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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good game, couple of flaws
I'm a gamer. This is a well made game. It's a bit linear as you have to do certain story parts to open up new areas. It does have replayability however, as you will pick one path and then try another path the second, third time. It's great to be a caster and attack a horde of orcs or a dragon with 8 conjured minions. I have primarily played a mage in this game up to a...
Published on December 25, 2010 by Rinimand

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92 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good choice for gamers with a bit of patience
(I have not tried any of the online play, so this review is essentially for the base game with the included patches that are otherwise downloadable.)

I am a HUGE fan of single-player PC action/adventure RPGs, especially the Elder Scrolls and Gothic titles. Although I have yet to dig into Oblivion's Shivering Isles expansion, I have since tried to find a few...
Published on October 21, 2008 by R. McAtee


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92 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good choice for gamers with a bit of patience, October 21, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
(I have not tried any of the online play, so this review is essentially for the base game with the included patches that are otherwise downloadable.)

I am a HUGE fan of single-player PC action/adventure RPGs, especially the Elder Scrolls and Gothic titles. Although I have yet to dig into Oblivion's Shivering Isles expansion, I have since tried to find a few "bargain bin" games to play in between Lord of the Rings Online sessions. The Witcher was fantastic, Fable too short and too buggy. I stumbled upon Two Worlds by accident, but I'm glad I did. As another game coming out of Europe, it isn't exactly a household name, and it's certainly not the most original game you'll ever play, but it is quite entertaining . . . if you can tolerate some of its shortcomings.

For starters, Two Worlds might not be quite what you'd expect from the box description or installation process, which is sometimes funny and sometimes frustrating. During the installation, there is a splash screen with a busty young woman. If you've played The Witcher or Fable, you might think that to be a hint of in-game "conquests" to look forward to, but it's your SISTER. It's also (after 50 hours of gameplay, anyway) the most revealing display you'll ever see. More on that later. There is a reference to four character classes, but unlike traditional RPGs where you pick a class and stick with it, Two Worlds doesn't adhere to strict character design limitations. For that matter, don't expect much guidance as to what path you take; after a lot of time spent playing, I have yet to find any advantage to straying far from the hack-and-slash route. Magic certainly has its place, and you can of course follow a more archery-heavy ranger approach, but sooner or later you're going to find yourself in the thick of a dungeon brawl where a sword and heavy armor are your best resources. Fans of a rogue/thief/assassin approach will probably be disappointed, as stealth and backstabbing are not viable for getting through most encounters.

Much has been said about the use of horses for travel and combat in Two Worlds, mostly negative. While a horse understandably can't scale a sheer cliff or jump over a castle wall, there are situations where your horse will abruptly stop in its tracks or change direction rather than continue where the path slopes a bit or a small obstacle blocks it. This is also true in combat, as your steed will charge headlong through a squad of orcs without hesitation, and then slam on the breaks as you ride past a single opponent. You might have the best armor in the game, but a couple of orc arrows or swipes from a dragon will kill your horse quickly. I also found myself being pursued by guards after my horse apparently trampled innocent bystanders. This wouldn't be so frustrating if the horse wasn't so bloody useful. Pathing issues aside, a horse will greatly reduce travel time, and the damage bonus available when fighting from the saddle can be quite significant. Carving your way through a pack of wolves or slaughtering a band of outlaws is very satisfying - if you don't get hung up halfway through. Different types of horses (including orc lizard-mounts and armored skeletal horses) have varying cargo capacity, and are pretty much a must-have for any dungeon adventurer.

Other interesting features are alchemy and equipment enhancement. Alchemical ingredients can be found all through the land, generally fare less scarce than in Gothic. Gems can be found to upgrade weapon damage, and armor and weapons of the same type can (usually) be "stacked" numerous times to increase stats. Unfortunately, some of the gems used in alchemy have misleading stats, because they don't mix to create potions or enhancements, but rather traps and bombs that may not be of particular use to you. Even with your strength boosted by potions and level-ups, carrying capacity is limited, so it's often best to find a safe storage place (abandoned buildings are great for this) and place a portable teleport stone there for easy access. It won't take long for you to accumulate some serious wealth, but some items are best held onto for future upgrades.

In terms of story, look and feel, Two Worlds could just as well have the Gothic logo on the front. Seriously, someone unfamiliar with either game could read the plot synopsis from the first Gothic game and play Two Worlds all the way through without realizing they are different games. Orcs are poised to invade human lands, while rival human factions do battle in forests, mountains and villages. The orcs' god is imprisoned, necromancers are up to their usual business, and now an anonymous newcomer has arrived on the scene to do everyone else's dirty work while pursuing some noble plot. There are wolves, lizards, dragons and various other critters cluttering up the Euro-styled landscape, which is liberally stocked with healing shrines, magical monuments and teleport rings. All the standards are here.

