Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $1.69 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The cover has some scuffs and wear around the edges. The cover has curled corners. This book is clean and tight inside! Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Mailer - Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Type 4 Diabetes: Elevated Insulin. Lower Blood Sugar. 24/7 Pain. Paperback – December 15, 2006


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, December 15, 2006
"Please retry"
$15.26
$14.64 $11.24
Best%20Books%20of%202014

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: BBGmedia; 1 edition (December 15, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061513761X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615137612
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,512,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By James K. Smith on January 30, 2007
Type 4 Diabetes: Elevated Insulin. Lower Blood Sugar. 24/7 Pain. is based on a seven-year journey by the author, Bob Ranson, from cardiac arrest in 1999 to a life of constant pain and complications, a pacemaker and dozens of only partially-effective medications. Now, the author is living pain and drug free through the discovery of the link between the nerve disorder and glucose levels.

More than a personal journal, Type 4 Diabetes combines the author's experiences and discoveries with ground-breaking research being conducted by experts in Alzheimer's, fibromyalgia and other chronic disorders. The title, Type 4 Diabetes, in fact reflects and pays respect to the work being conducted at Brown Medical School on halting the progressive degeneration of Alzheimer's Disease by treating it with a new class of diabetes medications. In 2006, the Brown team proposed that Alzheimer's be relabeled as Type 3 Diabetes.

Suffering from both autonomic neuropathy and diabetes, the author literally stumbled across his findings as he recorded the pain and effectiveness of the medications to treat the nervous disorder while he monitored daily glucose levels in another diary. The growing realization that he was dealing with at least related diseases led him to decision to use himself as a "lab rat" and test out theories and potential treatment approaches.

In his book, the author describes this process in a concise style and integrates his findings with the writings of medical experts about faulty glucose metabolism -- the cause of diabetes. The author subsequently points to an abnormal interaction between two key hormones, adrenaline and insulin, as being the foundation for the suffering experienced by people with neuropathy, fibromyalgia and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ira M. Edwards on August 9, 2007
Verified Purchase
TYPE 4 DIABETES is a great book. I won't bother telling what interesting reading it is; my concern is what follows this book. Bob Ranson and his doctors stopped short of the next step: that is, where does blood glucose act?
Glucose is the energy source of the cell. Though glucose is routinely measured in the blood, it is what is in the cell that matters most. When insulin resistance causes blood sugar to rise, the cell is deprived. We might call that HYPOGLYCELLIA.
Questions arise: When blood insulin rises, is that an indication that cells are being deprived of glucose? Might insulin level be a vital test? (Cardiologist Al Sears thinks so.) Can glucose-starved cells cause neurological, kidney and eye damage years before blood glucose rises and diabetes is a concern? Might a little sugar at the right time provide cells with what they need, bringing relief from pain and fatigue in various conditions? I don't find these questions answered in the literature, but this book makes them a vital concern.
Thank you, Bob Ranson, for raising questions that may change the face of medical science.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Karen Cleveland on January 30, 2007
In the search to find answers to health issues most americans accept the diagonosis and treatments prescribed by their doctors. It was refreshing to read the author's journey and findings as he challenged his doctors and accepted practices. This is a must read for anyone dealing with daily pain and/or blood sugar and insulin issues as well as doctors and researchers. My hope is this books leads to more research to help those suffering every day.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By D. Haversack on September 23, 2008
Verified Purchase
It is more of a journey of the authors illness. He symptoms seemed extreme so it was hard to relate to myself. It seemed to be more relevant to diabetes rather than hypoglycemia.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again