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Twist of the Wrist: The Motorcycle Roadracers Handbook Paperback


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Frequently Bought Together

Twist of the Wrist: The Motorcycle Roadracers Handbook + A Twist of the Wrist Vol. 2: The Basics of High-Performance Motorcycle Riding + A Twist of the Wrist II
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 117 pages
  • Publisher: California Superbike School; Revised edition (May 12, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965045013
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965045018
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 8.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #35,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Can you improve yer motorcycle riding skills by reading a book? No doubt about it. Keith Code is founder and director of California Superbike Cornering Schools and has published a number of books on the subject of racing motorcycles on speed tracks. Although most of this book's focus is on handling race bikes, only the last two of its sixteen chapters are exclusively dedicated to racing. The book concentrates mostly on better controlling your speed while maneuvering your bike over varying racetrack conditions. As you'd expect, there is a major emphasis on turning: getting through the turn with increased mph and decreased time spent in [the turn] and [maintaining] adequate control of the bike. Code's overall approach to improving riding skills is to define the basics, and then to investigate the decisions you must make to ride well. He uses a great analogy: Each person has a fixed amount of attention while riding a motorcycle. This is represented as a $10 bill worth of attention. If you spend five dollars of it on one aspect of riding, you have only five dollars left for all the other aspects. Spend nine and you have only one dollar left, and so on. The aspects of riding he talks about are things like: Road characteristics: Constant-, increasing-, and. decreasing-radius turns, crested turns, series turns, positive- and negative-camber turns, and road surfaces. What you do: Riding is one thing; riding plus being aware of what you are doing is quite another. Making an effort to look at what you are doing while you are doing it. Your own evaluation of what you just did and what just happened: Things that can be thought over and changed if necessary. I like his teaching strategy. After isolating several specific principles, concepts, and techniques, each subsequent chapter effectively builds on what was previously presented to the point that if you didn't understand the concept and haven't yet experienced it, you'll want to get back on the road and try it out, read the book some more, then evaluate what you understand. The books's worth buying. --Gary Hayes

Keith Code teaches you to read the road. He explains camber, radius, series of turns, elevation (uphill, downhill, crested track) and straight sections. Observe your products (measureable events) such as speed, lean angle, gear and RPM. Understand you controls: brakes, throttle, handle bar movement and where your body exerts force on the motorcycle. His explanation of Reference Points is invaluable, even if you are a car enthusiast. At speed, location is a moment in time. You have to use the correct control and the correct place. He explains counter steering (push right to go right) in straight forward and easy to understand detail. For the adventurous he explains sliding, hanging off and (you may need this) falling off. My riding improved considerable after reading this book. --rodieroger@earthlink.net

It seems like some reviewers have missed the point. It's the simple, fundamental things that a lot of seasoned riders get wrong. I know-I was one. Take the information and think about what you are reading. Analyse your own riding- see how much better you can do. I had been riding for 20 years when I came to this book. It made me a better rider for the price of 3 tanks of gas. It's that simple. --JohnnyGQ

Keith Code teaches you to read the road. He explains camber, radius, series of turns, elevation (uphill, downhill, crested track) and straight sections. Observe your products (measureable events) such as speed, lean angle, gear and RPM. Understand you controls: brakes, throttle, handle bar movement and where your body exerts force on the motorcycle. His explanation of Reference Points is invaluable, even if you are a car enthusiast. At speed, location is a moment in time. You have to use the correct control and the correct place. He explains counter --JohnnyGQ

Keith Code teaches you to read the road. He explains camber, radius, series of turns, elevation (uphill, downhill, crested track) and straight sections. Observe your products (measureable events) such as speed, lean angle, gear and RPM. Understand you controls: brakes, throttle, handle bar movement and where your body exerts force on the motorcycle. His explanation of Reference Points is invaluable, even if you are a car enthusiast. At speed, location is a moment in time. You have to use the correct control and the correct place. He explains counter steering (push right to go right) in straight forward and easy to understand detail. For the adventurous he explains sliding, hanging off and (you may need this) falling off. My riding improved considerable after reading this book. --rodieroger@earthlink.net

It seems like some reviewers have missed the point. It's the simple, fundamental things that a lot of seasoned riders get wrong. I know-I was one. Take the information and think about what you are reading. Analyse your own riding- see how much better you can do. I had been riding for 20 years when I came to this book. It made me a better rider for the price of 3 tanks of gas. It's that simple. --JohnnyGQ

About the Author

Keith Code Keith started riding in the dark ages of motorcycling, the 1950's. He first raced in the 60's at age 16, again in the 70's, 80's and 90's. He went to design school; was a photographer; designed and manufactured shoes for the stars; sold pretzels on the street; was a full on drug addict in the 60's; cleaned up with Dianetics; became a writer, inventor and dedicated himself to understanding and teaching the art of riding motorcycles. He was the first person to put words to roadracing and riding, and his research continues today. Keith lives in Glendale, California with his soul mate of 40 years, Judy. He has one son, Dylan.