Unoriginality aside, Two Worlds is fun. There are many, many quests in the villages and cities, and even in the wilderness, all in addition to the main storyline. I found myself engaging mostly in side quests, coming back to the main plot when it looked as though a particular mission might drastically affect faction standing or travel options. Although far more of the game world is dedicated to wilderness and wildlife than to villages, cities and dungeons, there are roads and trails crossing the landscape, with ruins, bandit camps and houses here and there. Even with a very modest hardware configuration and scaled-back visual settings, you can see for incredible distances, often being able to see a route from your current location to a fortress or city that appears to be miles away on the map. Caves, tombs and graveyards are often tucked away off the beaten path, so exploration is key if you want to see your stats and equipment improve without spending your hard-earned coin at the town vendors. The various dungeons are loaded with monsters who carry all sorts of loot, and treasure chests often contain some of the best spoils. This does require some skill with the lockpicks, which can be hard to come by early on.

There are few blatant bugs, although nothing as severe as was found in Gothic 3. Stability has been quite good - I've only had one crash in over 50 hours of play. The main problem is that corners were cut here and there. The dialog is atrocious, and the characters' mouths don't even move in a lot of the cut scenes. The character models look quite good in third-person mode, but not so good close-up during the cut scenes. Remember when I mentioned the woman during the initial installation? This far into the game, she's the only female who isn't wrapped up head-to-toe in some overzealous attempt at modesty. This isn't a game that needs to rely on T&A to make it interesting, but in a world where male characters are encased in staggering suits of armor, the females are extremely uninspired. What's worse is that almost none of the female denizens will talk to you, which is something right out of the original Gothic. Your sister? She communicates you mostly as a ghostly greyish apparition via cut scenes. I wasn't expecting The Witcher's level of <ahem> interaction, but every woman in every town need not threaten to call the guards when I approach. Because of the way the inventory screen is arranged - poorly, as is typical of the genre - dealing with vendors can be a huge hassle. The save-game menu isn't very intuitive either, when it comes to overwriting or deleting old saves. Definitely don't skimp on the saves, as the autosave function works on a timer rather than when you enter new areas.

If you're still reading this, you are probably very patient, which is a good thing if you're going to get the most out of Two Worlds. It really is a good game if you don't mind the generic world and plot, but it takes some time to get used to the quirks and move past them to the good stuff. I like games where I can wander freely, and still get many hours out of the quests. This is definitely more open-ended than The Witcher or Fable, more on the scale of Gothic or Elder Scrolls, and there is more room for replaying due to the reputation system and its bearing on faction and quests. Basically, buy this if you have the time to dedicate to a huge game and are willing to work around the problems.
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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good game, couple of flaws, December 25, 2010
This review is from: Two Worlds Epic Edition [Download] (Software Download)
I'm a gamer. This is a well made game. It's a bit linear as you have to do certain story parts to open up new areas. It does have replayability however, as you will pick one path and then try another path the second, third time. It's great to be a caster and attack a horde of orcs or a dragon with 8 conjured minions. I have primarily played a mage in this game up to a pretty high level. I did fighter for quite some time as well, but it gets repetitive and is actually tougher than the mage. Thief is useless. The game doesn't force you into one of these archetypes, you are free to mix / match skills, but a hybrid in this game is weaker than a pure character. The game is good enough that I bother to write a review so that others will try this game. At $5 it's a steal. Skip the $5 cappuccino and buy this game instead.
Flaws: I ding this 1/2 star start for the magic card system, and 1/2 star for the flawed sneaking/thief system.
1) Magic card system is weak. During combat, a caster is opening the magic window every few seconds to swap spell cards or enhancement cards. That said, the magic in this game is well thought out and looks great. I love firewalls!
2) Item collection becomes tedious and at higher levels you just give up on it. Early in the game you almost obsess over it. Later, you ignore all but the most intriguing items.
3) AI is weak. Mostly get bushwacked and charged. But, combat is interesting and looks great.
4) Sneaking is useless. Take it from someone who primarily plays thief/rogues in games like PnP D&D, D&D Online, Everquest, Neverwinter Nights, Oblivion, Morrowind, Daggerfall, you name it. I gave up on thief here after 1 hour.
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flawed Gem, September 15, 2008
By 
N. Diamon (Lakewood, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Let me clear the air right off. I do not own this edition of the game. I own the first PC edition. The only difference between the two is the addition of a few more multiplayer maps and options and the improvements in the 1.7 patch which can be downloaded for free if you own the previous version. For that reason, I will not be discussing the mutiplayer beyond what I have experienced in the original.

