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Tune In Tokyo:The Gaijin Diaries [Kindle Edition]

Tim Anderson
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (161 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $14.95
Kindle Price: $3.99
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Book Description

Everyone wants to escape their boring, stagnant lives full of inertia and regret. But so few people actually have the bravery to run – run away from everything and selflessly seek out personal fulfillment on the other side of the world where they don’t understand anything and won’t be expected to. The world is full of cowards. Tim Anderson was pushing thirty and working a string of dead-end jobs when he made the spontaneous decision to pack his bags and move to Japan. It was a gutsy move, especially for a tall, white, gay Southerner who didn’t speak a lick of Japanese. But his life desperately needed a shot of adrenaline, and what better way to get one than to leave behind his boyfriend, his cat, and his Siouxsie and the Banshees box set to move to “a tiny, overcrowded island heaving with clever, sensibly proportioned people who make him look fat”? In Tokyo, Tim became a “gaijin,” an outsider whose stumbling progression through Japanese culture is minutely chronicled in these sixteen hilarious stories. Despite the steep learning curve and the seemingly constant humiliation, the gaijin from North Carolina gradually begins to find his way. Whether playing drums on the fly in an otherwise all-Japanese noise band or attempting to keep his English classroom clean when it’s invaded by an older female student with a dirty mind, Tim comes to realize that living a meaningful life is about expecting the unexpected...right when he least expects it.

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When Anderson decides his life in North Carolina is in a rut, he chooses to make a dramatic change and moves to Japan to teach English, as he chronicles in this hilarious, enlightening, and insightful memoir. Anderson is tall, white, and extremely gay—all things that distinguish him from the average person in Japan. His various adventures—accidentally stumbling into the adult area of Tokyo and learning that Japanese porn cuts out all the good parts; discovering the hard way the low standards some English academies have for their teachers; experiencing the joys of karaoke and experimental music—help Anderson begin to understand the differences between American and Japanese culture. A gifted writer, Anderson is sensitive to cultural differences, delightful in his irreverence, and astutely aware of himself and his particular perspective. His observations are often laugh-out-loud funny and will leave readers with the desire to travel and to keep turning the pages, wondering, by the end, where Anderson will travel to next.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

“Aside from such classroom encounters and problems of his own with the Japanese language that vaguely recall David Sedaris’ Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000), Anderson regales his readers with tales of Japanese popular culture and his own social life…” –Booklist

Product Details

  • File Size: 639 KB
  • Print Length: 294 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1612181317
  • Publisher: Lake Union Publishing; Reprint edition (November 29, 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0050KIRE6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,698 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
132 of 139 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tuned Out But In Tokyo October 14, 2011
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The pleasure any reader will have in any travelogue depends on the personality of the author. Does he or she make a good travel companion? Tim Anderson is snarkily funny and doesn't complain. He plunges into the life of an English teacher in Tokyo with brio. Tokyo is one of my favorite cities and Anderson's narrative is often amusing. I'm not sorry I "visited" Tokyo again and glimpsed it again through his eyes. Tokyo is a fascinating city and Tim gives us all the surface glitz.

Don't expect great insights or to learn anything new about Japan.

I didn't mind that Tim was self-absorbed,ignorant and clueless at the beginning of the book. One travels to discover and learn. Or some of us do. But the typical chapter in this book will have Tim observing some typically Tokyo scene and then go off into some kind of fantasy riff as if the stuff happening in Tim's head was more real than what he was seeing. Worse, the fantasy seemed to shut off his natural curiosity about what he saw so he remained ignorant and was never driven to find out why.

At only one point did he come close to grasping an essential difference between Japan and America and that was in the chapter on karaoke. He notes that Americans hog the microphone playing the big star that they see in their heads. Then he talks about going out drunk with a group of Japanese who when one person sang would act like the back up singers/musical group. And he got into it--he liked being part of the group with everybody participating...but it didn't lead him to a better understanding of the importance of the group to the Japanese persona. At the end of the chapter he declares his intention of continuing to hog the microphone in the American Way.
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58 of 63 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not too impressed, gomen ne January 3, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I bought this book because it sounded like I had a lot in common with the author. I too, teach English in Japan (although not Tokyo) and I was excited to read a book detailing the adventures of another young gay guy in Japan.

Unfortunately, it kind of let me down. The writing, for me, was hard to follow. There were times when Mr. Anderson would launch into detailed fantasies mid-story. A lot of the times, it was hard to distinguish what he was actually seeing and doing and what he was just fantasizing about. Another thing that made the book hard to read was the use of really really long, detailed sentences that used several examples and descriptions and references all crammed into an incredibly long run-on-esque sentence that when I was in junior high and high school my teachers would always berate me about and threaten me with certain death unless I beat it into my poor hormonal, adolescent brain that it was wrong and I avoided them at all costs. <<< Kind of like that.

