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Twentieth-Century Type, New and Revised Edition Paperback – June 10, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Revised edition (June 10, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300100736
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300100730
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #819,562 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This book steps back from the usual typographic discussions found in style and design manuals and places type in the context of the larger social and cultural movements that influenced and were influenced by it, from the Arts and Crafts movement of William Morris to deconstruction in our own time. Beautifully illustrated, carefully researched, and eloquently presented, this volume traces type decade by decade through the turbulence of the century and the rapid changes in technology and viewpoint that repeatedly threatened to degrade the craft and from which it always emerged fresh and vital. Recommended for all graphic arts and larger art collections. See also Robert Bringhurst's The Elements of Typographic Style and Alex White's Type in Use , reviewed below.--Ed.
- Mark Woodhouse, Elmira Coll. Lib., N.Y.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Lewis Blackwell is International Creative Director at Tony Stone Images. Formerly publisher and editor of Creative Review, his books include The End of Print (2000); David Carson, 2nd Sight: Grafik Design After the End of Print (1997), and (with Neville Brody) G1: New Dimensions in Graphic Design (1997).

More About the Author

Lewis Blackwell likes to make beautiful books with inspiring ideas. Whether it is his passion for trees, which led to the bestselling Life and Love of Trees (celebrated on the Ellen DeGeneres Show and featured on oprah.com, among others) or more arcane delights in the history of typography and vernacular signage (20th Century Type and Ed Fella Letters on America), or sharing his powerful insights from the top table in photography (Photowisdom), the resulting books are always highly visual, original in thought and word, and accessible.
Lewis finds the perfect project for a book typically combines a great subject to investigate with fascinating people to work with and remarkable places to visit. He is currently working on two projects that will take him around the world, from the depths of nature to the heights of technology.


To write to Lewis Blackwell, or to request him for talks or signings, please email him via his publishers at contact@pqblackwell.com

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By meagainstme on September 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a great book containing a very good overview of the 20th century changes in typography. It covers everything from pre-art nouveau to postmodernism. A good resource for any design or typography library. My only complaint is that Blackwell waxes a bit too poetic on 1990's postmodernism. Also, they used a tight-fitting Helvetica for the body copy - so reading it takes some effort.

This is certainly worth having in your collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pen Name and That A on May 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book has one chapter for each decade of the 20th century and a collection of fonts at the end of the book. There are a couple of pages on the anatomy of a font, too. Each chapter consists of a chat about the important fonts of the centry and how and why they were developed. The accompanying pictures tend to be of book covers and advertising. There are samples of many of the fonts throughout the book, too.

There is alot of assumed knowlege in this book. I did not understand most of the printing or font terminology and the terms I wondered about tended not to be in the glossary. Perhaps because I did not start off knowing much about the fonts, the information/chat just seemed to be thrown down. There were no specific exmples or illustrations of how fonts that were derived from each other differed from each other.

Arial was not mentioned in the book or the index. How interesting that a book might be intersting because of what is left out of it. A quick check of the net revealed to me that Arial is uncool because it is a Microsoft loyalties-dodge rip of Helvetica. Everyone on the net seems to prefer Helvetica. Well, even before I knew about this controversy (i.e. 10 minutes ago), I MUCH preferred Arial over Helvetica. It was as if every letter was different. Well, it just goes to show the difference a small change can make. Now I recon that Helvetica is way too uptight compared to Arial. So there.

P.S. No cudos for the authors for dodging the Arial/Helvetica issue. I recon it illustrates what an enormous difference a small difference can make to the vibe of a font. Isn't that a cool thing to have illustrated to one?
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Pen Name and That A on May 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has one chapter for each decade of the 20th century and a collection of fonts at the end of the book. There are a couple of pages on the anatomy of a font, too. Each chapter consists of a chat about the important fonts of the centry and how and why they were developed. The accompanying pictures tend to be of book covers and advertising. There are samples of many of the fonts throughout the book, too.

There is alot of assumed knowlege in this book. I did not understand most of the printing or font terminology and the terms I wondered about tended not to be in the glossary. Perhaps because I did not start off knowing much about the fonts, the information/chat just seemed to be thrown down. There were no specific exmples or illustrations of how fonts that were derived from each other differed from each other.

Many of the picture captions were run together so it was hard to work out where the caption for a particular picture came from. The book was written in a sans serif font, too. How come professionals are the ones to break the rules? That's a common reason scuba divers drown, but here it's the hapless reader who flunders about.

Arial was not mentioned in the book or the index. How interesting that a book might be intersting because of what is left out of it. A quick check of the net revealed to me that Arial is uncool because it is a Microsoft loyalties-dodge rip of Helvetica. Everyone on the net seems to prefer Helvetica. Well, even before I knew about this controversy (i.e. 10 minutes ago), I MUCH preferred Arial over Helvetica. It was as if every letter was different. Well, it just goes to show the difference a small change can make. Now I recon that Helvetica is way too uptight compared to Arial. So there.

P.S.
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