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Tsunami! (Revised) (Latitude 20 Books) Paperback – October 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Series: Latitude 20 Books
  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press; 2 edition (October 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824819691
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824819699
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,574,835 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Twice as long, fully updated, and far more comprehensive [than the first edition]. . . . A deeper and wider treatment of the subject. The edition retains a mix of personalized information, scientific data, and history told in a style that satisfies both technical and lay readers."

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 6 customer reviews
Obviously, there is more work to be done!
Jill Malter
Still, with waves traveling up to 500 miles an hour, Hawaii has at best about six hours notice of a tsunami coming from the Aleutian islands.
Harry Eagar
The diagrams readily follow the text and greatly augment its understanding.
Jerald R Lovell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ellen McBride on July 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
This fascinating book is told from the perspectives of victims, observers and researchers. It gives vivid descriptions (Mrs. Ito floating out of her house on a screen) that are terse and exciting without being overblown. Some of the pictures, such as people running from the 1960 tsunami which struck Hilo, HI are simply amazing. Interspersed in the text, the authors also give a clear and concise summary, with charts, of the study of tsunamis. They describe the warning system currently in place - how an earthquake in Alaska creates a tsunami which takes approximately 5 hours to reach Hawii - and how it needs to be improved. Best of all, they describe how to recognize the signs of a tsunami and how to avoid becoming a victim. This book could easily give The Perfect Storm a run for it's money!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jerald R Lovell on February 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
The recent cataclysm in Southeast Asia points up a problem about which Pacific Ocean residents have long known; tsunamis or "tidal waves". This book is written by Dr. Walter Dudley, one of the chief experts on tsunamis, and on how to detect them, and protect against them.

The book is well-organized, highly readable for professional and lay persons alike, and is a valuable contribution to literature on this most important subject. The diagrams readily follow the text and greatly augment its understanding. The photographs are interesting, but average. However, tsunamis are not a subject in which photographs aid understanding to any real degree.

Dr. Dudley carefully examines the various causes of this phenomenon, including meteor strikes and landslides, matters which have only recently come to the attention of science. He explains the physics of the tsunami with a merciful absence of complex mathematical equations.

Considerable attention is devoted to the creation and development of the Pacific Tsunami Warning System, with specific reference being made to mistakes and corrections follwing each event. A very fine summary of each damaging Pacific tsunami over the last half of the 20th Century gives a excellent portrayal of the ever-present danger from such spasms of nature.

Looking to the future, Dr. Dudley urges continued education and refinement of the Warning System as the best way to avoid enormous human disaster from these waves. It is ironic that he counsels warning systems should be in place all over the world, since any large body of water is subject to such disturbances.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jill Malter on January 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
Now that there has been a huge disaster, with a tsunami off the coast of Sumatra in 2004, we may be interested in looking at a book about tsunamis, written in 1998.

This book boasts about the early warning system in Hawaii. And it tells about proposals to install real-time tsunami detectors to protect Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia, and much of the rest of the Pacific Ocean shores.

Dudley and Lee begin with a description of the tsunami of April 1, 1946. 48 minutes after the earthquake, a 100-foot high wave struck Unimak Island, Alaska. Hawaii was over 2300 miles from the site of the earthquake, but it was struck less than 5 hours later, and there was considerable damage. There is also a description of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Lisbon, Portugal in 1755, killing tens of thousands of people.

The book then describes how the complete lack of preparedness for the 1946 tsunami led to the development of an early warning system. This includes a "tsunami watch" and the use of the emergency broadcast system to warn everyone. And, of course, it includes predictions of wave arrival times at various places along the shores. In 1957, this system was tested when a 10-foot high tsunami from Alaska struck Hawaii. Hawaii's system was tested again in 1960, on the occasion of a very high magnitude earthquake in Chile (probably the largest earthquake in the world during the twentieth century). That generated a huge tsunami: those in Chile could have used an early warning of it! This tsunami was 35 feet high when it eventually struck Hilo, Hawaii. In 1964, the waves from the great Alaskan earthquake were less than a third that high when they reached Hawaii.
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