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El Tunel / The Tunnel (Spanish Edition) (Spanish) Paperback – July 1, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-8432216428 ISBN-10: 8432216429 Edition: Poc

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El Tunel / The Tunnel (Spanish Edition) + Rayuela (Spanish Edition) + Cien años de soledad (Vintage Espanol) (Spanish Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Planeta Publishing; Poc edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 8432216429
  • ISBN-13: 978-8432216428
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 4.5 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #121,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

El tunel"" (1948), del argentino Ernesto Sabato, es una de las grandes novelas sudamericanas de este siglo, cuyos ecos recogieron pronto en Europa Graham Greene y Camus. El relato, montado con los recursos de la novela policial, desarrolla un personaje que revela su psicologia introspectiva e impone al lector un analisis de la desesperanza. El protagonista, Juan Pablo Castel, persigue inutilmente lo inalcanzable, que no es sino el regreso a la infancia, simbolizada en la ventana de un cuadro, motivo reiterado largamente en la narracion. --Los editores

Language Notes

Text: Spanish --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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It's a wonderfull show of the power of writing.
martýn alexandro
This is the only piece of fiction I have read that has grabbed me to the point that 'I could not put it down'.
JAMES TRAVIS
I received the book very fast. it was for my Spanish class.
virginia matos

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By M. Mazza on March 7, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sábato, a través de Juan Pablo Castel, nos atrapa en la desesperación de encontrarle un significado a la vida. Muchos lectores hablan de la sicología del personaje principal pero olvidan que la novela demuestra los fines absurdos donde llegan los que se guían exclusivamente por la lógica--esa gran herramienta creada por el hombre que suele confundirse con la verdad (absoluto que buscamos sin éxito). Castel proporciona inferencias insólitas que poco a poco lo van ahogando, escondiéndole cada vez más la posibilidad de su amor ideal y revelándole una melancolía inevitable. Sus grandes razonamientos solo logran incrementar el misterio. Esta obra brilla precisamente porque Castel sufre la gran soledad de la condición humana. María Iribarne--bella, triste, indefinible, misteriosa e inalcanzable--es la víctima del trágico Castel--el que búsca estancarla en su esquema de la vida. Aunque comete un acto atroz, el lector se encuentra compadeciendo al protagonista por sus semejantes locuras--ya que todas son extremadamente humanas. Hay algo de Castel en todos. Este es un libro dimensional que se debe de leer varias veces para aprender de sus dolorosas sutilezas. Esto resulta placentero, ya que la narración de Sábato es sumamente accesible y seductora.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By JAMES TRAVIS on April 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is the only piece of fiction I have read that has grabbed me to the point that 'I could not put it down'. Juan Pablo Castel is obviously insane ---- but then why do I keep reading his confession? This is 115 pages and it just does not stop. Don't bother trying to categorize this work. It is one of a kind.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
este libro es excelente tanto por su tratamiento de un tema tan complejo como la mente humana y ademas por ser tan corto, conciso y preciso espero que todos lo disfruten
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
Sábato's "El Túnel" is a deep study into the human psyche. María Iribarne is seen by Juan Pablo Castel as a reflection of himself, as a soulmate capable of understanding his deepest fears, dreams and passions, represented by the window in his painting. However, Castel comes to the painful realization that María is also human, with her own world of sin and confusion, a member of the cynical world which he despises and keeps away from. Shattered by his knowledge that even his new search for a completion of himself in María must end in finding society and the lowliness of existence, he decides to kill her. Basically, he is afraid of really getting to know himself through María, afraid of pursuing his new conquest without relying on his logic and rationalism, which end up becoming paranoic becuase of his continued inability to fully predict and comprehend María, the mysterious figure of all that is unknown, hidden, liberating, and satisfying in his own self. So it is that the books becomes not only an insight into the psychology of a troubled man trying to find something fresh in a stale society, but also a critique of blind faith in rationalism and logic, urging us to sometimes forget the analytical and sometimes mechanical workings of our mind and to embark on our search with the greatest weapons and expressions of our individuality: our feelings. Upon finding that our own thought and even what seems pure to us may be corrupted by the world, we are left with the need to seek a higher meaning. This return to spirituality, as a uniting and balancing force of both men's rational capacities and his physical and psychological needs and desires, is also present in the work of Hermann Hesse, another writer whom I recommend to those interested in the eternal struggle of man against his worst enemy: his own inner world.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bryon Butler on January 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a resident in Argentina, I have learned that the Argentine dream comes true for someone who lives a good life in or around Buenos Aires, drives a European car, speaks English, travels to Europe and/or to the United States, and works for an international company. Hence Argentina, a nation built on immigrants and with a strong culture, has never developed a strong national identity. A friend of mine, studying here for her doctorate in counseling, commented recently that her time is spent studying French theories.
France is what I had in mind as I read Ernesto Sábato's El túnel (The Tunnel), which describes the descent and fall of Juan Pablo Castel, a noted Argentine painter who becomes addicted to María Iribarne, the only person he feels understands what his work really means. Castel does not love, can not love, will not love, and only briefly, at times, rises above his own demons to experience lucidity and the fresh air of common sense. His soul cannot be touched, and his dark world of pain is like a dark tunnel without end. María, a married woman touched to her core by one of his paintings, forgoes her vows to be with and comfort a man incapable of receiving it, thus losing out on the comfort she hopes to receive from him.
The book, written in 1948, impactingly expresses the existentialism and nihilism that came for fore (and in the case of nihilism returned to the fore) after World War II. The chief proponent of this existentialism was the French philosopher Sartre, and one character in The Tunnel is found reading a Sartre book. This is not to suggest that Sábato is merely rehashing the work of another.
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