Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Truth in Religion: The Plurality of Religions and the Unity of Truth Paperback – April 1, 1992


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.56
$3.60 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Truth in Religion:  The Plurality of Religions and the Unity of Truth + How to Think About God: A Guide for the 20th-Century Pagan
Price for both: $27.82

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (April 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0020641400
  • ISBN-13: 978-0020641407
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 6.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #586,843 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this parochial, dogmatic essay, philosopher Adler ( Six Great Ideas ) argues that pluralism, while desirable in matters of taste, has no place in the realm of truth. Arguing that religious beliefs, even if beyond proof, ought to obey the logic of truth, he suggests that the major religions of the Far East foster cultural schizophrenia by compartmentalizing scientific facts and religious views. After determining that Eastern cosmological religions cannot be considered "logical and factual," Adler weighs the three monotheisms--Christianity, Judaism, Islam--and indecisively posits, "We can only say that one of these religions is truer than the other two." His skewerings of Joseph Campbell, of Protestant thinker Harvey Cox, and of Roman Catholic theologian Hans Kung add to the controversial nature of this devisive tract.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Distinguishing between matters of truth and taste, Adler examines the problem of truth in religion. He takes as his criterion the principle of noncontradiction. Those systems that accept a unitary logical coherence have the possibility of truth, while those that allow the existence of contradictory states of being at the same time are matters of taste, while the various Western monotheisms share the possibility of logical truth. Adler's arguments are provocative, but his understanding of Eastern thought is shallow, and he glosses over many problems in Western thought. In the final analysis, Adler begs more questions than he answers.
- T.L. Cooksey, Armstrong State Coll., Savannah, Ga.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 - June 28, 2001) was an American philosopher, educator, and popular author. As a philosopher he worked within the Aristotelian and Thomistic traditions. He lived for the longest stretches in New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, and San Mateo. He worked for Columbia University, the University of Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Adler's own Institute for Philosophical Research. Adler was married twice and had four children.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Trent Dougherty on September 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
It would be this one, without a doubt. First, though, I can't help but comment on the comical Publisher's Weekly review which calls the book "parochial," "dogmatic," "controversial," and "devisive." Apart from not being able to spell "divisive" the author of that review must find controversial the idea that an indicative proposition can't be both true and false at the same time and the same sense. Or is that the dogmatic point? One wonders if the reviewer thinks her charges true (and that's different than "wanders" for the Pub Weekly folks). Perhaps, consistent with subjectivism, the reviewer is just expressing her taste--I don't like truth-claims--just as she perhaps doesn't like spam and eggs. But then why does her expressing her opinion on the pages of Publisher's Weekly count as journalism, but Adler expressing his in a treatise count as dogmatism. Apparently "dogmatism" only applies to *unfashionable* opinions.

At any rate, the book is a crucial corrective to the sickness of our times: the subjectivisation of religion. Bring me a good atheist any day, but keep the subjectivism to yourself (it only seems appropriate, doesn't it?). This book has some really neat features including a nice little primer on logic. The main target is the likes of Joseph Campbell who defines a religion as a myth mistakenly believed to be true. (Try telling that to Thomas Aquinas Joe-Joe.) The key distinction the book is built upon is the distinction between Truth and Taste. When one makes a truth-claim, the claim is governed by the laws of logic. When one expresses a matter of taste one is only reporting facts about oneself (and trivial ones about the object of the statement). The key difference is this: when I say "Squash is gross" and you say "Squash is good" we aren't really disagreeing.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Paul Cogley on January 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book examines the world's major religions and the philosophical issue of unity of truth; that is, if something is true, anything that contradicts it must be false. Religion being the touchiest of subjects, this provocative book will inevitably rub some readers the wrong way. The list of potentially challenged readers would include believers of Eastern religions and those who hold that all the major religions are somehow equally valid and true.
Adler recalls that Arnold Toynbee once predicted that in the next millennium world government would come about, either by conquest or by federation, and would prosper only if a world cultural community emerged with an adopted universal religion. If Toynbee was correct, such a religion would likely be based on an as-yet-to-be-developed trancultural philosophical theology. Originally published in his 88th year, in this book Adler entered the ring to begin the dialogue. Open minded readers interested in the question of religion in a global world as well as the theologically-inclined will enjoy this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By T. Faranda on October 12, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mortimer Adler, the American philosopher and former Chairman of the board of editors for the Encyclopedia Britannica, was a very prolific writer and teacher. He died in 2001, at the age of 98, and was active until the very end of his life. He wrote this particular book when he was 88. As the Wikipedia encyclopedia says "Adler long strove to bring philosophy to the masses".

In this short (160 pages) book Adler investigates what it says in the title: Truth in Religion. The sub-title is "the plurality of religions and the unity of truth". Adler brings some elemental logic to the discussion. For example: while it is possible that no religion may contain the truth, it is a contradiction to hold that all religions contain the truth. This is because of the conflicting and contradictory views that different religions hold regarding God, the cosmos, and human nature, as well as about how human beings should conduct their lives.

Is religion a matter of taste, or a matter of truth? Adler makes the point that in matters of taste -I'm wearing a yellow shirt today, but maybe I look better in blue - there is no disputing (another way of saying it is "There's no accounting for taste"), but in questions of truth, we have to have recourse to the effort to reach agreement about what is true and false.

Adler offers very cogent critiques of Joseph Campbell (The Power of Myth) and theologian Hans Kung (Theology for the Third Millenium: an Ecumenical View). He's not impressed with the positions of either of them.

As he does in all of his books, Adler is very careful to lay out his arguments, and he offers many interesting insights. For example, on the issue of world peace, he makes the point that you can only have world peace if you have some sort of world government.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C.S. Chester-Belloc on December 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
When I read this book, I was already - perhaps only instinctively - one who recognized the incoherence of pluralism. Every time I heard some platitude about how "All roads lead to God," I knew that such comments were likely wishful thinking rather than conclusions based on evidence or logic.

As a Protestant, Adler's sound arguments were a bit uncomfortable. Familiar with several Protestant denominations, I recall sitting in my own service thinking, "Obviously, all of these denominations cannot be right." After all, there were differing views of baptism, communion, women leaders and other doctrines. My friends of various denominations assured me that, "It doesn't matter as long as you believe in Jesus." We were preaching Protestant Christian pluralism.

It was a little while longer before I was received into the Holy Catholic Church, but this book was what started the process.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?