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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on November 4, 2000
Format: DVD
Just a quick note: I don't think some of the reviewers have paid attention. There are criticisms to Jackie Chan as director. Well, two notes: 1) He did not directed this movie 2) Most of the best Jackie Chan movies have been directed by him. He has been recognized as an excellent director.
Anyway, this movie was done for the construction of some association for directors from Hong Kong, and that explains why the multiple directors. Jackie Chan has said he is not satisfied with the final result of the movie.
But don't be scared. This is an excellent comedy, using the old joke about mixed identities. It is not heavy on the action side, but includes some nice fight scenes, including a final shutdown at a facility for testing cars.
If you are looking for one Chan movie, there are better ones to select for starters (Supercop, Operation Condor, Rumble in the Bronx). But if you are a die hard fan, you will want to take a look at "Twin Dragons".
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 8, 2003
Format: DVDVerified Purchase
1 star is not to the movie - movie itself is one of my favorites - but for the US edition.
Some idiots are cutting all the time LARGE parts of Jackie Chan movies for the US. Does anybody know why? I think they just hate Jackie Chan and don't want to others enjoy his performance as well.
In the US edition of "Rumble in the Bronx" they deleted the entire love line (it may surprised some people, but there are 2 of them in the full version).
So, if you like Jackie movies, avoid this edition and try to get the Hong Kong one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 25, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
To review a Jackie Chan film is to admit that one has too much time on one's hands. A more futile gesture is hard to imagine: I doubt anyone has ever decided whether or not to see a Chan movie based on anything so trivial as a review or critique, and with good reason: Chan's track record speaks for itself. Over the past three decades, he's churned out dozens of martial arts extravaganzas which have delighted audiences all over the world, making him one of Asia's biggest (and richest) stars. Chan fans, a group I count myself part of, go to see his films not because of their breathtaking intellect, but because we enjoy seeing the Master kick a little ass, and make us laugh while he does so. Who cares what the critics think?
Chan is a rare breed: a hybrid who possesses not only stunning physical grace but also a sly streak of self-depreciating humor-- he's not one of those buff Ah-nold clones, and that's part of his appeal: he looks like "everyman," and his characters use their wits (and a dash of good ol' dumb luck) to pull themselves out of the dire situations they continuously find themselves in. In that regard, his performances parallel the great silent comedians of cinema's earliest days: both Chaplin and Buster Keaton are acknowledged by Chan as major influences.
The plot of "Twin Dragons," made in 1992 but just released in America, consists of the usual silliness: some bad guys are running around Hong Kong, and only some tightly-edited kung-fu and astonishing stunt work by Chan can make the streets safe again. The twist this time is that Jackie plays two roles, a pair of identical twin brothers separated at birth. One grows up to be a master martial artist named Boomer, a tough guy raised in the hard streets of Hong Kong. His twin, John Ma, is a revered classical pianist and conductor, educated in the finest schools and possessing no martial arts ability. Having no prior knowledge of each other's existence, both men are soon mistaken for their twin, leading to some predictable but amusing fish-out-of-water comedy (Boomer being forced to conduct a symphony orchestra (one of Chan's all-time great comedic scenes), the wimpy Ma being forced to duke it out with the bad guys, etc.)
It's silly to even consider commenting on the story itself; the dialogue and obligatory love tangents (one of which features Maggie Cheung, Chan's co-star in "Supercop") are here only to give the action sequences something to alternate with. Suffice it to say that this isn't "Casablanca," nor is it intended to be. It succeeds at what it attempts to do: take the audience on a wild ride through some hilarious and tense moments, with barely a moment to catch one's breath. It's a winner on two levels: this is not only the tightest Chan movie I've yet seen... it's also the funniest.
The only major disappointment with "Twin Dragons" is the fact that there are no bloopers or outtakes attached to the final reel. (For those of you not in the know, Chan makes it a policy to include a number of humorous outtakes intermixed with the end credits of each of his movies, showing flubbed lines and stunts.) It's a long-standing tradition, and I'm perplexed as to why these were not included with this American release of the film. With such impressive stunts, the outtakes are no doubt fascinating.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format: VHS Tape
This is one of my favorite Chan movies. The whole film is played for laughs using the classic plot line of twins separated at birth who are reunited by accident as adults. The twins mix identities in many scenes leading to fish-out-of-water humor. I particularly enjoyed the scene in which the street-tough twin, Boomer, conducts an orchestra as a stand-in for the famed-musician twin, John Ma. Through his tremendous energy (and acrobatics), Boomer inspires a tepid orchestra to musical heights it has never known before. Another really funny scene is the battle in the Mitsubishi testing factory at the climax. Here, the theme of the twins-acting-as-one, which has brought laughs throughout the film, reaches its manic peak as Boomer helps martial-arts-impaired John Ma take down the villain. Both of these scenes, especially the one in the factory, are so hilarious, my kids and I were slapping each other on the back and howling with laughter.
