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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
I don't know if series author Ann M. Martin either personally has disabilities herself, and/or knows the real-life struggles of people who do, but this is an unflinchingly realistic account of what it is like to be a teenager with a disability in America. Years after reading it in a fourth grade English class, I remain impressed at the storyline candor.

Sure, there are laws on the books then protecting Stacey's access to education...etc but her real challenges come from insensitive peers. A friend had liked Stacey until she found out that Stacey had diabetes during a sleepover, and then ended their friendship abruptly. Having endured identical torturous experience for my own disability, I appreciate the unflinchingly honest (and even descriptively blunt) account of what this reality is like.

Likewise, the issue of well-meaning but over protective parents are brought up. Stacey's minor status is compounded by the fact that she is also a person with a disability. Rushing to 'help' her with something they do not personally themselves have, parental actions frustrate Stacey. She loves them dearly, but wants her life to be much more than hospitals and doctors---Stacey only wants to be a 'normal' kid.

Yes, this subject area might go beyond standard children's fare, but taking note of the human effects of discrimination and 'difference' are important. Even if they do not have disabilities themselves, young adults should read this book to realize that teasing other people because of their disability does hurt everybody.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 7, 1998
I've read the book, The Truth About Stacey, and I love it! There are two problems. The BSC are competing with another groups of babysitters who are older and can stay out later. (However, their not the best babysitters around.) And two: Stacey's parents are too overprotective about Stacey's diabeties and they practically drag her to every doctor in America, in hope of finding a cure. Stacey's got to prove two things. One: The BSC give better service than the other club, and two: she can take care of herself very well, and is already getting plenty of help. The ending? Read and find out!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Having diabetes is the worst thing imaginable, according to Stacey McGill. Her parents treat her like a child. The hospital stays and doctor visits make her miss school a lot, and she loses most of her friends due to them either getting mad that she's not spending any time with them or the fact that they think she's too sick.

When Stacey moves to Stoneybrook, she meets Claudia, Kristy, and Mary Anne. When they invite her to join the Baby-sitters Club, she's thrilled! She's afraid, however, that when they find out about her diabetes they won't want to be friends with her anymore.

Things become troublesome for the four when rivals come into town called the Babysitters Agency. With the Agency's ability to do late-night hours and having more babysitters, the Baby-sitters Club is worried that they'll have to close up shop.

Stacey's plate gets even more full when she starts having to make frequent trips to New York City. With all babysitters needed "on deck" to battle the rivals, Stacey's absences start getting noticed by Kristy and the others. How long will Stacey be able to keep her secret a secret? What will happen when her new friends figure out the truth?

A fun, quick story that does a great job of developing Stacey in this series. The author does a great job of balancing Stacey's internal and external problems. The plot is well-done, and the characters are likable. Readers who like realistic fiction, stories about New York, and tales about friendship will enjoy THE TRUTH ABOUT STACEY.

Reviewed by: Kira M
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 1998
The Truth About Stacey is a really good book. I have it and I read it very, very, very often. This book is about when competition comes to town. I just love books with competition. The BSC discovers another group of older baby-sitters that can stay out later than they do, and have lots and lots of choices for you to chose from. Stacey's parents are kind of a problem too. Their number one mission in life--help Stacey, has gotten way out of hand. They believe that there is a cure for Stacey's diaease and they praticaly drag her to every doctor in America. Stacey is sure that she can prove two things to everyone: One, the BSC is a better survice then the other group of baby-sitters, and two, she can take care of herself and that she already has the best help that she can get for her disease. Now, all she has to do is prove them. How? Read this exciting book and join them to discover the answers!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on May 9, 2006
Although I enjoy all of the books in the BSC series for their entertainment value, as someone who was diagnosed with type 1 Diabetes (like Stacey) at the age of 7, I have to say that Ann M Martin's portrayl of/research on the subject of diabetes leaves a lot to be desired. I was living with the disease at the same time as this book was written and even then the information she presents was outdated, over-generalized and in some cases just blatantly wrong. Read the book because its fun, don't base your knowledge of diabetes on it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 14, 2006
I love the BSC, and the earliest books in the series are my favorites. Ann Martin is one heck of a writer, and this third book in the BSC series tackles some serious issues - Stacey's struggles with diabetes, moving to a new town and fitting in, the loss and re-gain of old friends. A subplot in this book is the girls dealing with a copycat club called the Baby-Sitters Agency that threatens to put them out of business.