Customer Reviews

I don't go to the track but I ride street and this book gives good advice on both.
D. E. Latson
I recommend this book along with Twist of the Wrist II (book and DVD) and the Soft Science to Road Racing Motorcycles.
C.N,
You can't help but think about your own riding and how to be a better rider when you read it.
Rick Maratea

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Gary Hayes on December 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
Can you improve yer motorcycle riding skills by reading a book? No doubt about it.
Keith Code is founder and director of California Superbike Cornering Schools and has published a number of books on the subject of racing motorcycles on speed tracks. Although most of this book's focus is on handling race bikes, only the last two of its sixteen chapters are exclusively dedicated to racing.
The book concentrates mostly on better controlling your speed while maneuvering your bike over varying racetrack conditions.
As you'd expect, there is a major emphasis on turning: getting through the turn with increased mph and decreased time spent in [the turn] and [maintaining] adequate control of the bike.
Code's overall approach to improving riding skills is to define the basics, and then to investigate the decisions you must make to ride well.
He uses a great analogy: Each person has a fixed amount of attention while riding a motorcycle. This is represented as a $10 bill worth of attention. If you spend five dollars of it on one aspect of riding, you have only five dollars left for all the other aspects. Spend nine and you have only one dollar left, and so on.
The aspects of riding he talks about are things like:
Road characteristics: Constant-, increasing-, and. decreasing-radius turns, crested turns, series turns, positive- and negative-camber turns, and road surfaces.
What you do: Riding is one thing; riding plus being aware of what you are doing is quite another. Making an effort to look at what you are doing while you are doing it.
Your own evaluation of what you just did and what just happened: Things that can be thought over and changed if necessary.
I like his teaching strategy.
Read more ›
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Phil Kelsey on July 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
This race-oriented book focuses on providing a methodology to analyse any racetrack allowing you to select and ride the lines that best suit you and your bike. Very little here for streetriders ... Flick of the Wrist II has much more on actual riding technique. If you're new to racing, buy it. If you don't plan on racing, don't buy it unless you're curious about racing strategies.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By roadieroger@earthlink.net on January 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Keith Code teaches you to read the road. He explains camber, radius, series of turns, elevation (uphill, downhill, crested track) and straight sections. Observe your products (measureable events) such as speed, lean angle, gear and RPM. Understand you controls: brakes, throttle, handle bar movement and where your body exerts force on the motorcycle. His explanation of Reference Points is invaluable, even if you are a car enthusiast. At speed, location is a moment in time. You have to use the correct control and the correct place. He explains counter steering (push right to go right) in straight forward and easy to understand detail. For the adventurous he explains sliding, hanging off and (you may need this) falling off. My riding improved considerable after reading this book.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
The book does a decent job of introducing the starting racetrack pilot to the basic concepts of corner types, throttle application, etc. Despite the fact that these topics are addressed, I felt there was a bit too much offbeat "Dianetics" style mentality references, and not enough specific "nuts and bolts" instruction on HOW to do the actual act of riding the motorcycle. Having read the Vol.I and II, I think a new racer would be best off saving their money on this book, and getting only the Vol. II version. This book is targeted primarily at the racetrack environment, and I've found that the book "Sportbiking: The Real World: The Advanced Riders Handbook", is better suited for true street going sportbikers.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By JohnnyGQ on March 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
It seems like some reviewers have missed the point. It's the simple, fundamental things that a lot of seasoned riders get wrong. I know-I was one. Take the information and think about what you are reading. Analyse your own riding- see how much better you can do. I had been riding for 20 years when I came to this book. It made me a better rider for the price of 3 tanks of gas. It's that simple.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bill Bradford on December 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book puts many techniques familiar to experienced riders in a technical context such that it becomes easier to improve your riding and analyse and change bad habits. New riders will gain an enormity from reading it too. It is highly recommended to take the knowledge learned from these pages to a track and apply the techniques in a safe yet challenging environment.
If you have the patience to stay with Mr. Code's oblique approach to the subject you will learn not only a treasure trove of techniques but also the fundamental tools of analysis to be able to continue improving on your own.
Get this book (or Twist II) and revisit it again and again, you will probably never need another text on riding.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ulrich on November 25, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Keith Code has a unique approach to instruction, which is reflected in this book (and also its sequel, A Twist of the Wrist 2).

Rather than providing a recipe for motorcycling success, Keith presents his experiences and provides them as food for the reader's thought. He frequently asks the reader to answer questions regarding the most recently covered topic and its applicability to the reader's riding.

This style can be a little frustrating if you're looking for a highly technical treatise on high-performance motorcycle riding, but it does make the material considerably more accessible.

The book itself covers many nuances of motorcycle riding (particularly on the race track, but with applicability to the street as well), ranging from topics such as cornering to braking to vision and body position.

I view this book as providing a nifty bag of tricks for riders who want to up their performance on the track or on the street.

If you're going to buy just one of Keith Code's books, I'd recommend buying the sequel (A Twist of the Wrist 2) because it covers some of the same ground and is updated to more modern riding styles.
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