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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 30, 1999
This album is very similar to the first Led Zeppelin album, and this is a compliment. It was released at the same time and the sound is in the same style. There is even one song that appears in both, "You Shook Me". The quality of the two records is very high. Beck plays very roughly, with a lot of energy and feeling. Ron Wood plays with fast fingers and sounds like John Paul Jones (who plays organ on "Ol'Man River"). Rod Stewart sings with his unique voice songs very different from the style he would go for in the future solo career - very interesting. The most admired tune by rock musicians, "Greensleeves", is here played beautifully in acoustic guitar by Jeff Beck alone. Nicky Hopkins also is here in two songs. Everyone who likes rock'n'roll must have this.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on October 20, 2003
Mere words cannot do this album justice. All the songs are excellent. The only one that's below average is the lackluster rearrangement of "Shapes Of Things. Jeff solos like wildfire on "Let Me Love You", "Blues Deluxe" and "Rock My Plimsoul", which is one of the most AWESOME blues songs ever recorded. The pounding bass and sensual vocals of Rod Stewart make it even better. "Morning Dew" and "Old Man River" are both haunting pieces of work that take one's breath away. "You Shook Me" is not quite as good as Zeppelin's version, although you can't really compare one to another. And "Greensleeves" is pure Heaven. The most beautiful, emotional notes to ever emanate from an acoustic guitar. It never ceases to amaze me. "Beck's Bolero" is a total trip, an otherworldly experience. I love it when Beck slows down and plays those oh so lovely notes at about 0:34 into the song. "Blues Deluxe" features some astounding piano from Nicky Hopkins and a BLISTERING solo from Jeff. And Stewart sounds simply kick-a** on "I Ain't Superstitious".
All in all, I would definitely recommend this album to any blues/rock lover. Jeff Beck is unreal, and this is his masterpiece. "Rock My Plimsoul" alone is worth the price of the album.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The reason why I bought this album several years ago is because I always heard comparisons with this Jeff Beck lineup and Led Zeppelin. Listen to this album and you will see why. I love both bands and that is probably why I love this album along with Beck-Ola. I immediately blamed Led Zeppelin for copying this after my first time listening. I did not want to but could not help it. I still do this day. I liked the Yardbirds the most when Beck was in charge. And I like this band as much as Led Zeppelin though I think they would have been better had they could have kept Ansley Dunbar on drums. This album rocks and is one of the most important albums in the 60s that contributed to heavy rock. Too bad this band did not get the attention Led Zeppelin,Cream,and Jimi Hendrix all had. Its every bit as good and even better in some places.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2003
This is one of my favorite albums ever. I stole if from my dad a few years back just to hear some good guitar work, and it has not been out of the cd player. It is not quite Led Zepplin, but it is great. Some of the best gutair and singing (Rod Stwert at his best) there is. All the songs are great. Just put it in and listen from begin to end. Note: have it loud.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HALL OF FAMEon November 7, 2002
Jeff Beck's long career as a solo artist has largely been one of unfulfilled promise. He's never quite managed to capitalize of his fantastic skill as a guitar player, in part because he neither sings, nor writes much of his own material. "Truth" is best of the late 60s albums Beck made with a [band] band that included Rod Stewart on vocals and Ron Wood on bass. Together they sound much like another blues based British heavy metal quartet that was just getting started at the time. In fact, a cover of Willie Dixon's blues standard "You Shook Me" appears both here and on Led Zeppelin's debut album. It's a wash as to which version is better: Zep's is the heavier of the two but Beck and company's version is more melodic.
Of the rest, plenty of the tracks stand out. The covers of "Shape of Things" and another Dixon tune "I Ain't Superstituous" are excellent, as are the Jimmy Page-penned "Beck's Bolero," "Let Me Love You" and Morning Dew." The short instrumental cover of the traditional tune "Greensleeves," however, shows off Beck at his most technically proficient but is a warning sign for the egomania that would ultimaetly serve to sidetrack his career.
Overall, a near-masterpiece that would be an excellent choice as the first Jeff Beck album in anyone's CD collection.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 22, 2005
I like the Jeff Beck-era Yardbirds the best, I like Rod Stewart's first four albums (which he did with Mickey Waller and Ron Wood) and I like Led Zeppelin. I listened to all of these before I got into Jeff Beck. Why do I mention these? Well, because they all connect back to Beck. This album is for anyone who is a fan of any of the above and is definitely a "guitar" album. Sure, Zeppelin and Clapton got all of the attention, but this is where it's at. I've listened to this album plenty of times and it still sounds fresh. It also helps that there aren't any hit singles off of it and the radio hasn't killed it.

The highlights? The very different but still great version of "Shapes Of Things," "Let Me Love You," "Morning Dew," "You Shook Me," "Beck's Bolero" (which you can hear bits of in Led Zeppelin's "How Many More Times"), and "I Ain't Superstitious."

