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Turn Left at Orion: Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Home Telescope - and How to Find Them Spiral-bound – November 14, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0521153973 ISBN-10: 0521153972 Edition: 4th

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Turn Left at Orion: Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Home Telescope - and How to Find Them + NightWatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe + The Backyard Astronomer's Guide
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Product Details

  • Spiral-bound: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 4 edition (November 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521153972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521153973
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 0.6 x 12.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,629 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is quite possibly the most inviting guidebook ever written to help people with binoculars and small telescopes find, view, understand, and, most of all, enjoy everything in the night sky from the Moon and planets to distant star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies. And if you think it's only for beginners, think again--every telescope owner should have a copy." Dennis di Cicco, Senior Editor, Sky & Telescope

"Turn Left at Orion is an essential guide for both beginners and more experienced amateur astronomers who will find much inside to reinvigorate their passion for the stars. The diagrams are simple, clear and functional, and the text eloquently captures the excitement of observing. Stargazing has never been made so easy and if you buy just one book on observational astronomy, make sure it's this one." Keith Cooper, Editor, Astronomy Now

"Since it first appeared in 1989, Turn Left at Orion has been an indispensable guidebook for the amateur astronomer possessing nothing more than a small backyard telescope. In this Fourth Edition, Guy Consolmagno and Dan Davis have revised, updated, and expanded its scope. This is not only an essential handbook for the novice, it's a useful reference for the seasoned backyard astronomer. Simply put, whatever your level of experience, you must have this book!" Glenn Chaple, Contributing Editor, Astronomy

Book Description

Written for beginners, this superb book is a complete guide to the night sky. Now covering Southern hemisphere objects and Dobsonian telescopes in detail, it has never been easier for stargazers of all ages and backgrounds to find celestial objects for themselves.

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Customer Reviews

This will help in locating sky objects.
Z. Mather
If you are a telescope/astronomy enthusiast, this book will NOT let you down.
panda44r
Overall I highly recommend this book for every backyard astronomer.
Brian Asdell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Brandon F on March 11, 2012
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
If you are even contemplating the hobby, buy this book. Spiral binding gives huge, easy-to-reference diagrams and descriptions for those who have never looked down a scope. I own a dobsonian 8" and can confirm the sketches as dead-on for what you can expect to see. Painfully easy to use. I like the addition of southern objects, as I plan to eventually vacation in S.A. with the telescope. There isn't a book out there that can approach this in its step-by-step starhopping instructions.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Warren Anderson on March 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fabulous beginner's astronomical observing book, a must have--IN PRINT. In the Kindle version--even read on my high-resolution iPad--the tables at the end are unreadably small and fuzzy.

The body of the text is fine as are the sky images and diagrams. So if you limit yourself to those, perhaps supplemented by some material found at the book's website, you will be satisfied with the experience. And of course the information in the tables is available from a wide variety of other print and web resources.

If the tables could be properly formatted to display correctly on Kindle devices, I would upgrade my review to SIX STARS!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By robert on March 23, 2012
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
Finally, here is something that shows a small scope owner what they can reasonably expect to see with THEIR equipment in THEIR surroundings.
All the required elements are present, from telescope and observing basics to the fine points of galaxy classifications, but they are presented in a way that motivates the reader to search out more.
I wish I had picked this up a long time ago.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Griswel VINE VOICE on July 9, 2012
Format: Spiral-bound
This is the book which answers that questions.

Some books or magazines offer over-sold descriptions and impossible directions (one magazine in particular leans toward cover articles like "Find Pluto with a magnifying glass and some string!"). Others are more realistic but unhelpful. This book is the very best available for someone new to stargazing who wants to look at interesting things.

First, remember that what's important about what you're seeing is what you are looking at. If the fact that what you are seeing is a far away galaxy or thousands of stars in a cluster doesn't excite you, then stargazing won't be as interesting as glancing through deep space photographs online. Turn Left At Orion excels at getting the reader to appreciate what they are seeing when they look into space. Along the same lines, it lets you know what the things you will see will look like. Don't expect the super-saturated colors which digital manipulation produces. With few exceptions (check out Alberio!) the colors you'll see in space are muted. Too many people expect to look into a telescope and see famous Hubble photographs suspended in the sky. It's not like that, and Turn Left At Orion does a great job of setting people's expectations at the right level.

But most importantly, it's written for a beginner who wants to know what can be seen by someone with binoculars or a small telescope. There is a universe of wonders waiting for someone who is willing to look, and this is far and away the best introduction.

Note - the only supplement I would suggest is Antonin Ruckl's Atlas of the Moon. While not an observing guide, it's an excellent series of drawings.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By NightSky724 on February 19, 2012
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
An excellent reference. Even if you're not new to backyard sky-watching, you'll turn to this book time and again. Just the right amount of information to help you view and understand what you're looking at. The moon, plants, stars, galaxies, Messier objects will all come to life. This is exactly what you're looking for to bring pleasure and learning to your night sky viewing. Clear, well-organized and sure to become one of your 'go-to' resources.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bill King on April 11, 2014
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
1) What hardware should I buy, and advice,hints, cautions for using it.
A good book here, and the one often recommended online is:
The Backyard Astronomers Guide by Dickinson and Dyer.

2) What do the interesting objects look like through an amateur telescope.
No one book is a standard popular choice on this, I like Seeing Stars by C.R. Kitchin.
Although about $80 new, I bought one in very good condition used at Amazon for about $16.

3) How to find the object you now wish to observe.
This book, Turn Left At Orion.

Which of the three types is most valuable to the beginner, I would say 3).

Unfortunately as I write this the Amazon Peek Inside is useless for evaluating the book because only the first few pages can be seen and those pages tell nothing about what the book is mainly about. Google Books online will show more pages including many from the middle which will illustrate the help given for each of the 100 or so objects. Unfortunately as I write this Google Books site is showing an older edition (2000 / edition 3) which is arranged differently than the newer (2011 / 4th edition). And I think the newer edition is better in every way!

Views shown for each of the 100 or so interesting sky objects:

1) "where to look view" a naked eye view of a portion of the sky with a label of where the object is inside that view.
The old edition will have 1 to 4 scope icons which is how great the view is through a small 3" refractor telescope.
It will also have 1 to 4 Dobsonian icons representing how great the view is through a dobsonian telescope (these usually have more power and light gathering ability).
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