Ann, I wish you had written every single book in the series and not used ghostwriters for so many of them!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Back then when this book came out, people didn't know much about diabetes. Heck, when I read this book I didn't even know there were two different types of diabetes. This book offers a bit of info on diabetes, but not much, as it's a kid's book and focuses more on Stacey's trying to hide it from her friends, but of course, the truth has to come out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 17, 2010
Synopsis: The Babysitters Club is having their regular meeting, talking about Mrs. Newton's pregnancy, when Janine, Claudia Kishi's sister comes in holding a paper. The paper turns out to be an advertisement of the new "Babysitters Agency", where the girls are 13 and up, and can babysit on weekdays and weekends till midnight, which is more than what the BSC offers. They decide to prank call the agency to get to know more about them. They find out that the agency has a list of numbers they can call, for which they get paid a commission. When the BSC realize that the agency is attracting more customer, they decide to try new tactics to get people's attention. From lowering their rates, to wearing embarrassing billboard signs in school, the girls try to think of every possible of beating the agency and attracting new customers. But when their regular clients stop calling, the girls realize that the Club is in big trouble. Can they find a way to beat the Agency at their own game?

Stacey McGill, another member of the club, also mentions her history on how her life was in New York, and how her best friend Laine Cummings started ignoring her after she found out that Stacey had a disease. One day, Stacey's mother tells her that she has scheduled Stacey for some tests in New York to a Dr. Barnes who supposedly does miracles on his TV show. Stacey thinks he is a hack and doesn't want to go to New York, but she doesn't know what to do. When she talks with Dr. Johanssen about Dr. Barnes, Dr. Johanssen confirms her suspicions. Can Stacey think of a way to convince her parents not to seriously consider Dr. Barnes as her doctor?

Review: I really liked this book in the series. I liked the fact that this book dealt with serious issues on diabetes, by providing an insight into it for younger readers, and how serious it can be. We get to read more about how Stacey's life was in New York with her old friends. The story also talks a little about how there are so many fraud doctors out there would think of eccentric ways and false promises to cure you, but their techniques need not necessarily work.

The second story of the BSC competing with the BSA was also very interesting to read. Some parts which I found very interesting were, when Kristy realizes what a terrible mistake she has made by hiring Janet and Leslie into their club, or when Kristy forces the girls to wear embarrassing billboards in school, and when Stacey thinks of her idea on how to beat the agency.

Overall, this was a nicely written book which had humor, competition, and even dealt with a serious issue for a young person's perspective.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2014
This is babysitter Stacey's first book, and the "truth about" her is that she has diabetes. This made me happy as a kid because I didn't see many books about preteens with diabetes, and my best friend had the same kind--requiring strict diet control and insulin shots. I didn't like that she was sort of so put off and grossed out by her own condition, but at the same time she was newly diagnosed and she was probably just coming to terms with it. I understood her confusion and sadness over not wanting to feel like she was really sick, and didn't like her parents being so overprotective. The only real complaint I have about Stacey is that her whole identity is kinda being diabetic and being from New York. But nuanced characters in middle-grade fiction aren't all that common.

The non-Stacey-centric plot of this book involves the babysitters having some competition. They're not sure how to compete with this other club of babysitters because they're older girls who can watch kids longer into the night and whatnot. But, conveniently, they all kinda turn out to be jerks who aren't as good at their jobs or as connected with the kids as the home team. I didn't like that they were all painted with that brush, and I didn't like that there was a really silly contest at the end picking and choosing stuff the babysitters were theoretically supposed to know about the neighborhood kids if they were actually good sitters.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 16, 2002
This is a great book where Stacey tells about diabetes and how she is on a special diet where she can't eat junk food. It is a very, very good book! If you want to find out more, read The Truth About Stacey!
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