback involving why that person is in fact wrong. Examples include: "All religions are basically the same", "It's all a matter of perspective", "Who are you to impose your morality on others?" and so on.
Copan's argument is that people can't discredit Christianity because morals aren't relative, we all know what is right and wrong. Frequently, he goes so far as to suggest that believing Christianity is not real is similar to believing that the Holocaust never happened. He spends most of his book instructing the reader on how to use a person's argument against them and then to continue to push what that person doesn't want to hear. He is just as close minded as the people he is trying to "save" and in short this book is a hypocritical guide book for conversion, and is frankly embarrassing. I don't feel like I should spend time reviewing a book that completely negates itself from the first sentence.
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16 of 81 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
Paul Copan starts out with a very logical, persuasive essay showing that it is the agnostic humanists who control our society are the real narrow minded bigots. Some of the arguments are excellent and valuable in deflating the superiority status of this group.
By about page 80, however, Copan turns his cannons on Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses and other non-traditional mainline Christian groups.
By the end of the group, he has excluded everyone from Christendom who doesn't share his narrow, fundamentalist viewpoint, essentially proving the conclusion which he set out to disprove.
Very unfortunate that Copan feels Christians can still afford the luxury of fighting each other rather than putting their differences aside and pulling ranks together against the agnostic, humanistic establishment who threatens ALL Christians-- Catholics, JWs and Mormons included.
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19 of 105 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'm always astounded at the tendancy for christians to pretend that all people in the "WORLD" can be fit into one nice catagory. I'm not a believer but I'm not a subjectivist either. I certainly believe that an objective world exists. I'm also smart enough to realize that objective reality isn't found by believing "The substance of things hoped for and the evidence of things not seen.(Hebrews 11.1) Christians are nothing more than very selective subjectivists them selves. They need to deal with the log in there own eyes before dealing with the log in the eyes of relitivists and subjectivist they condem.
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6 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
In this book, Copan tries to "deflate" atheism by attacking holes in the philosophy of relativism. His logic, however, is twisted, flawed, and distorted, and he succeeds only in illuminating the sheer lunacy of religion--because in the end, it is impossible to employ logic to justify the irrationality of religon. To learn more about the philosophy of religion, read "In the Name of God" by Scott Smith.
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12 of 91 people found the following review helpful
on June 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
Anybody who only claims to deal in "absolutes" is either ignorant or a fraud.
Consider one simple example. "Absolutes" would dictate, that since Jesus said to give to anyone who asks, and to be perfect that therefore, I am entitled to ask any fundie to give me all their money.
Of course they won't- because of the internal inconsistencies in such thinking. And, few- especially those of the fundie stripe- will admit they're wrong; they'll say you're mocking God- oops! that's bearing false witness- that's a sin too...
So forget about books like this. They ignore very simple facts. Like the world's in color- NOT black and white.
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6 of 70 people found the following review helpful
on August 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
I used to consider myself a Christian. After this book, I'm embarrassed to call myself one. I don't want to use empty semantics to condemn others different from me just to make myself look better in comparison. This book has no heart.
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8 of 84 people found the following review helpful
on March 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
The logic in Copan's argument is missing, thus I find it hard to say that he is argueing anything, but rather, is speaking nonsense. The twisted logic is something most children would be able to pick up on. I'm sad that I couldn't select 0, or maybe even a negative, number of stars to rank this "work".
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