Tunnel in the Sky (Heinlein's Juveniles Book 9) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $1.11
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tunnel in the Sky Paperback – March 15, 2005


See all 37 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$41.23 $19.98
Unknown Binding, Import
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (March 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416505512
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416505518
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.2 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (170 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #534,663 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Like many people, I go way, way back with Heinlein. My very favorite book (and one that stands out in my mind--and with much affection--to this day) is Tunnel in the Sky. I really, really wanted to go off to explore new worlds with a covered wagon and horses, like the hero does at the very end of the book. But one of the nice things about Robert Heinlein is that he's got something for everyone. One of my best friends has a different favorite: Podkayne of Mars. Go figure.
                        --Shelly Shapiro, Executive Editor --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

It was just a test . . .
But something had gone wrong. Terribly wrong. What was to have been a standard ten-day survival test had suddenly become an indefinite life-or-death nightmare.
Now they were stranded somewhere in the universe, beyond contact with Earth . . . at the other end of a tunnel in the sky. This small group of young men and women, divested of all civilized luxuries and laws, were being forced to forge a future of their own . . . a strange future in a strange land where sometimes not even the fittest could survive!
". . . fascinating . . . ingenious . . . this a book in the grand tradition of high literature!"
-- The New York Times


From the Paperback edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I read this book years ago while I was in High School.
beau
"Tunnel in the Sky" is one of Robert A. Heinlein's juvenile science fiction novels, which he wrote to target the young adult audience.
rzaster
Well written, exciting, great characters, and a wonderful story line.
Whisky Warrior

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

107 of 111 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Shepherd VINE VOICE on April 30, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Heinlein felt that anyone who could not do everything from plan an invasion, change a diaper, butcher a hog, write a sonnet, design a building, or program a computer was at least partially incapacitated. In addition, he felt that our schools did a very poor job of preparing young people for what life was all about. This book presented at least one partial solution to both problems: have a school course in survival, whose final test was to be dropped onto some unknown 'wilderness' planet for a week and forced to actually survive. Around this basic concept Heinlein fashioned what is probably one of the best of his so-called 'juvenile' novels.
Roderick Walker is the prime character, a young man with some doubts about whether he is really ready to take the final exam in this course. With some encouragement and advice from his older sister, he decides to proceed, going through the 'gate' to a new world where nothing is familiar, where everything must be viewed as potentially deadly. But after managing to survive for the prescribed time, there is no pick up signal, no return gate, and Rod slowly comes to the conclusion that, regardless of what has gone wrong, he must make a go of really living long term on this new world. Along with other class survivors, a small society is formed, initially with Rod as the nominal leader.
From this point, Heinlein manages to show the essentials of how and why a government is formed, what type of government make sense for a small group, how a society protects itself from 'bullies' (the only truly deadly animal is the two-legged variety), the contribution made by both sexes to a properly functioning society, just what makes a man a man, and the essential qualities of a leader.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Rachel E. Watkins on August 1, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an excellent adventure by the main charachter. I always enjoy the libertarian viewpoints countered with the mostly socialist/communist settings he portrays. Heinlein has this theme in many of his books, of moving from bondage in an overly controled society(and includes well thought out reasons to how society progressed to that state), to freedom and anarchary, then finding equilibriam between the two in a free, but structured society(this is also a strong theme in 'The Moon is a Harsh Mistress'). This book couples that theme with coming of age, and survival. When I first read this book when I was 13 it prompted me to learn about survival and gardening, and when I just re-read it a few weeks ago(I'm 24 now) I reflected on the state of government and our place within. A thought-provoking, funny at times, tragic at times, and in all excellent as Heinlein always is. I highly reccomend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 20, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers and Time Enough for Love are more familiar to readers than Tunnel in the Sky. But this novel of pioneering and coming-of-age is well worth reading.
Rod,who is a kind of "everyman" character, sets off for his final exam in a survival course. The students can take up to a certain weight of any equipment they want, from the latest model laser blaster, a German shepherd dog, and in one case, a saucepan and a deck of cards, and are dropped by star gate on an uninhabited planet. Objective; to survive until the pickup signal a few days later. But something goes terribly, terribly wrong. The pickup signal never happens and the band of survivors, from various schools' classes, must join and form a society for surviving the completely primitive planet.
How they band together and get over the natural personality frictions, use the little they have brought and how they survive all the unexpected challenges makes for exciting reading. The most appealing part of the book is that the protagonist Rod is NOT top dog, the big hero, but struggles along honestly and prevails. This is a charming book and shows Heinlein at his best in handling some of the emotions of young men.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By B.S. on February 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this book when I was around the age of 10 and it's been one I revisit every few years. For more detailed info, check out the other reviews.

Normally, I'd rate this title higher. However, I cannot give the current Kindle version a full five stars because it is painfully obvious that no one has taken the time to give this version an ounce of quality control.

Problems include:

- missing words: In several places, sentences and paragraphs end mid-statement. Readers are able to draw a conclusion as to what is missing and what was being said but it does disturb the emersion.

- missing punctuation: A lot of sentences, particularly ones at the end of paragraphs, had missing punctuation. Dialogue was often missing quotation marks.

- misspelled words: The OCR software that was used did a poor job of word recognition in places. For instance, I remember a paragraph that started with "111". After looking at what the context was, I was able to discern that the intended word was "I'll"

-formatting errors: As one reads through this, be prepared to have line breaks in the middle of sentences, paragraphs that run into one another and other odd formatting.

I know the above seems hyper-critical but this poor level of conversion is something I'd expect from self-published authors and many of Amazon's $0.99 deals. I really do expected better from publishers, Especially when charging full price.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?