This game got a pretty bad rap when it first came out for PC and 360 in August of '07. It was buggy, rough, and very prone to crashing. The multiplayer was an empty wasteland due to the poor connection issues and aimless gameplay.

Fast forward to a year later. Is Two Worlds any good? Well, it's not a bad game. It's a surprisingly fun (but mindless) romp through thick euro-fantasy tropes and hack & slash gameplay.

Your character wakes up after being attacked and having his sister kidnapped by ne'er-do-wells. You gird yourself in a gravelly voice and oversized armor and head out to chop your way through the countryside. That's about it for the story. It suffers from the normal complaints in the European low fantasy genre, namely that the VO work is stilted and hammy and the plotline makes little sense. But you didn't really pick this game up for the stirring script did you?

The game shines in the implementation of a completely open world similar to Oblivion with simplistic action RPG combat. As you level up in your quest to rescue your sister and defeat the overdramatic Evil Force, you'll ramble over the landscape and trounce enemies using either magic or weaponry and your upgradeable skills.

The skill system isn't quite as advanced as the one in Oblivion, but it's deeper than many other action RPGs. You'll definitely not be able to max out all the skills in a playthrough, so you'll have to allocate points wisely with each level.

The loot is widely varied and very cool. You can upgrade your weapons and armor by imbuing them with gems that add various effects. In a very innovative move, you may keep adding the same type of gem to a previously upgraded item, so you can keep improving the stats on a low level piece of kit beyond the point at which you normally would trash it. You can also "meld" the same type of item to improve the base stats if you pick up a repeat of something you already have. This is something I wish more loot heavy games would do.

It appears SouthPeak wisely took the picture of the protaganist astride the warhorse off the front of the game. Mounted travel and combat was a feature marketed in the prerelease of the game, which turned out to have all the attraction and practicality of building your own Model T Ford. Stay away from the horseback riding. You'll save yourself a lot of stress.

The bugs have been ironed out for the most part. there are still a few quest glitches and random graphical bugs, but there's nothing too upsetting at this point. I haven't crashed yet since upgrading to the latest patch.

If you play this game as a simple action RPG rather than some kind of epic roleplaying story, you'll have a blast.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Why does everyone hate this?, September 25, 2009
By 
E. Wirsing (Federal Way, WA (Hooray!)) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Let me start by saying that I am an RPG fanatic, having fallen in love with such titles as "Gothic" (all 3 titles), "The Witcher," "Baldur's Gate I & II," "Morrowind," "Drakensang," "Soulbringer," "Planescape: Torment," etc. I also am in love with mods, and love to mod the heck out whatever game I can.

That being said, I like Two Worlds. It is a fun romp through a cliched world, and the plot threads are enough for anyone to get tangled up in.

GRAPHICS
The graphics match anything "Oblivion" can throw at you, and not only that, but the stone structures in this game actually outdo "Oblivion's" buildings. And the graphics equal or outstrip "Oblivion" without the ridiculous minimum system requirements. Reflective water was a bitch to get working in "Oblivion," with several mods being downloaded to try and remedy what was default in "Morrowind." Two Worlds pulls it off without a hitch. Not only that, standing on the shores of the oceans, you can see the tides come rolling in. Everyone looks fuggly, but that's okay. Your character (for some reason) reminds me of Arnold Schwartzeneggar, facially.

SOUND
Well, the sound is pretty standard. Swoosh! Splat! etc. The voice acting ranges from okay to bad, but at least it doesn't sound as hideous as some others ("Crusaders of Might & Magic" comes to mind). I don't expect Oscar work from a video game, so I guess I'm more forgiving there. Your character's voice isn't too bad -- there are a few lines that didn't stack up but that was due to poor direction and lack of experience more than anything else.

The musical choices were interesting, at the very least. There's folk-rock vocal work in the soundtrack as well, which is a change from the usual strict symphonic scores that have been the standard since "Baldur's Gate." At least it kept things slightly interesting. The ambient music was better than some ("Drakensang," "Hard to be a God").

GAMEPLAY
Once I customized the controls to the configuration I always use I was really never lost. It plays a lot like "Morrowind," "Gothic II," or any other game of its ilk. It does suffer the RPG curse when it comes to horses. "Oblivion" and "Hard to be a God" have similar issues when it comes to controlling your horse. I have some tips: Try and move your mouse to face the direction your horse is facing. I've used a horse quite a bit in Two Worlds to great effect.

