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Tundra Discoveries Paperback – July 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge (July 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881068764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881068764
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 11 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,097,896 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3-An attractive, ambitious, but not totally satisfying picture-book overview of arctic tundra life. Each double-page spread focuses on a month, beginning and ending with April. An animal is introduced on the left side; the facing page shows it in a landscape and asks a question intended to invite participation ("How many caribou can you count?"). A thermometer gives the average temperature for the month and a small pie chart indicates the proportion of hours of daylight and darkness on a typical day. The final spread shows a kind of seasonal spectrum with each of the 13 tundra dwellers and the instructions, "Try to see how many of them you can name!" The watercolor illustrations are accurate in their depiction of the animals, but feature a black-outline style that gives the landscapes a two-dimensional look. The audience for the book is questionable. The subject might be of interest to grade-school children but the format and the questions seem geared to preschoolers. However, the proportional pie charts, which look confusingly similar to clock faces, would be difficult for those children to interpret. The text is interesting but oversimplified. While Wadsworth writes that caribou migrate along "well-worn trails they have taken for centuries," biologists and hunters find that, although caribou herds have traditional summer and winter grounds, the routes themselves may vary from year to year. A glossary provides some useful definitions for terms such as "biome" and "permafrost," and some words ("herd," "claws") that are hard to imagine a child not knowing.
Sue Sherif, Fairbanks North Star Borough Public Library, AK
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

paper 0-88106-876-4 Above the Arctic Circle the return of spring is announced not with daffodils and robins but by caribou migrating north. This calendar of the tundra follows the seasonal changes from April to April, including average temperatures and the dwindling and lengthening hours of daylight. Every month the text features a different creaturemosquitoes, snowy owls, wolves, and musk oxen among themand highlights how it survives. Wadsworth notes how the fur of the arctic hare changes to white in winter, while in June, returning birds such as plovers and sandpipers build their nests of sticks and grass directly on the ground. Carrozza's soft illustrations capture much detail but are also easy to navigate. This is an intelligent overview of the effects of the circling seasons in an environmental niche not noticeably affected by humans. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-10) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

I thrive in my world of books, reading, research, and writing award-winning nonfiction titles. Biographies, natural history and American history are my main focus. Each of my books is for young readers ... and the young at heart! I have a reputation for being a research junkie and in my house, that means tiptoeing around boxes (my style of file cabinets) in my office, stacks of "very important" papers, and teetering towers of reference books that don't fit into my floor-to-ceiling bookcases. Despite my predilection for research, I have managed to publish 26 nonfiction books, and many others are still waiting to find that perfect home.

I come from a creative family and we all love the natural world. My father made his living writing westerns and then adventure novels for young readers. His father also wrote western novels and for the "Big Slicks." My mother was an artist and her father was director of the San Diego Natural History Museum. I have one brother who is a professional photographer and another who, along with his wife, are the publishers of many award-winning natural history books (Cachuma Press).

When I'm not working in my office, I often like to garden or head to the hills behind my house. I take my "writing buddies," Willa and Scout (my golden retrievers), plus my newest little black & white dog (a poodle mix) named Oreo. While I hike, I like to think about my books. Sometimes I go further and visit our national parks. Many of my ideas come together after one of these "explores."

Customer Reviews

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
I just bought this book last week for a bedtime story book for my 7-year old. He has requested it again every night since. The pictures have really caught his imagination. They are nice and detailed but a bit repetitive for me. But my boy loves them and that's what matters. I wish I could buy more books that make this big an impression.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
The pictures are really great. Kind of a panorama of Audobon animals
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
The pictures of the cold arctic climate and wildlife work well with my kids as a summertime bedtime story book.
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