The result of this made want to fast forward to the end of several paragraphs to bypass all of the (at times) unnecessary description and fluff.

As for the content, I laughed a few times and I think the author was spot on in his description of certain things. Other times, I found myself raising an eyebrow at what I was reading. I felt a lot of times that I was just reading a big gay stereotype. Some of the references in the book maybe outdate me (sorry!), but it just felt like he was turning himself into a gay caricature to make a point.

Usually when moving to a new country and living there for an extended period of time, you change as a person. I didn't really get that from this book. If there was any self-realization or maturing, it didn't come through very strongly.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fish out of water story with details galore September 15, 2011
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The term "gaijin" (Japanese slang for "foreigner") actually has close literal roots to the term "hairy barbarian," the way westerners were viewed when the term was coined (and in many ways, still to this day).

I'm a fan of Japanese culture (three ex-girlfriends who were Jaoanese, JPOP and the cuisine, mostly) and over the years I've become educated in some of the "inside" details of the culture, like "kawaii" ("cute," but in a sugary, adolescent, "Hello Kitty" kind of way). I've also read Christopher Seymour's Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese Underworld...which I highly recommend...because it's a book that balances the sunnier, goofy, sweetly eccentric aspects of the culture emphasized in Anderson's book with the more harsh, stark, day-to-day realities of life in Japan.

There are three kinds of "gaijins" who go to Japan in an attempt to immerse themselves in the culture:

1). The outsider. They arrive an outsider, remain an outsider, and leave an outsider

2). Those who "fit in," with varying degrees of success, primarily via making themselves "useful" (such as teaching English)

3). What Anderson describes as a "Japanger"..."the overwhelming feeling of frustration and displeasure, usually of Western people living in Japan, resulting from doing daily battle with the sometimes maddening idiosyncrasies and inscrutable behaviors of the Japanese people."

Where does Anderson, as a "gaijin" from the American South, fit into this picture? At different times during his adventure, he experiences a little of all three categories.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for those who have had the experience and want to reminisce
although my 3 month stay in Tokyo ended over 20 years ago, I found myself nodding my head and laughing many times while reading the author's experiences with many of the Japanese... Read more
Published 28 days ago by Phil
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read
I really enjoyed reading about his experiences in Japan. He writes with candor, humor and skill. I highly recommend this book.
Published 1 month ago by Eric Blair
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a drag
The book is described as "howlingly funny". That's a hard mark to hit and the author falls far short. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jimok580
3.0 out of 5 stars Not my style
I have always been fascinated with living in Tokyo, and while there have been some great memoirs (Thursdays in Yokohama (The Casebook of Irving and Innocence) this one I felt to... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Ms Sumida
4.0 out of 5 stars Tune in Tokyo
Does this book make me want to visit Japan? Ummm....50/50. But since I've known of quite a few people that went to Japan to teach English, it was still pretty funny. Read more
Published 1 month ago by heather
5.0 out of 5 stars Please Don't End
I did not want it to end. I wish I could have been Tim. It was fun to live in Tokyo vicariously through him. I loved learning about Japan through him.
Published 1 month ago by David Ausman
4.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious in Parts
A fish out of water, or in this case gay guy teaching English in Japan. Usual culture clash observations but delivered with some panache and humour.
Published 1 month ago by Mharper06
2.0 out of 5 stars Tune in tokoyo
Did not suit my reading .....lost interest and quit reading maybe I will give it another chance later
Bye bye or syanora
Published 1 month ago by Louise Della Maggiora
5.0 out of 5 stars Do not miss out
Funniest thing I have read in awhile. Full of hilarious adventures of a white man in Japan, as funny as reading about the adventures of a blackman living in Japan who taught... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Reiter
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic
I know that the brilliant Mr. Tim Anderson would have a review full of quick wit and awesomeness. I bow my head, admit how unworthy I am, and leave a normal straightforward review. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Linda Baird
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More About the Author

Tim Anderson is the author of Sweet Tooth and Tune in Tokyo: The Gaijin Diaries, which Publishers Weekly called "laugh-out-loud funny," Shelf Awareness called "so much fun," and Michiko Kakutani of the New York Times completely ignored. He is an editor and lives in Brooklyn with his husband, Jimmy; his cat, Stella; and his yoga balance ball, Sheila. Tim also writes young adult historical fiction under the name T. Neill Anderson and blogs at seetimblog.blogspot.com. His favorite Little Debbie snack cake is the Fudge Round.

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