Hitting someone is just a matter of hitting the left mouse button. The RMB is left for the selected hotbar item (usually a spell of some kind). Movement uses the mouse for facing and the keyboard for actually moving. You can attack anyone in this game -- just don't expect to be able to beat many of them.

Getting bad @$$ is a combination of finding loot and improving your abilities. You constantly get experience as you whack bad guys and complete quests. When you gain a level, you gain stat points (to pour into Strength and such) and skill points (to place in Pick Locks, or Alchemy, etc). Every skill has a place, and a use. Some skills (like Alchemy, Necromancy, and Stoneskin) need to be "unlocked," by talking to the right person and doing what they want you to. The skill points can be placed wherever you like. You could be an archer, an alchemist, a warrior, a mage, a thief, or some hybrid. The only restriction is that the skills can only go so high each level.

The bad guys don't scale to your level. Even on Easy, expect everything to get medieval on your buttocks. The nice thing is, you can't die. You auto-respawn at the nearest "shrine." Shrines also regenerate your hit points, making a battle somewhat one-sided if you can lure an enemy near one and constantly regenerate while smacking your foe silly.

I haven't seen any show-stopping bugs in this yet, and I'm running this on a Vista rig.

Why does this get bad reviews? I've read what others have written, and I don't really have the problems everyone else does. It's a solid, well-conceived game. The side quests are usually more novel than "find the foozle." The world is HUGE -- and you can run all over the place. There are teleporters, for those who don't want to walk everywhere. I could use more variety for the monsters, but I suppose that's okay.

Haven't tried multiplayer, and I don't intend to. Haven't found anything to compare to LAN gaming in "Neverwinter Nights," "Dungeon Siege," or "Dungeon Lords" yet. Probably won't for a long time, either.

As for activation, yes -- it's a headache. But you can activate by phone, or email support (by now, someone, somewhere has an internet connection, go the library or a university computer lab, for heaven's sake. E-mail response was very prompt).

It's not perfect, but nothing is. It's still the same kind of fun I had running around in "Baldur's Gate" with 2-D sprites. Only now it's 3-D, and the role-playing system is a heckuva lot better than Dungeons & Dragons in any incarnation. I'm definitely looking forward to Two Worlds II: The Temptation.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Epic Edition was what the original should have been..., October 12, 2010
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Thanks to something like 30 updates. Two Worlds is now a perfectly playable game for the PC. Epic Edition takes care of most of these updates. When it was first released on the PC and 360 world. Two Worlds was a barely playable stuttering flaw riddled mess. It got hammered pretty bad by reviewers and rightfully so. The 360 version is still quite flawed, even with all its updates. Essentially this was made for the PC and ported to the 360. It was rushed and done poorly. But since it was made for the PC, the developers were virtually able to eliminate the most offensive problems with the PC game and turn this game into what it should have been on day one. The 360 to this day still fares worse because it was a problem riddled game, ported onto a system that gave it even more problems. So the best they could do with the 360 version was make it run a little smoother, try to prevent crashes from occuring as often as they did. Not to mention, control wise, this game is just meant for a keyboard and mouse.

So what is this game here, Two Worlds. Its Oblivion but with lesser graphics and gameplay. Thats still pretty good though. You get a huge open world environment. Side quests, main quests. You can teleport. Fight all sorts of beasts, thieves, warriors, golems, dragons. Action/RPG, you know the drill. The game only really supports third person, the first person gameplay doesn't allow for fighting, not much use in it really. They don't try and reinvent anything, they just try and throw as much "RPG" as they possibly can into this game. I tell ya, I love that Necromancy. Nothing like conjuring up the dead to help you. Thats my favorite part of the game, the spell casting is really fun. Unlike most RPG's, casting spells doesn't really require much learning or skill. You can still be a "Warrior" and do a wicked spell. You also get two added multiplayer dlc in the Epic Edition. Don't expect to find many people playing these though.

It's sad really, a $5 game thats basically got all the stuff you'd see in a Grand Theft Auto IV, Oblivion or Fallout 3. All the nearly limitless possibilities like those games have. Had it not been for the terrible initial release of this game, maybe it would still be a well liked game. Instead its a bad joke amongst many video game fans. Sure its great now, some 30 updates later, but the damage is done. To many people remember this as that unplayable mess.

