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  • Turn Me On, Dammit! (Alternative Cover)
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Turn Me On, Dammit! (Alternative Cover)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Helene Bergsholm
  • Directors: Jannicke Systad Jacobsen
  • Format: Anamorphic, Color, NTSC, Subtitled, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: Norwegian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: New Yorker Films
  • DVD Release Date: October 16, 2012
  • Run Time: 76 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008UDXBPK
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #80,503 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

15-year-old Alma (Helene Bergsholm) is consumed by her out-of-control hormones and fantasies that range from sweetly romantic images of Artur, the boyfriend she yearns for, to down-and-dirty daydreams about practically everybody she lays eyes on. Alma and her best friend Sara live in an insufferably boring little town in the hinterlands of Norway called Skoddeheimen, a place they loathe so much that every time their school bus passes the sign that names it, they routinely flip it off. After Alma has a stimulating yet awkward encounter with Artur, she makes the mistake of telling her incredulous friends, who ostracize her at school, until Sara can't even be seen with her. At home, Alma's single mother is overwhelmed and embarrassed by her daughter's extravagant phone sex bills and wears earplugs to muffle Alma's round-the-clock acts of self-gratification.

Review

There's something wonderfully fresh almost subversive, really about a film in which teenage girls speak about sex and obsess over it and crave it as openly as boys. In time-honored John Hughes manner, the movie ends on a happy, reassuring note. But for a genre dominated by American movies in which girls are usually prizes or objects of lust, TURN ME ON, DAMMIT! practically feels revolutionary. --Rene Rodriguez, The Denver Post

Funny, embarrassing and poignant without ever seeming leering or exploitative. The way salty-sweet comedy TURN ME ON, DAMMIT! treats the hormone-addled turmoil of its 15-year-old heroine Alma (Helene Bergsholm) feels something close to revolutionary. I don't want to overburden this mild-mannered 76-minute Norwegian debut, but it's true. --Alison Wilmore, Movieline

Fundamentally a wry, affectionate small-town movie, but one that sneaks up on a genuine feminist issue. Boys Alma's age are expected to be sex-obsessed, but a girl who yearns for action is relentlessly stigmatized, even in the context of a supposedly nurturing and tolerant social democracy. Alma escapes (very briefly) to the bohemian freedom of the big city and scores a modest victory against repression and hypocrisy, but it's one female libertines everywhere (and their companions) can embrace. --Andrew O'Hehir, Salon

Funny, embarrassing and poignant without ever seeming leering or exploitative. The way salty-sweet comedy TURN ME ON, DAMMIT! treats the hormone-addled turmoil of its 15-year-old heroine Alma (Helene Bergsholm) feels something close to revolutionary. I don't want to overburden this mild-mannered 76-minute Norwegian debut, but it's true. --Alison Wilmore, Movieline

Fundamentally a wry, affectionate small-town movie, but one that sneaks up on a genuine feminist issue. Boys Alma's age are expected to be sex-obsessed, but a girl who yearns for action is relentlessly stigmatized, even in the context of a supposedly nurturing and tolerant social democracy. Alma escapes (very briefly) to the bohemian freedom of the big city and scores a modest victory against repression and hypocrisy, but it's one female libertines everywhere (and their companions) can embrace. --Andrew O'Hehir, Salon

Customer Reviews

If Oscars were awarded for such stares, she'd win one.
Steven Mason
The delicate subject is handled with great sensitivity, and the film's understated message is a positive one.
Tsuyoshi
Well, for starters, because that gives us boys something to talk about.
E. Lee Zimmerman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By B. W. Brown on August 8, 2012
Format: DVD
Finally here is a wonderful film about the trials and tribulations of a teenage girl and her desire. It's really no wonder that the critics (94% Certified Fresh Rating at Rotten Tomatoes) have warmly embraced "Turn Me On Dammit" because there really is no american film like it. The originality the critics have embraced is based on the fresh perspective of the director (a woman of course) who gracefully tells the story of a teenage girl who struggles with her sexual fustrations and her relationships. I encourage all women (and everyone else) to check out this fresh take on growing up as a teenage girl. As a teenager it does not matter if you are a woman or a man because this is an experience that is universal.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Robert G. Splaine Jr. on June 28, 2012
Format: DVD
A teenage girl struggles with an obsessive sexual nature in this Norwegian film. She becomes an outcast in her school, and the mother is concerned about her daughter's odd behavior. This movie portrays real-life problems that kids have to deal with in any nation, so American kids should appreciate it. The movie approaches the borderline of inappropriate content without crossing it. These could be high school girls in any movie made here in American film, as they deal with peer pressure, sex, and trying to fit in with their classmates. This is a good movie for those that like to see quality foreign films.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Z Hayes HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 3, 2013
Format: DVD
In the opening scene of this refreshing movie that addresses adolescent sexuality from a girl's perspective, the lead character, Alma (Helene Bergscholm) , a 15-year-old teenager, is lying on a kitchen table and pleasuring herself to phone sex. This sets the scene for the rest of the movie which explores Alma's desires, her raging hormones, and her sexual awakening. (Note: The film is in Norwegian with English subtitles as an option, and there are some explicit scenes).