For those who love Jackie's stunts, there are some amazing ones in this movie. One in particular blew me away: when he leaps through the window of a car feet first.
I also like very much that in Twin Dragons the women aren't just objects to be rescued from the villain, as happens with such annoying predictability in most action films. Instead, in this movie, something I've never seen before in quite this way, the rescue-object is Boomer's ridiculous male best-friend, a scrawny fool who's always in trouble, because he's addicted to baiting bad guys. Because Boomer's pal is such a manipulative little jerk, the audience can freely enjoy it when he frequently gets his comeuppance in the form of dumped-on-the-rear slapstick.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2003
Format: DVD
...If your interested in a REAL Jackie Chan movie, with REAL stunts, REAL comedy, REAL action, and REAL Jackie, look no further than TWIN DRAGONS.
It may not be entiely convincing that the twins are really together inframe (the split screen effects are as corny as they get) and the story may not be entirely original...but TWIN DRAGONS is nevertheless, one of the best Jackie Chan movies ever...
Jackie plays Boomer, womanizing, karate choppin' mechanic living in Hong Kong, and the brother he never kenw he had, reknown condutor John Ma. Ma arrives in Hong Kong to give a concert and things go completely cattewumpus. Ma knows kung fu about as well as Boomer knows how to conduct a concert
Boomer:P>Before long, bad guys have kidnapped Boomer's smart-...buddy Tyson (Teddy Robin, who also produced)...with all that to worry about, there's even girl trouble, when Ma's lady Tammy (Nina Li Chi) winds up in the sack with Boomer, believing him to be Ma, and lovely lounge singer Barbara (lovely Maggie Cheung) falls for Ma believing him to be Boomer.
The summary of TWIN DRAGONS plot simply does not do it justice. From the moment Boomer gets in a fight with an entire night club full of mobsters, the movie has already hit take off velocity. Fans of the sexy Maggie Cheung...will find she doesn't have much to do, but looks fabulous not doing it. This is only one of the movie's she's done with Jackie. off the the top of my head, I can name many others, but let it suffice to say that for action, comedy, and Maggie Cheung, Jackie Chan's TWIN DRAGONS can't lose.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 8, 2001
Format: DVD
I noticed that a reviewer here has "corrected" a previously posting reviewer who had stated that Jean Claude VanDamme's "Double Impact" was released before this film. Well, to clear this up, "Twin" was not released "in the 80's." "Twin Dragons" was released in Asia in 1992 and "Double Impact" was released in 1991. "A Viewer From" should make sure he/she knows what he/she is talking about before he/she rags on someone else.
More on-point:
"Twin Dragons" is a lot of fun. Is it a "good" movie? Well, the definition of "good" depends on whether you're already a fan of Jackie Chan's Hong Kong films or not. On a technical level, very few of them are "good", with goofy out-of-date stories, some very bad acting, and occasionally horrible dialog (even in the original Cantonese). BUT the vast majority of them are exceedingly enjoyable nonetheless. One of the unique aspects of Chan's HK films is that they are primitive in a modern world. Had they been made 30 years earlier, he would be considered a master of the art these days.
