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Tuned In: Uncover the Extraordinary Opportunities That Lead to Business Breakthroughs Hardcover – June 30, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (June 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047026036X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470260364
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This well-reasoned and useful guide argues that successful innovators can develop products that resonate by connecting deeply with consumers. This simple idea is delivered in a conversational tone and illustrated in well-structured chapters laying out a six-step Tuned in Process and examples that span borders and industries. From anecdotes about countryside hotels that sprouted up to provide respite for Japanese salarymen to Nalgene plastic bottles, which escaped the laboratory to achieve cult status and ultimately mass market consumer appeal, fascinating case studies abound. However, as appealing as the concept and the many examples are, the enthusiastic presentation begins to grate; the repeated invocation of the Tuned in Process may tire readers looking for more subtlety and fewer sound bites. Still, there is sufficient fodder for anyone who wants to shake the sleep out of an organization and renew a focus on creating the kind of value that customers are willing to pay for. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

This well-reasoned and useful guide argues that successful innovators can develop products that "resonate" by connecting deeply with consumers. This simple idea is delivered in a conversational tone and illustrated in well-structured chapters laying out a six-step "Tuned in Process" and examples that span borders and industries. From anecdotes about countryside hotels that sprouted up to provide respite for Japanese salarymen to Nalgene plastic bottles, which escaped the laboratory to achieve cult status and ultimately mass market consumer appeal, fascinating case studies abound. However, as appealing as the concept and the many examples are, the enthusiastic presentation begins to grate; the repeated invocation of the "Tuned in Process" may tire readers looking for more subtlety and fewer sound bites. Still, there is sufficient fodder for anyone who wants to shake the sleep out of an organization and renew a focus on creating the kind of value that customers are willing to pay for. (June)  (Publishers Weekly, April 7, 2008)

 

"...helpful summaries...lively read for sales and marketing departments" (Training & Coaching Today, September)


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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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So to me, it felt like the example was incomplete.
Tracy L. Needham
If you want to learn how to build a great product your customers will love, this is a book you should read.
Mike Volpe
The authors use real-life examples throughout the book to explain the six-step Tuning In process.
Julie Neal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jean-Claude Balland on July 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Remove the examples from the book, and you have for the most part a collection of already known high level concepts without much depth. Granted, marketing does not have to be complicated and it should not be, but creating innovative products requires more than concepts. For example, the first step in the authors' Tuned-in "process" is "Find unresolved problems". OK, good point, but I knew that and you probably did know that too! How do I do it? The authors's advice: "ask the customers"! But I knew that too. Tell me more. "Ask your non-customers". Wow,I would never have thought of that. Tell me more. "Go to trade shows" say the authors. I knew that too. Tell me more. "Ask open questions", "Keep an open mind", etc. say the authors. At the end of this chapter and of most chapters, I fell frustrated of not learning approaches or tips I have not heard about before and of not learning more how to do it.

At the end of Chapter 4, I was going to drop the book, but the examples kept me going. There are at least 50 examples of Tuned-in companies from Disneyland to the Maganavox remote control that locates itself to the ubiquitous iPod. These examples are interesting by themselves. They are spread through the book to illustrate each step and to validate the entire tuned-in "process".

I keep putting process in between quotes because what the authors present is not really a process. It is more a framework. In addition, it seems that not one of the examples was actually the result of applying the authors' framework under their guidance. So the whole edifice is an after-the-fact analysis of successful innovations that serves to justify the author's framework. I would have liked to see at least one example of a product that the authors actually helped develop.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Brad Shorr on June 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Why did the Apple Newton flop and the iPod rock? How did a struggling magician transform himself into a success with a three-word tagline? How did a car rental startup grab an entire market segment that was just sitting there for the big guys to gobble up? Answer: it was all a matter of tuning in.

It stands to reason if an organization wants to develop products and services that resonate with people, the first step is to ask people what they want. Simple as it sounds, authors Stull, Myers, and Scott, each of whom has extensive experience working with large firms and non-profits, observe that many of them simply don't do it. Those that do often lack the right processes to gather and act upon the information they receive. As a result, they roll out products and services that fall absolutely flat, squandering their resources and completely missing golden opportunities.

The authors contend the solution is to tune in. Instead of selecting new product initiatives in ivory tower executive suites and developing them in the lab, get to the grass roots. Talk to actual people, uncover their most urgent needs, and craft solutions. This strikes me as an incredibly sensible approach; perhaps that is why big companies are apt to overlook it.

The book focuses on the why and how of tuning in, with emphasis on the how. The authors lay out a 6-step process for tuning in, very detailed yet written in plain English every reader will understand -

1. Find unresolved problems
2. Understand buyer personas
3. Quantify the impact
4. Create breakthrough experiences
5. Articulate powerful ideas
6.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By F. Stanton Sipes on June 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Whether starting a business, attempting to grow an existing corporation, or leading a product management division, the most vital question that must be answered is whether your product or service is solving a problem or providing something so unique that is important enough that people will pay for it.

The authors of Tuned In give us encouragement that we can not only return our culture to one that is truly "Tuned In" to our customers, but they also give us a blueprint to sustain that focus. Most companies start with a great idea that comes from an entrepreneur that is listening intently to the marketplace, and creates a company around a solution or product. If they are lucky, those companies grow and prosper around that ability to solve the market's problem or fill a need. More often, though, the market changes, and if we dont change with our customers needs, we will be left to guessing what those customers need, and we will spend enormous amounts of money in advertising trying to convince our market that they need our product.
This book brings us face to face with that reality, provides a process to begin to move back in line with our market, and gives we as business leaders a renewed focus on that aspect of our culture. Solving a problem or providing a product that our customers want is our sole reason for being, is it not? Tuned In will take it's place as one of the great books that brings us back to the basics in business, and it will be a must read for any entrepreneur, business leader or marketing exec for years to come.
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