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U.S. Grant and the American Military Tradition. Paperback – June, 1954

ISBN-13: 978-0673393272 ISBN-10: 0673393275

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 201 pages
  • Publisher: Little Brown & Co (T) (June 1954)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0673393275
  • ISBN-13: 978-0673393272
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #858,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Candace Scott on July 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Bruce Catton was the man who salvaged Ulysses Grant's flagging reputation in the 1950's and 60's, and restored him to his deserved place in the pantheon of America's greats. Catton wrote a marvelous trilogy of Grant's military career and also wrote this little gem which is, by a wide margin, the best introductory work ever written on Grant. This isn't intended for people who are civil war historians or who have a vast knowledge of Grant. It's meant for those who know little about Grant and are curious to learn more. Look no further than the pages of this book.
Catton understands Grant nearly to perfection, and this is a hard task given his subject's inscrutible nature. He admires him tremendously and the reader will undoubtedly share his feelings by the end of the book. Grant was an immensely likeable, honest and decent man; he loved his wife, his children and his country and sacrficied immensely for them all. One weakness here is that Catton gives very short shrift to Grant's Presidency; he seems to run out of gas a trifle after Appomattox.
If you are new to Grant and want to learn more, this is *the* book to purchase. You won't be sorry.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Candace Scott on March 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
Bruce Catton was the man who salvaged Ulysses Grant's flagging reputation in the 1950's and 60's, and restored him to his deserved place in the pantheon of America's greats. Catton wrote a marvelous trilogy of Grant's military career and also wrote this little gem which is, by a wide margin, the best introductory work ever written on Grant. This isn't intended for people who are civil war historians or who have a vast knowledge of Grant. It's meant for those who know little about Grant and are curious to learn more. Look no further than the pages of this book.
Catton understands Grant nearly to perfection, and this is a hard task given his subject's inscrutible nature. He admires him tremendously and the reader will undoubtedly share his feelings by the end of the book. Grant was an immensely likeable, honest and decent man; he loved his wife, his children and his country and sacrficied immensely for them all. One weakness here is that Catton gives very short shrift to Grant's Presidency; he seems to run out of gas a trifle after Appomattox.
If you are new to Grant and want to learn more, this is *the* book to purchase. You won't be sorry.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Armand D Sanchez on September 24, 1998
Format: Library Binding
This book was a marvelous read. The author kept my interest throughout the first two-thirds of the book. However, he does deal blandly with Grant's political career. Overall though, quite touching and well done.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robert H. Boyer on March 26, 2011
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Bruce Catton writes in a clear straight forward manner and he lets history dictate his text. Unlike Southern Historians who made Robert E. Lee out to be a
Great General far Superior to US Grant or most other Generals in History. He was in fact a rather mediocre general who could not learn not to make frontal assaults against rifled muskets from Malvern Hill to Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. Of course, Grant was more interested in winning the war then personal aggrandizement and since the Northern Historians chose to let their Southern Counterparts write the History of the war Lee got a tremendous coverage from people Like Douglas Southal Freeman. Southern Historians talked about the lost cause as if it were something sacred when as a matter of fact the lost cause which was the defense of slavery was doomed to be lost sooner or later. All going to war against a superior battlefield captain like US Grant accomplished was to made it sooner and bloodier. I liked the book and Catton's writing because at long last we had a guy who was not afraid to sing the praises of a General who could rank with any Pantheon of Great Generals!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mary Bolen on July 11, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very satisfied
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