If you can accept that "TD" has a plot that has been done literaly dozens and dozens of times over the decades, by everyone from Jerry Lewis to Cheech and Chong to Patty Duke, then this film is a hilarious and exiting take on that formula.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on June 3, 2001
Format: DVD
I haven't as yet seen this DVD (I fully plan to as Jackie Chan dubbed on this release I am told). The 3 stars are for the movie itself. It is not the best Jackie Chan Hong Kong movie, the Police Story series and Project A 1 & 2 are much better but is definitely worth a look. I have seen an old dubbed version (OK) and the Asian DVD release (better). Before approaching any "old" Jackie Chan film (ie. ones done in Hong Kong before America!) viewers should be aware they are lower budgeted so don't have the capacity for special effects as in US movies. Also, what a Chinese considers funny might not necessarily be what a westerner thinks is funny! Keeping this in mind, I really liked this film. The story is "old" (ie. twins separated at birth and coming together later in life with the expected mix-ups) but with Jackie (twice!) it is a lot of fun. The last action scene in the car factory shows Jackie's amazing acrobatic and martial arts skills to perfection. If you are Hong Kong movie buff, there are a lot of cameo appearances by HK actors and directors. Jackie did not direct this film, so ignore any criticism of bad direction by him! Most of the films Jackie directed himself are superb action pieces, though the acting is not very good in some. Jackie is more interested in action than dialogue, though "Accidental Spy", his latest Asian release, is extremely good in all aspects, both action and action, with a good storyline. Anyway, give Twin Dragons a look - it will be worth it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 24, 1999
Format: DVD
Yes I shelled out cash to see this in the movie theatre and it was a fun flick.Twins separated at birth story line.Disney really cleaned up the film and audio quality,I know because I have the VHS of the original film.It isn't one of Jackies best films,but it is great fun.Don't know if the DVD or VHS that AMAZON is offering will have the outakes at the end of the flick,but to my major dissapointment(and the rest of the audiences too) there were no outtakes at the end of the film.Lets hope they put some in for the DVD/VHS release.It's a keeper for a Jackie Chan collector.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: DVD
What do you get when you take two of the best action directors in Hong Kong near the peak of their powers - Tsui Hark and Ringo Lam - add two Jackie Chans and throw in his Police Story co-star Maggie Cheung? A load of rubbish, unfortunately. Made as a fundraiser for the Hong Kong Directors' Guild, Twin Dragons was painful enough in its original 100-minute version, but rescored, redubbed and shorn of 15 minutes by scissor-happy Miramax offshoot Dimension Pictures it's gone from being a vaguely comprehensible bad picture to an almost completely incomprehensible even worse one.

It's the usual Corsican Brothers/mistaken identity plot (separated at birth, one twin grows up to be a streetwise hustler with an irritating sinus problem, the other an acclaimed conductor and concert pianist until - well, you know the rest), but thanks to perfunctory writing and tired unimaginative staging it's a bit of a chore to watch. Despite some good opening stunts it's mostly a rather inept comedy with a leaning towards bedroom farce, not helped by some variable special effects - at one point Chan walks through his brother's arm in a muffed process shot that really should have stayed on the cutting room floor but which typifies the "It'll do" spirit of the enterprise. As for the truly irritating vertically challenged sidekick - Randy Newman's Short People could have been written with him in mind.

There is one good (not great, just good) fight scene in and around various cars in a test laboratory, as well as a neat cameo by the two directors as cheating card players (John Woo also turns up in one shot as a priest), but it's definitely not enough for any but the Chan completists. As with all of Buena Vista's back-catalog of dubbed and re-edited HK releases there are no extras (though Chan does dub himself in the English-language version, whereas in the Hong Kong cut he's dubbed into Cantonese by another actor), but after seeing this, the only extra you'd be interested in is an apology. Of course, as you would expect with a turkey, the 2.35:1 transfer and sound are both very good.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2001
Format: DVD
Twin Dragons is fairly typical of the recent Jackie Chan Hong Kong films that have been re-released lately. The film, when Jackie isn't fighting, drags along. The comedy is the broad farcical humor that is popular in Asian films. It's a hit or miss thing. I like it more often then not but it is definitely not for everyone. The special effects aren't the greatest when the two Jackies are on screen together but still not bad considering the low budget and lack of a Hong Kong ILM branch. I like the setting. I've always enjoyed Jackie's films set in Hong Kong. I also enjoyed the supporting cast. Maggie Cheung is cute and spunky as usual.
The reason I rated this film with a four, and not a three, is because of the final fight scene. Most of the film is lacking in action, which is what makes the usual slow points in his other films easier to take. Here there are really two considerably brief action sequences early in the film and the grand finale. The fight in the auto factory is as good an action sequence as I've ever seen in a movie. Jackie shoots through the windows of cars like most people walk through a door. The stunt where Jackie pulls himself up and over a wall before a car smashes into it has to be seen to be appreciated.
I would recommend buying this film only if you're a fan of Kung-Fu or Asian films but I would also suggest renting it to anyone.
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