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A Pony For Keeps (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) (Pony Pals) School & Library Binding – January 1, 1995


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School & Library Binding, January 1, 1995

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Series: Pony Pals (Book 2)
  • School & Library Binding: 90 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback (January 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785759697
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785759690
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,380,327 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jeanne Betancourt grew up in rural Vermont, where she spent a lot of time playing on the dairy farm across the road from her family's apartment. At the time she had no intention of becoming a writer -- she took tap dancing classes and dreamed of becoming a Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall. Her rural upbringing would later provide ideas and background for many of her books.
After college and three years teaching in Vermont, Jeanne moved to New York City, where she taught junior and high school, and earned a masters degree in film studies from New York University. She wrote her first children's book in 1982, and since then has written a wide variety of acclaimed fiction and nonfiction books for young readers. Betancourt drew on her own memories and dreams while writing Kate's Turn, which focuses on a young teen's pursuit of a dance career; her own experience with dyslexia helped her create the title character of My Name Is Brian. And her rural upbringing, of course, helped her create the popular Pony Pals series.
Pony Pal fans are encouraged to visit ClubPonyPals.com to play games, make friends with other Pony Pals around the world, and enter a virtual Pony Pal world where they can ride with the Pony Pals.
Jeanne has written 76 books for children and young adults. Her most recent book is Ava Tree And The Wishes Three (Feiwel and Friends, Macmillan).
In addition to writing, Jeanne also loves to draw and paint. Her other interests include biking, and gardening. She still loves to dance.
In addition to writing books, Betancourt has also written for television, and has received six Emmy Award nominations, two Humanities citations, and the National Psychological Award for Excellence in the Media.
For more about Jeanne check out her website jeannebetancourt.com and her Facebook page.
She divides her time between an apartment in New York City and a home in Orient, New York.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Okay, this is from the same person who wrote a previous review. A couple of reviews down. Anyway, I am twelve and I might be a little old to be reviewing a pony pal book, (I still secretly kinda like them) but the fact that the most recent reviewer obviously has no idea what they are talking about (in my opinion) is kind of bothering me. First of all, why don't people get the fact that ponies and horses are different because ponies are generally smaller than horses, but just because they are ponies, it doesn't mean that they are automatically small. (Read my previous review.) Second of all, just because someone is ten years old, it doesn't mean that they still can't fit on a pony. I take riding lessons and I am twelve years old. And to this day, I have never ridden a true horse. Just ponies. And I am not a puny person. I am above average in height and about average in weight so I'm no slimjim. Ponies are 14.2 hands or under and that is bigger than you think it is. Thirdly, Acorn shouldn't get his way all the time. It could be dangerous! I really hope that whoever wrote the previous review didn't truly believe that. I ride a difficult PONY during lessons and if I let him get his way all the time, I would have gotten hurt and so would other riders or their ponies and horses. Don't get me wrong, I would never, under any circumstances hurt a horse or pony. I sometimes hesitate to use a crop even when my instructors tell me it's alright. There's a difference between firm but kind and mean and creul. Lastly, the previous reviewer was wrong to call my previous review nasty. If it was her opinion that it was good and cool that ponies "leap" then it was her opinion. On the other hand, it was MY opinion that that was incorrect and sorta funny.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
I just want to clear some confusion about a previous review. The reviewer obviously knows little or nothing at all about horses. First of all, if Anna had let Acorn do what he wants, then he could have put both Anna and himself in danger. I mean, think about it. Remember when Acorn started charging up Snow White's back? If Snow White wasn't such a well behaved pony, then she probably would have kicked Acorn. This could have resulted in Acorn getting sore and Anna getting bucked off. Second of all, horses are not measured in hands literally. Each "hand" is equal to four inches. So if a horse is 16 hands, then he would be 64 inches tall at the withers. Thirdly, there is a difference between horses and ponies. A horse under 14.2 hands is considered a pony. Lastly, I don't mean to be a nitpicker, but you do not "leap" a pony or horse over a jump. You jump! I mean come on. Leaping a pony. That is funny.

But this book was another good installment in the Pony Pal series.

Just as a last note, that review was a "poor excuse" of a review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andrew W. Johns VINE VOICE on October 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
This was the second Pony Pals book that my daughter (age 7) and I read together, and I found it to be an impressive book. Not only is it entertaining for young readers, but it also provides an age appropriate discussion of learning disabilities.

Anna is struggling with her school work, and her parents have decided that her pony is too much of a distraction. Since she can't seem to improve her grades, they decide to return her pony to the stable. By chance, Anna makes a new friend who teaches her about dyslexia, and suggests that Anna might have a similar learning disability. With the help of her friends, Anna is able to convince her parents that she has been doing her best, and that she needs extra help.

This story has a happy ending, and it should help young readers understand a bit about learning disabilities. A wonderful combination.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
I think Anna is a really smart girl. She knows that ponies can't be allowed to do just what they want to do, the rider is in charge! That way the pony (or horse) and rider will get along. My cousin and I live on farms with ponies (and horses...there is a difference!) and, just like Anna, we know that the pony must be kept under control. Otherwise it's no fun! I just want to ask something. My cousin has two Shetland ponies who are really small-and full grown! We're both nine years old and I'm starting to out-grow Mona, my welsh pony. So how can the Pony Pals still be perfect for their ponies? Especially Anna? All in all, a great book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Okay, this is from the same person who wrote a previous review. A couple of reviews down. Anyway, I am twelve and I might be a little old to be reviewing a pony pal book, (I still secretly kinda like them) but the fact that the most recent reviewer obviously has no idea what they are talking about (in my opinion) is kind of bothering me. First of all, why don't people get the fact that ponies and horses are different because ponies are generally smaller than horses, but just because they are ponies, it doesn't mean that they are automatically small. (Read my previous review.) Second of all, just because someone is ten years old, it doesn't mean that they still can't fit on a pony. I take riding lessons and I am twelve years old. And to this day, I have never ridden a true horse. Just ponies. And I am not a puny person. I am above average in height and about average in weight so I'm no slimjim. Ponies are 14.2 hands or under and that is bigger than you think it is. Thirdly, Acorn shouldn't get his way all the time. It could be dangerous! I really hope that whoever wrote the previous review didn't truly believe that. I ride a difficult PONY during lessons and if I let him get his way all the time, I would have gotten hurt and so would other riders or their ponies and horses. Don't get me wrong, I would never, under any circumstances hurt a horse or pony. I sometimes hesitate to use a crop even when my instructors tell me it's alright. There's a difference between firm but kind and mean and creul. Lastly, the previous reviewer was wrong to call my previous review nasty. If it was her opinion that it was good and cool that ponies "leap" then it was her opinion. On the other hand, it was MY opinion that that was incorrect and sorta funny.Read more ›
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