But if your willing to look past all those horrible reviews, get a fully updated version such as the "Epic Edition" and accept the fact that this is an Oblivion clone...You may really enjoy this game and for just $5.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth it, March 10, 2009
By 
Lisa Gamuciello "Lisa G." (Lakewood, CO United States) - See all my reviews
= Fun:1.0 out of 5 stars 
March 27, 2009 I "found a way" to run this game. If I had known there was an activation code, I wouldn't have bought it. Anyway, I still don't recommend it. There are too many weird bugs like you can lose a weapon without realizing it, you're supposed to be able to stack weapons but it doesn't always work. I got to the last two fights, but I'm not strong enough. After the major quests are done, it is too hard and tedious to level up enough. I decided it's not worth it.

March 11, 2009 Turns out this game has to be activated by Internet. If you get an activation code, you can't use that code on any other computer. My gaming machine is not connected to the internet, so I can't play this game. I wish someone had let me know.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Quick note, December 18, 2012
This review is from: Two Worlds Epic Edition [Download] (Software Download)
For those wondering, this does NOT work on steam. The game is downloaded straight from Amazon and entering the CD key into steam doesn't work either. Just a heads up for those anticipating a steam title.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars SUSPICIOUS REQUEST, December 1, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Two Worlds Epic Edition [Download] (Software Download)
I'm updating my review because of some strange things going on with this game.

The game itself is okay, definitely nothing special but I'll take it over that steaming pile of cheapness called Dungeon Siege III any day of the week - even with it's atrocious voice-acting and outdated graphics.

Well anyway, I hadn't played the game in a while and decided to start it up last night, a couple of weeks after installing a new GPU and 4 more gb's of RAM. Strangely, upon starting the game I get a screen that says the game has detected new hardware and that I must now register it to play beyond the demo (which would not work either).

To register the game they require practically every bit of your personal information, including name, address, phone number and d.o.b. Ironically, they make no request for your original activation code. Uh-huh....

Like a dummy I initially attempted to give them this information but it wouldn't send. The send button just did not work, however, you can do it over the phone if you want to make (and pay for) an international phone call most likely to Germany. I'm glad it didn't work because I wasn't thinking how suspicious the request was at first. I just wanted to see how much better the game looked with the new hardware.

I can't imagine why they would all of a sudden make this request for a game I've previously paid for and activated simply because of a better GPU and a bit more RAM but they did and they refuse to let me play my game until I give them the information. It ain't gonna happen. There is no logical reason for it and I don't trust the motives of the nameless, faceless people from across the ocean that expect me to fall for it.

The game has been uninstalled and any trace I could find of it deleted. It'd be pretty hard to imagine that the game publisher is up to no good with this but nothing would surprise me these days. The fact of the matter is that none of us should have to do this kind of crap after we've already paid for and previously activated a game nor should we tolerate it when we encounter it. The game is in the trash bin as far as I'm concerned.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A quick review of how awesome this game is, October 24, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Okay, I received this game fews hours ago and let me just start off by saying this. THIS GAME IS AWESOME!

Graphics are 4/5 (Depends on your PC the graphics could look even better)
Soundtracks 3.5/5 (They're good but I've heard better soundtracks from other RPG's)
Storyline 4.5/5 (It reminded me of the original Fable game for the original XBOX)
Gameplay 4/5 (Its not hard to learn how to play it but when you do its really fun)
Replay Value - Moderetly high

So far this game sounds good right? You bet it does! This game has huge enviroments such as THE ELDER SCROLLS series, awesome gameplay, and its pretty much a really great game for any RPG fan. I highly recommend this game. If you're unsure about buying it, trailers and gameplay footages are available on youtube for anyone to check out before buying (just like I did).

P.S. REMEMBER THIS! YOU NEED TO HAVE AN INTERNET CONNECTION TO ACTIVATE THIS GAME!
What do I mean by that? You will only be allowed to play the demo unless you activate the full game version using the internet connection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An awesome addiction, August 4, 2009
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
With a single player game on the computer, and a free multiplayer universe, its a great game for any hard RPGer, who enjoys spending hours in front of the screen. You are a bounty hunter in search of his sisters kidnappers, that are found through a series of quests and slaughtering. You don't have to follow the quests that are in line with the main story plot, the entire world can be explored without even starting it. Levels can be gained, potions made and weapons stacked, by simply running around and killing everything. With five different majic schools, and many different trainable skills, random bamdits and caves with giant spiders and hundreds of skelletons, this blows Oblivion out of the water.
The online feature has different quests, and the option to play a game with your friends, and only them. Nobody taking your quests or killing the bad guy, and having to wait for him to respawn. No waiting for others to get out of the way, unless you choose to have them there.
This is one of my top games, one i have to keep on eye on, or i get too addicted. Its always nice to have a game you want to go back to, like a book you can't put down.

Have Fun!!
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