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Turning Two: My Journey to the Top of the World and Back with the New York Mets Hardcover – April 10, 2012


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Turning Two: My Journey to the Top of the World and Back with the New York Mets + Gil Hodges: The Brooklyn Bums, the Miracle Mets, and the Extraordinary Life of a Baseball Legend
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; First Edition edition (April 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312662408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312662400
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,082,402 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“With the mess still continuing in Queens, relive the Mets' glory days with this autobiography of Bud Harrelson (written with legendary NYC sportswriter Phil Pepe), who was in the orange and blue for both of the team's World Series wins: as a shortstop in 1969 and as a coach in '86.”—am New York

"He’s a New York baseball icon...I love him to death."—Darryl Strawberry, from the foreword 

“Harrelson, who will forever be known in baseball history as the man Pete Rose barreled into during the 1973 National League Championship Series, igniting a brawl that whipped the crowd at Shea Stadium into a trash-throwing frenzy, retraces his baseball career and reminisces about his time with baseball legends such as Casey Stengel, Tom Seaver (his friend and longtime roommate), and Willie Mays. … As a scrappy, scrawny shortstop for the New York Mets, he made two All-Star teams and won a World Series in 1969. Harrelson grabbed another championship in 1986 as a Mets’ coach. … Harrelson’s amiable appreciation for his life in baseball makes the book a safe bet for youngsters.” – Publishers Weekly

About the Author

BUD HARRELSON played in the Major Leagues from 1965 to 1980 and retired second on the all-time list of games played for the New York Mets. He was a member of the Mets coaching staff from 1985 to 1990 and served as Mets manager in 1990 and 1991. He lives in Long Island and is co-owner and senior vice president for baseball operations for the Long Island Ducks, a team in the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball. Harrelson was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1986.

PHIL PEPE has reported on sports in New York for more than five decades and has authored more than fifty books, most of them on baseball.


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Bud does not want to offend anyone so instead he offends the reader by wasting his time.
Mathew E. Hoffman
A lot of what he wrote about almost every die-hard Met fan knows, but he expands on events such as the fight with Pete Rose and being in the World Series.
Marie A
It is easy reading, fast moving and interesting insight into the life of the little shortstop with the great heart.
Peter Hyatt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By F. Melchor on July 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I was born in 1962 and although my Dad was an avid Cleveland Indians fan I didn't pay enough attention to MLB until the first game of the '69 World Series. I presume the primary reason was that games weren't regularly on TV back then. I watched a portion of the game with my Dad and became a Mets fan in the process. 7 year olds are quite impressionable. Two of my brothers (aged 8 and 5 became Oriole fans. Beyond picking a team based upon uniform, I picked Bud Harrelson as my favorite player. He was far from the most dramatic player on the field but he was small and played shortstop and somehow I related to him. I remained a Mets fan for a number of years until I grew into the Tribe fan I am today but didn't give up my affinity to Bud. His '71 Topps baseball card was one of my favorites. Regardless, I was pleasantly surprised to find this new book recently and read it quickly. It was fun to read Bud's version of so many playoff and World series games that I remember (more so of the '73 postseason).

I do concur with another reviewer that even more in depth sharing would have been great but I greatly enjoyed what was shared nonetheless. The Rose fisticuffs, the Bosox dugout behavior with 2 outs in Game 6, the toe stepping with Mays, the description of Hodges and Hondo Howard, the rubber arm of McGraw, grabbing the glove before fans did, the different personalities of Strawberry and Gooden, frustrating Bob Gibson, making fun of himself in a fun manner, recognizing all he was blessed with was actually result of hard work, etc. was all interesting.

All in all an enjoyable read that allows you to remember affectionately a simpler time in baseball or for someone to be introduced to same. For those of us who remember these games, it's so interesting to reading Bud's version.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By William DiMarco on May 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
"Turning Two" by Bud Harrelson is an interesting book, especially for Mets fans. It's good; however, it could've been a little better. Harrelson goes over his life & career, focusing on major events & individuals like the '69 championship season, manager Gil Hodges, his roommate Tom Seaver & his brawl with Pete Rose in the 1973 NLCS. I've been a Mets fan for over 40 years & know a lot of facts already, but I learned some things like Oriole players such as Frank Robinson & Don Buford dismissing the Mets' chances before & during the 1969 World Series. His insights into his hero & mentor Hodges & Seaver were very good too. Harrelson was a bit of a hero of mine back then, an extremely likeable fellow & it shows in the book with his droll self-depreciating observations. He's in the Mets Hall Of Fame & deservedly so. However, I must say, there were some mistakes that I picked up reading through my own knowledge (Bruce Hurst not going to start Game 7 of the '86 Series on 2 days rest, Terry Pendleton's backbreaking HR in 1987 was a 2-run HR, not 3, final out of '73 NLCS vs. Reds was not a comebacker to Tug McGraw, etc). That took away from it, plus Bud didn't talk about his family life at all, except for growing up, which I didn't get. Also, he could've gone into more depth into his disasterous (no other way to put it, I'm sorry) one & half year stint as Mets manager. That was given too short attention, in my view. Maybe it was too painful to delve deeply into for him. In addition, he could've expounded on his new career as Long Island Ducks part-owner, first manager & home games first base coach a bit more, a truly great thing he helped do for the people in that area. Anyway, as stated, this was a good read for baseball fans, Mets especially. Too bad it couldn't have been firmed up in some areas though.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mathew E. Hoffman on August 31, 2012
Format: Hardcover
After all these years if you are going to write a book about the 1960-1990s Mets you should have something new to say. So, it was with great eagerness that i grabbed a book by Buddy Harrelson. No doubt it would be filled with new insights, behind the scenes tales, a new approach. Sadly, this book has none of that. We have seen this all before. Heard all this before. There is nothing here I found that you could not have gotten from reading a newspaper. In fact, there is less since there are errors. This is an ex-jock book. Bud does not want to offend anyone so instead he offends the reader by wasting his time.
Read Golenbock instead.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a story telling account written for baseball fans; particularly, NY Mets fans who appreciate the magic of the Amazin' Mets by one of the most popular of all the players, Buddy Harrelson.

It is easy reading, fast moving and interesting insight into the life of the little shortstop with the great heart. From his Little League saga, to rooming with Hall of Famer Tom Seaver, Harrelson has captured a moment in time precious to many of us, in a simple and enjoyably light manner.

Another must read for fans of the New York Mets.
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By Marie A on September 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
at a local baseball dinner earlier this year. Mr. Harrelson autographed the book and we enjoyed chatting with him and seeing his 1986 World Series ring. A lot of what he wrote about almost every die-hard Met fan knows, but he expands on events such as the fight with Pete Rose and being in the World Series. This book is a must for anyone who was a Mets fan during Bud Harrelson's playing and coaching days with the Mets.
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