Buy Used
$2.97
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: A book with obvious wear. May have some damage to the cover or binding but integrity is still intact. There might be writing in the margins, possibly underlining and highlighting of text, but no missing pages or anything that would compromise the legibility or understanding of the text.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Turner (Basic Art) Paperback – May 17, 2000


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, May 17, 2000
"Please retry"
$8.95 $2.97
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Basic Art
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Taschen (May 17, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3822863254
  • ISBN-13: 978-3822863251
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #973,592 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Bockemühl (b. 1943) studied art history, philosophy and ecclesiastical history in Munich and Bochum. He qualified as a professor in 1984 at the Ruhr University, and lecturered in the history of the art of late antiquity, the Middle Ages and the early modern age. In 1990 he was awarded a chair in the science of art, aesthetics and art education by Witten Herdecke University. His TASCHEN monographs include Rembrandt (1991) and William Turner (1991).

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Giordano Bruno on February 4, 2011
Verified Purchase
Most of the small, inexpensive Taschen art books are delightful -- well printed and well written -- but this one fails on both counts. I'm not really surprised that the paintings and water colors of J.M.W Turner don't comes across in this small format; the luminous transparency of his colors and the textures of his pigments simply defy photography and lithography. The most I hoped for was that the reproductions would stir my memories of Turner's works that I've seen in London, Berlin, and Philadelphia. But I wanted more from the text. Turner is an amazing phenomenon if you consider his dates: born in 1775, most of his best work done before 1840, died in 1851. For a comparison, Monet was born in 1840, Renoir in 1841. Turner's range of affect was astonishing, from paintings as dire as Goya's to impressionism to incipient abstraction, and all breathtakingly polished in technique. I wanted to know something of his life, of his mode of living and painting, of his mind. The text by Michael Bockemühl may have some of that information in it, but it's insufferably over-written and impenetrably disorganized. Even supposing that it's a translation from German done by a native Tibetan speaker with a degree in the philosophy of Schopenhauer from a University in Albania, I couldn't keep my eyes focused on the phrases long enough to extract anything meaningful from this pompous rambling.
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Austin on April 9, 2010
My first serious look at Turner. The 2010 reprint is not the original plates of the text, but rather has been scanned (!). Nonetheless, I found this text clear, forthright, enlightened and enlightening. The author speaks directly to the sense of what 'painting', and 'color' are about. There is a fine explanation of the difficulty of 'freezing time' in action or more so in seascapes. The text proposes an understanding of the borderline between color that re-presents an object (through a two-dimensional imaging of it), and the 'color' representation of the object. There is also an interesting discussion on the distortion of perspective, as well as the 'problem' of a painting being presented from multiple perspectives at the same time.

From a 'simple' reading of the text, I would have taken it to be an introduction to late-nineteenth century issues. A painter who in some senses was far ahead of his time. Think "late-Beethoven quartets". His painting engages, or it doesn't. In the way that Rothko engages, or doesn't, Turner lays the foundation for this possibility of multiple representations.

A good basic introduction in about 100 images taken from the over 18,000 that are catalogued.

A fascinating journey, and a book that has led me to acquire more books about Turner. For those with a musical bent, the composers to listen to while viewing will be Mendelssohn for the early architecture, and R Strauss for the early landscapes. Chabrier and Scriabin for middle and later works, and color-field composers such as Mort Feldman for the paintings that are more color and light at the end of his career.

For $10 or $15 ... a great deal.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G. Meissner on March 21, 2012
Verified Purchase
Beaufiful, colorful depictions of this artist's work. It has been very useful to me as a painter. The text really helps to give an understanding of the way Turner composed his art, and the ways in which he inspired Monet.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. William J. Walter on March 24, 2013
Verified Purchase
I say that I love this book, and I do but not many of Turner's works would I want on my walls. Most of his seascapes are too restrained and mystical for my taste, having spent some years at sea. The book is informative and inviting to deeper thought. My favourite reproduction by far is "The Passage of the St Gotthard" 1804. There is life and movement and human endeavour in it.
W.J. Walter
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 31 people found the following review helpful By harsil on June 2, 2003
This book is basically unreadable. Impenetrable metaphysical terminology is used in dense, convoluted sentences to convey abstruse theories of meaning (at least I think that's what it is) in such a way as to be completely and utterly opaque. Half the time I didn't know what the guy was talking about, and I have a degree in this stuff and belong to Mensa. If you're interested in Turner, you'd do better to look elsewhere.
Some good reproductions though, and if you're just interested in the pictures, the price is right. Hence the two stars; the text would be zero, since it's useless.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?