Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tulip Farms and Leper Colonies (American Poets Continuum) Paperback – November 1, 2001


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.27 $1.09

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Charles Harper Webb was born in Philadelphia, and grew up in Houston, Texas, where he learned to hunt, fish, play baseball, pick guitar. He worked for fifteen years as a professional rock singer/guitarist, and is now a licensed psychotherapist and Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: American Poets Continuum (Book 69)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: BOA Editions Ltd.; 1st edition (November 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1929918151
  • ISBN-13: 978-1929918157
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 5.8 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,964,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Willie Plaschke on August 7, 2013
Format: Paperback
There is much to be said for Charles Harper Webb, a poet slash practicing psychotherapist. However, there is just a bit less to be said for his poetry and this particular collection. While ultimately redeemable (and recommendable), some unattractive realities initially emerge:

After reading the first two sections of "Tulip Farms and Leper Colonies," I find that I still didn't know much about Charles Harper Webb, really. His use of language--chatty and descriptive--didn't give me a sense of what was at stake; his sterility and harmlessness fail to threaten the reader's past opinions. This inadequacy is heightened because most of the poems concern Webb's personal anecdotes and experiences which are fairly pedestrian--friends who have been fired, beggars passed on the way to work, odes to kitchen foods.

And Webb does like to chat. To begin a poem called "Birdcage," he writes, "Wrapped in blankets, it looks like a body humped in the bed / of my Toyota truck: a five-foot rusty iron bird cage / my fiancées garbageman won't take." This is just one example of his penchant for light prose. Webb missed the chance to replace `it looks like' with `it's'; `Toyota truck' with either just `Toyota' or `truck,' and gain concision and a more poetic diction. Another chatty line: "Webb, from Middle English webbe, weaver (as in the web / of my least favorite crawling thing)"...why not simply `spider'?

The positives begin to appear in the third section, in the poem "Congratulations, Charles H. Webb, You've Just Won Ten Million Dollars". This is the best poem in the collection, the best moment. It's here we realize that many of the poems prior to it, and to come, are acts of confession. In "Congratulations...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Olivas on December 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
Even when Charles Harper Webb's collection "Tulip Farms and Leper Colonies" confronts such difficult topics as death, aging parents and one's own mortality, it is difficult not to smile. Reading Webb's poems is like chatting with a good friend, one who always manages to see the good in life, one who knows just how to explain things. To call Webb accessible does not imply that what he does is simple. Too many poets rely on obfuscation to show that they are "serious" artists. Well, Webb is a serious artist. But he also tells it like it is (like a cleaned up Bukowski) in clear yet evocative language. Some of his poems are just outright funny such as "Yiddish for Goys" and "To Make My Countrymen Love Poetry." But even when funny, Webb speaks the truth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eve Dobkin on April 25, 2002
Format: Paperback
I find myself smiling when I read the poems of Charles Harper Webb. He has the ability to energize his work with wit, irony and in his latest--Tulip Farms and Leper Colonies--nostalgia and serious observation. Like Billie Collins, Webb's work is readily accessible, however it is uniquely his own. I can't imagine Collins writing Feeling Sorry for Myself or, for that matter, Congratulations, Charles H.Webb,, You've Just Won Ten Million Dollars. Webb just gets better and better..
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By kingfisher1031 on December 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book of poetry feels more like a volume of tall tales. From realistic post-modern roots, Webb takes his poems into hyperbolic/surrealistic directions. The reader is compelled to go along with the ruse, because his deadpan delivery makes fictional elements plausible; and because, ultimately, at its heart, this tome is relating dedicated life-earned wisdoms.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
As if that really mattered. Read this book and all others by Webb. I think you'll find it stands up just fine with Collin's work, and, rather than being derivative, the two poets complement eachother.
Enough!
Get a life!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again