Alma's sexual escapades are explored with unabashed frankness, and the sex scenes are credibly dealt with. Alma's hormones are depicted as being totally off kilter to the point that sex is all she thinks about, "I want a hammer inside of me..." You get the picture. But then an encounter with a local boy changes things in Alma's life and she becomes the talk of the town, and not in a good way. The local kids call her "Dick Alma", and the girl becomes a social pariah.

It might be a bit shocking for some viewers because this is after all a 15-year-old girl who is depicted smoking hash cigarettes and drinking alcohol, but the issues dealt with are very real, and are explored in a realistic, down-to-earth manner. This film is very different to what one comes across in Hollywood films. Movies like American Pie dealt with adolescent sexuality from a boy's point of view, and a slew of Hollywood movies have explored the subject, but mainly from the male perspective. This is why "Turn Me On, Dammit!" is unique, as it doesn't shy away from portraying female sexuality with a level of candidness not common in American cinema. There's drama and humor aplenty, and the wonderful performance by the lead actress makes this a noteworthy production well-worth one's time.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. Lee Zimmerman TOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 25, 2012
Format: DVD
Boys will be boys, but, so far as this boy is concerned, I'm forever glad that girls will be girls. Why? Well, for starters, because that gives us boys something to talk about. Generally speaking, I find it much easier to strike up a conversation with a girl than I do a guy. And, in point of fact, if there were no girls, there would eventually be no boys, either! So ... delving into the mind of the fairer sex shouldn't be all that frightening or treacherous. It can be downright refreshing, especially if TURN ME ON, DAMMIT! is any indication.

(Note: the following review will contain minor spoilers solely for the discussion of plot and characters. If you want a spoiler-free assessment, you can head on down to the final two paragraphs. There. You've been warned.)

Alma (played by Helene Bergsholm) isn't your typical teen in a small Norwegian town. All of a sudden, she's blossoming into womanhood, and, as a consequence, her raging young hormones are causing her to daydream endlessly about sex ... and boys ... and more sex. To pass the time of day, she's taken to encounters of phone sex with the local service hotline. However, a chance encounter with the latest apple of her eye's affections, young Artur (Matias Myren), leads her to a curious predicament: after he tries to put his ... well, his ... his "thing" on her thigh, she can't help but share the lewd details with her two best friends. But when Artur denies it, Alma finds herself the subject of scorn, harassment, and ridicule by the entire town.

What's a growing girl to do?

Writer/director Jannicke Systad Jacobsen has assembled a delightful coming-of-age tale that breaks the mold by doing the unthinkable: focusing on the girls.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tsuyoshi on September 3, 2013
Format: DVD
Primarily a coming-of-age comedy, "Turn Me On, Dammit!" is an engaging little film (only 76 minutes) from Norway. Seldom does a film capture the frustrated feelings of the teenage girls stuck in a stagnant community, without making the story preachy or depressing.

The story itself is simple. It is about a 15-year-old girl Alma (Helene Bergsholm), bored with life in a fictional Norwegian rural town Skoddeheimen. Alma is frequently daydreaming about sexual situations, especially that with her friend Artur (Matias Myren), with whom she has a crush on.

Because of one shocking incident that happened during a dance party (related to sex, of course), Alma is virtually ostracized in school. Only her best friend Sara (Malin Bjørhovde), frequently writing letters to death row inmates in Texas, seems to understand her plight.

Alma (and we) is finally given an opportunity to look at the whole things from a different perspective. Though some may find the conclusion too good to be true, I think it is very realistic. Though "Turn Me On, Dammit!" is about heterosexual love, its light-hearted tone (with the story and characters firmly rooted in reality) reminds me of a Swedish masterpiece "Show Me Love."

There is nothing exploitative about Alma's sexual fantasy. The delicate subject is handled with great sensitivity, and the film's understated message is a positive one.
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