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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 21, 2008
"If it's so easy to understand and it makes so much sense, why don't more companies get tuned it?"

"Tuned In" by Craif Stull, Phil Myers & David Meerman Scott is a book on how to create the "resonator", the product that sells itself. Or (quoted from the book);

"The perfect solution to a specific problem"

"A product or service that people want to buy without being coerced"

"An offering that establishes a real and direct connection to what your market values most"

"An idea that people immediately understand has value to them, even if they have never heard of your company or its products and services"

The book describes the six steps of creating the resonator

Contents

Chapter 1: Why Didn't We Think of That?

Chapter 2: Tuned Out... and Just Guessing

Chapter 3: Get Tuned In

Chapter 4: Step 1: Find Unresolved Problems

Chapter 5: Step 2: Understand Buyer Personas

Chapter 6: Step 3: Quantify the Impact

Chapter 7: Step 4: Create Breakthrough Experiences

Chapter 8: Step 5: Articulate Powerful Ideas

Chapter 9: Step 6: Establish Authentic Connections

Chapter 10: Cultivate a Tuned In Culture

Chapter 11: Unleash Your Resonator

...

Let's compare "Tuned In" to the ideal business book that is easy to understand, distinct, practical, credible, insightful, and provides great reading experience.

Ease of Understanding: 9/10: This book is very structured and it's very hard to NOT understand. The concepts are not complicated. They are straight to the point with great examples all over the book.

Distinction: 5/10: The concept of this book is another "customer-centric innovation". There are hundreds of this kind of book on the shelf already. However, the way the authors present the concept with clear and concise examples is refreshing. This concept of the book is identical to others: just better.

Practicality: 8/10: The six steps (plus what should be done before and after the steps) are simple enough to follow no matter what industry you are in. The authors showed examples ranging from the ice-cream shop to the comedian to Apple to the presidential election! The various examples with simple yet solid steps will make you think that you can do it.

Credibility: 8/10: The vivid examples, again, "resonate" well with the concepts and steps. You can't really deny the proven concept, customer-centric innovation. It's so simple that make you think "There's no reason I shouldn't believe this."

Insight: 6/10: The real substance of the book is how it connects the concepts to examples. You will not find deep analysis or research in a particular subject. Moreover, this book tries hard not to bore you. Once the excitement in the topic fades, the authors move onto another topic.

Reading Experience: 7/10: Reading "Tuned In" is enjoyable. You'll read the contents of the books about how to create a "resonator" and you'll think "Now..... How are you trying to convince me?" Craig Stull, Phil Myers, and David Meerman Scott will then give you simple explanations and excellent examples.

Overall: 7.2/10: As I mentioned far too many times already that the examples of this book are excellent. The six steps to create the "resonator" are very easy to apply. If you are swimming in the ocean of books on innovation and could not find a good book that you can get your team or yourself rolling right away. This example-driven practical book on customer-centric innovation is tuned in for you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 12, 2008
Great Book!! Your own personal opinion is irrelevant no matter what situation you are in. You can accomplish more than you've ever imagined in your personal and professional life by observing and listening to others and what they want. And whether it's right or wrong, let it go. Just give them what they want and the paybacks will come. This book is another great spin on the principles of Dale Carnegie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 23, 2012
I enjoyed reading this book mostly due to interesting examples. Business stories about Disneyland, Nalgene bottles, BlackBerry, Apple (although I'd argue on this one), fascinating story about Zipcar, Cold Stone Ice cream, U.S. Navy, LG electronics and their Internet-enabled refrigerator (a total failure), Boeing and Airbus, story on U.S. presidential election approach to segment buyers (voters), and a lot of smaller stories like two house architects with different strategies. The only thing I missed is having more international examples as opposed to more local to U.S., since some of those I heard were for the first time while it seemed like writer assumed all readers "know what he is talking about".

I especially liked few chapters about Distinctive Competence, Buyer persona, Acid test - the book gives a good clue on these topics.

This book generally encourages you to listen to your buyer and the market and with those great examples shows you why this is such important thing. On the other hand it says very little on how to accomplish this (this is left to seminars and trainings I guess). Therefore I give 4 out of 5 stars.

Totaling, this is one of those books that make me look at some stuff in my life differently: things like TV ad and board advertisement on the street, customer service, products and services around, questions I am being asked when I seek for solutions.
I recommend this to entrepreneurs and managers who are in charge of building a product strategy.
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Why did Apple Newton fail while iPod succeeded? "Tuned in." The company didn't tune in when it created Newton. The iPod was a different story. In promoted "1000 songs in your pocket," Apple solved several problems: giving people a way to carry their songs in something small, making it easy to get songs from computer to iPod and creating a product that is easy to use.

Not all stories in "Tuned In: Uncover the Extraordinary Opportunities That Lead to Business Breakthroughs" come from big and innovative companies like Apple. In fact, the book tells about a tuned in magician (one-person business), niche camera (not a well-known brand), and a company's newsletter.

Many companies fail to ask prospects what problems they need solving. Instead, they create a problem and a solution that they think people need. An excellent example comes from Magnavox. Did the company think people needed more features on their TV sets?

No. Instead, Magnavox talked to customers asking them about the problems they had with their TVs. Sometimes customers don't know that answer and the tuned in company must help them figure it out. Through this process, Magnavox stumbled on a problem we all have (including my own household) -- we lose our remotes on a regular basis.

So what does the company do? It added a button on its TV sets that locates the remote. This feature should become a standard for ALL TV-related products that come with a remote.

Some employees think talking to friends and family helps them tune in. It doesn't. They can't always be target customer for a company's products and services. Here's where knowing customers enters the picture. When a company knows its customers well enough, it knows where to find them and interview them to tune in.

The book could use more examples especially of one-person or very small business stories like the magician who found his niche. The start of the book captivates, but then it drags by the middle as it falls in the trap of what some business books tend to do and starts spending too much time on its framework. The examples draws the reader in more than anything else.

For the most part, "Tuned In: Uncover the Extraordinary Opportunities That Lead to Business Breakthroughs" is a fast and breezy read offering valuable insight into the six-step process for tuning in by using real-life examples.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2008
I read this book at just the right time - I was in the crucial "needing to test my product on real people" (but not really wanting to) phase, and this book made me buckle down and focus on how important it was to talk with, poll, and listen to your potential customers. i.e. being "tuned in."

The process outlined in the book is somewhat simple, and is likely stuff we've all heard before, but it's presented in a way that makes you realize exactly how important it is to really tune into your customer base - whether you have a company, are a musician, pastor, leader, or just want to market yourself better!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Tuned In. Uncover the extraordinary opportunities that lead to business breakthroughs. Craig Stull, Phil Myers & David Meerman Scott. 2008. ISBN9780470260364. I am a David Meerman Scott fan and this book does not disappoint. The book does a very good job pointing out ways to discover your key value proposition, how to clearly articulate it as well as how to get to the present non consumers of your product. A good book for todays marketing challenges with exceptional application to differentiation and finding high value segmentation.
Read about resonators such as :
* clubhub
* RIM
* BillMeLAter
* Nalgene
* TheatreChurch.com
* Boeing's Dreamliner
* ZipCar
* GoPro
* IPod
* Cold Stone Creamery
* Cincom
* Hubspot
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