Also, from a guitar player's stand point, this album is absolutely perfect. Beck's tone is spot on in almost every song and his playing is superb, but not overdone.

If you don't own this, you should.

A side note: It's really sad when people confuse Jeff Beck with Beck.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 20, 2011
"Truth" is one of those rare albums in my collection that I can listen from start to finish, and enjoy every song. The standout track is "I Ain't Superstitious" with Jeff Beck's biting guitar, Rod Stewart's growling vocals, and Micky Waller's thumping drums. Running a close second is a sublime version of "Ol' Man River," by Rod Stewart with his shimmering vocals punctuated by slashing guitar riffs from Jeff Beck, and backed by rumbling tympani played by an uncredited Keith Moon. Beck's playing shines on this album because he works with the band, rather than trying to dominate them. Rod's singing demonstrates why he has been labeled one of rock's finest vocalists. The bonus tracks offer an additional view into the band's early work. Two singles from the era featuring Beck's vocals are included, and he does a credible job of singing on "Tallyman" and "Hi Ho Silver Lining." As I wrote in my review of "Beck-Ola," the follow-up album to "Truth," if you are hoping for more of the same golden sound found on "Truth," you won't find it on "Beck-Ola," an album of loud, thrashing music. I instead recommend listening to "Truth" another time.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 11, 2000
This album, coupled when I bought it with "Beck-Ola," showcases Jeff Beck during his blues period. "Truth" is a wonderful bit of blues rock from the opening cover of the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things," to the closing cover of "I Ain't Superstitious," this album is great. Beck demonstrates his ability to deliver concise, cosmic, and utterly original solos throughout this blues excercise. There is no more original guitarist in rock's history save Hendrix, and even then I'd hate to have to live on the difference. Jeff Beck never received the commercial success of any of his peers, yet he also never played so over-the-top as Hendrix and Page have, preferring to dole out his brilliance in small doses. There is really no bad song on this album, and there are some really beautiful ones as well. His version of the classic "Greensleeves" should be standard guitar instruction for anyone and the mild hit "Beck's Bolero" (with an uncredited turn by Jimmy Page on bass) is another successful creative leap. The singing is provided by a young Rod Stewart and the bass (except "Bolero") is provided by Ron Wood. Most songs are blues based and the guitar work by Jeff Beck is superb. I urge you to buy this album and gain an understanding of why this guitarist is truly the greatest.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 2, 2012
I had the vinyl of this when it first came out. I don't remember it sounding this good. I had a cheap record player (all I could afford) but I knew it was special. Especially considering where these fellows came from, and how young they were. I didn't like Stewart's version of the blues at first but it grew on me. I had a lot of Ray Charles, Muddy Waters and other American blues masters and this seemed so alien at first. Zep hit not too long after this and all of it took off with the public in a big way. You know the story. This is on fire, well played and still sounds terrific. Every song is good. Stewart always liked to add a folk tune or two to all of his early albums. The apocalyptic "Morning Dew" is the Standout folk tune here. Beck does a great "Greensleeves" also.

Beck and Stewart were a great team.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2005
I think that this and "Beck-Ola" are great CDs and any lover of rock music should have these in their collection.

Led Zeppelin is usually mentioned because Jimmy Page became Beck's rival for years because he also used "You Shook Me" with Led Zeppelin, even though it's different. Page however does play on "Beck's Bolero" (which was used in part of "How Many More Times"). Because Led Zeppelin became THE band and their albums became instant classics, the Jeff Beck Group albums with Rod Stewart became "cult classics" in comparison (even though it sold well when it came out), yet don't think they're any lesser, and if anything, Jeff was able to branch into all types of styles after the band broke up. A lot of people who compare the "Yardbirds 3" (Beck, Page, and Clapton) will admit that Beck is the best of the three.

However, they missed out on playing Woodstock, Rod Stewart moved on to his own career as well as with the Faces, and Led Zeppelin's legacy overshadowed these albums for the most part, with the exception of Jeff Beck fans who keep trying to point these out.

The songs on here are great and the styles varied. These albums showcase Rod's voice, a young punk with a bluesman's voice. They start off in Yardbird territory with a reworked psyechedelic "Shapes of Things", but check out "I Ain't Superstitious" and Rod's take on "You Shook Me".

I've heard live tapes of this band (as well as seen clips of them) and the question is why those recordings aren't out on CD, either in a box set in its own right (and not part of Beck or Stewart's own box sets), as part of a "Deluxe Edition" or on DVD? The live recordings blow away the studio recordings.

Any lover of rock should have this one, and push Sony's Legacy and Jeff Beck into putting out a box set (they recorded a lot of the Fillmore shows and the BBC sessions) that celebrates a great band, long before JB did fusion and Rod got into hot pants or singing "It Had To Be You".
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