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Tulku Mass Market Paperback


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Laurel Leaf (May 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440214890
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440214892
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,030,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

An attack in the dark, screams, burning huts...

Thirteen-year-old Theodore crouches under the trees. His father's Mission has been destroyed. His father is dead. Theodore is on his own, fleeing the Chinese rebels of the Boxer uprising.

Then Mrs Jones appears. A botanist, Mrs Jones is a feisty, aging, good-hearted woman who has an amazing (and eye-opening) vocabulary and who adopts Theodore into her band of travellers. Fleeing bandits, the group enters Tibet, where they meet the old Lama who rules a monastery. But when the Lama says they have been drawn to him by destiny, and insists that Theodore, Mrs Jones, and her young Chinese courier Lung hold the clue to the birth of the long-awaited Tulku, or reincarnated spiritual master, there seems to be no escape...

From the Inside Flap

An attack in the dark, screams, burning huts...



Thirteen-year-old Theodore crouches under the trees. His father's Mission has been destroyed. His father is dead. Theodore is on his own, fleeing the Chinese rebels of the Boxer uprising.



Then Mrs Jones appears. A botanist, Mrs Jones is a feisty, aging, good-hearted woman who has an amazing (and eye-opening) vocabulary and who adopts Theodore into her band of travellers. Fleeing bandits, the group enters Tibet, where they meet the old Lama who rules a monastery. But when the Lama says they have been drawn to him by destiny, and insists that Theodore, Mrs Jones, and her young Chinese courier Lung hold the clue to the birth of the long-awaited Tulku, or reincarnated spiritual master, there seems to be no escape...

More About the Author

Peter Dickinson was born in Africa, but raised and educated in England. From 1952 to 1969 he was on the editorial staff of the British satirical magazine, Punch, and since then has earned his living writing fiction of various kinds for adults and children.

Amongst many other awards, Peter Dickinson has been nine times short-listed for the prestigious British Carnegie medal for children's literature and was the first author to win it twice. He has won the Phoenix Award twice for "The Seventh Raven" and "Eva". He won the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for "Chance, Luck and Destiny". "Eva" and "A Bone from A Dry Sea" were ALA Notable Books and SLJ Best Books of the Year. "The Ropemaker" was awarded the Mythopoeic Award for Children's Literature and was a Michael L. Printz Honor Book. Peter's books for children have also been published in many languages throughout the world. His latest collection of short stories, "Earth and Air", was published in October and his latest novel, "In the Palace of the Khans" was published in November.

Peter Dickinson was the first author to win the British Crime-Writers Golden Dagger for two books running: Skin Deep (1968), and A Pride of Heroes (1969). He He has written twenty-one crime and mystery novels, which have been published in several languages.

He has been chairman of the UK Society of Authors and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. He was awarded an O.B.E. for services to literature in 2009.

Website: www.peterdickinson.com

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is not specifis information as to when exactly this story was set, but certain sections suggest that it was set in the late 1800s. At the beginning of the story, in China, the main character Theodore(or Theo)is all alonebecause his fundamentalist Christian settlement has been burnt to the ground by the Boxers, or the Chinese anti foreign society. Theodore was the only survivor, and among those dead was his father. With his fathers mission destroyed, Theodore has no choice but to flee. As Theodore hide in the nearby woods, he comes across Mrs. Jones, a fiesty good-hearted woman who likes to collect and classify plants. Mrs. Jones invites Theo into her band of travellers and they head off to Tibet while fleeing bandits. Once in Tibet, they meet the Lama Amachi who rules the Buddhist monastery in Dong Pe. He had set out on a journey, as was tradition, to find the Tulku, or the riencarnated spirit of the late Dalai Lama. When Lama Amachi insists that Theo, Mrs. Jones and her Chinese assistant Lung hold the key to his finding of the Tulku, things started changing for Theodore including his beliefs and what he would think to be right or wrong. This story was nicely written and is a very good adventure-historical fiction combonaton. The author compared the Christian and Buddhist faiths with interesting concepts and ideas that wil keep the pages turning. The author is very discriptive, which is nice because it helps you get into the story more and live with the characters. I felt that this was an excellent novel, although the ending was quite weak and fairly unrelated to the story. I also found that the author repeated some words and ideas more often than he should have.Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Shi-Hsia Hwa VINE VOICE on July 3, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Perhaps the reason this book isn't very well-known is that it represents a divergence from Dickinson's more popular juvenile fantasy novels like "The Weathermonger". That's a pity because - to use an awful cliche - it's a great coming-of-age story.

Again, this isn't an adventure-oriented story like the Changes trilogy ("The Weathermonger", "Heartsease", and "The Devil's Children"). It does have some travelling and some physical conflict but most of the plot occurs as inner conflict in a place of outward peace. With his father and friends killed by the Boxers, missionary kid Theodore finds himself sheltered (or trapped) at a Tibetan monastery with a middle-aged English botanist and her young Chinese lover.

Also unlike Dickinson's aforementioned fantasy books, this one doesn't have much in terms of supernatural phenomena. There are episodes of spirit possession and Theodore's occasionally sensing the presence or absence of his God or the Buddhist gods, but attributing these to his and the monks' imagination if you're so inclined isn't incompatible with events as stated.

Dickinson deals subtly with a subject that a lot of other novels paint in broad brush strokes - what happens when a young person is forced to reexamine their beliefs. Most characters in stories like this either end up becoming ever more zealous or rejecting their childhood religion completely, depending on the author. Theodore does neither, and I think that ambiguity in his mind near the end is powerfully described and realistic.

[As a side note, I would like to point out that another reviewer's labelling Theodore and his father as "fundamentalist" is inaccurate and rather unfair, given the modern associations of the word with violence and bigotry.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anders Lidholm on November 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book is special, different as it is an adventure book and deep book about life and religion at the same time. It is one of these books that give you a long lasting feeling that stays within you for a long time, and you want to read it again and again. It is like Kiplings Kim, a straight story and can be read like that, but at the same time a book with .... not a message but with the right questions. A good book.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 22, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Tulku, by Peter Dickinson, was not all that great a book. It deals a lot with Buddhism with an unnecessary lead-in. It takes some knowledge, however, to understand the religious parts but is somewhat enjoyable without the knowledge of Buddhism if an adventure without a lot of details is anjoyable to the reader. A Christian boy joins up with an English traveller and her porter and they eventually end up at the rich monastery, Dong Pe, where an oracle says the English woman is carrying the next Tulku, a person of high rank in Buddhism. This book deals with the powers of spirits and the beliefs of different religions, somewhat comparing them.
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