Turn! Turn! Turn!

April 30, 1996 | Format: MP3

$9.99
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3:29
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2:29
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2:34
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3:03

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 30, 1996
  • Release Date: April 30, 1996
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:09
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138J1BC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,783 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
29
4 star
11
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See all 42 customer reviews
The B-Side of "Turn! Turn! Turn!"
Tom
The only thing that keeps this from being a great "rock" record is the inclusion of some straight-ahead folk songs executed in a very understated matter.
OperablePig
In this case, the bonus tracks add some true delights to the experience as some alternative versions are even better than the original album cuts.
J. Bynum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Bud Sturguess on December 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
To quote the original liner notes of The Byrds' second album, "Protests growled briefly and died in great, wheezing gasps. The Byrds, unfettered, looked the other way and sang love songs." In 1965, America was beginning to enter a time of vehement political and social division and if anyone was looking for a song that flawlessly described the time, the title track of this album was a Godsend...literally. Originally taken by Pete Seeger from the 3rd chapter of Ecclesiastes in the Bible, 'Turn! Turn! Turn!' was such a powerful anthem for all involved in the social unrest--both weary politicians and youths burning their draft cards--that the other songs on the album did not need to consist of other political messages. The Byrds decided one anthem was enough, and filled "Turn! Turn! Turn!" with great songs about love and searches for personal enlightenment.

The group's debut "Mr. Tambourine Man" had been largely carried by vocalist Gene Clark's creative originals, and four Bob Dylan covers among others. Clark's songs also carry "Turn! Turn! Turn!" when it comes to the creative output of the bandmembers, but Roger (Jim) McGuinn was establishing himself as the counterpart to Clark's work. The love songs he co-wrote, 'It Won't Be Wrong' and 'Wait and See' (co-authored by budding Byrd David Crosby) were not up to the standards of those set by Gene Clark, but his arranging of folk standards and 12-string Rickenbacker playing show his influence. McGuinn brilliantly turns an old folk song 'He Was A Friend Of Mine' into a beautiful lament for John F. Kennedy, the additional lyrics McGuinn added delicately describing the tragic assassination of a president. Also a nice move is the jangle of 'Oh Susannah,' which features great interplay between McGuinn's Rickenbacker and Michael Clarke's drum kit.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Music fan in the Midwest on June 24, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a 2012 release from Sony Japan geared for the Japan market. The 27-track remastered edition of the Byrds' second album uses Blu-Spec manufacturing technology but the disc plays fine on a standard CD player.

I'm no audiophile, nor do I play one on TV, but as far as the audio quality of this disc goes, to my ears it sounds as good as the 1996 Sony Legacy remaster. As I pointed out in my earlier review of Sony Japan's release of The Notorious Byrd Brothers, an audiophile with a high-end sound system who knows what to listen for might be able to hear or observe in this new edition nuances that I am unable to detect, and I would respect that person's findings. I'm simply saying that if you have a dependable but "garden variety" sound system like mine, you may be hard-pressed to find the audio quality of this new disc superior to that of the 1996 remaster. They both sound great.

That said, there are important distinctions to be made between these two quality CD editions released 16 years apart.

1996 TTT: has just the stereo mix; I had only it to A/B with the 2012 edition's stereo mix; that's because the . . .
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By (KKC) M. S. Artaxerxes Dionysus on January 10, 2006
Format: Audio CD
'Turn! Turn! Turn!' is the Byrds' second album, & featured the title track, their second & last US #1 single. The rest of the album follows the formula laid down the same year by their debut album, 'Mr. Tambourine Man', though somewhere, this second album is a bit more flawed, which is only understandable due to the hectic conditions under which it was created.

The title track is as wonderful a Byrdesque folk-rock song as any, fully reprising the glory of 'Mr. Tambourine Man', not only commercially, but also artistically.

'It Won't Be Wrong' is another folk-rock classic, whose intro sounds anticipate the coming of psychedelia a few years later. Later the song changes pace & returns to the original speed again later. All in all as great a Byrd song as any on their debut album.

'Set You Free This Time' sets their strongest lyric so far (those covered from Dylan not included), to a tune that marks a slight step down from the previous two songs, but not enough to prevent this from being one of their most underrated gems.

'Lay Down Your Weary Tune' is one of the group's best Dylan-interpretations, and, like all of those, it is hard not to think of it as a Byrds-original. An already strong song loses nothing of its beauty, but is presented in the full grace of folk-rock.

The traditional 'He Was A Friend Of Mine' is buoyed by a great, twangling acoustic guitar, but otherwise the song becomes somewhat tedious in the long run, though it isn't at all bad, and doesn't seem out of place on the album.

'The World Turns All Around Her' is a pure Byrds-classic, complete with the title, a perfect blend of tortured romanticism & mind-altering psychedelia.
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