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UNIX in a Nutshell: System V Edition: A Desktop Quick Reference for System V Release 4 and Solaris 2.0 (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)) Paperback – June 8, 1992

ISBN-13: 978-1565920019 ISBN-10: 1565920015 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)
  • Paperback: 444 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (June 8, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565920015
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565920019
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,701,826 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Simply the best System V and Solaris reference on the market today, Unix in a Nutshell won't steer you wrong. The book's concise style delivers the essential information on Unix, shell, and utility commands. Its command documentation is clear and complete and its examples are relevant and easy to follow.

Gilly starts with a complete, alphabetized listing of core Unix commands. Each entry includes a syntax summary, a clear statement of what the command does, and a full list of options, each with commentary on its function. The author then covers shell documentation, supplying details on the Bourne, Korn, and C shells and documenting each shell's commands in the standard format. Gilly also includes a section on regular expressions as they apply to grep, egrep, text editors, and various scripting languages.

Next, the book offers complete documentation of Emacs, ex, and vi, the powerful editors whose command structure proves perennially difficult to learn. The commands, once again, appear alphabetically with statements of their respective purposes. Other popular utilities--sed, awk, nroff, troff, tbl, and several macro languages--follow. Code managers SCCS and RCS, rarely documented in Unix books, bring up the rear.

Users need to know what they're looking up or they won't find this book useful. Otherwise, Unix in a Nutshell's documentation is the best. --David Wall

From the Publisher

You may have seen UNIX quick-reference guides, but you've never seen anything like UNIX in a Nutshell. Not a scaled-down quick reference of common commands, UNIX in a Nutshell is a complete reference containing all commands and options, along with generous descriptions and examples that put the commands in context. For all but the thorniest UNIX problems, this one reference should be all the documentation you need. The second edition of UNIX in a Nutshell starts with thorough coverage of System V Release 3. To that, we've added the many new commands that were added to Release 4 and additional commands that were added to Solaris 2.0. Contents include: All user and programmer commands. New Korn shell documentation. Expanded text editing section, including GNU Emacs and nawk. Shell syntax (sh and csh). Pattern-matching syntax. vi and ex commands. sed and awk commands. troff and related commands and macros. sdb and dbx commands. make, RCS, and SCCS commands. If you currently use either SVR3 or SVR4 or are planning to in the future, or if you're a Sun user facing the transition to Solaris, you'll want this book. UNIX in a Nutshell is the most comprehensive quickref on the market, a must for any UNIX user.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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This book in easily carried in an brief case for quick deployment.
Alexander E. Paulsen
The information presented in this book is very clear, well arranged, and very detailed.
Lem Bryant (lem@lem.net)
If you administer or work with a UNIX system, YOU MUST HAVE THIS BOOK!
David Douthitt (ddouthitt@usa.net)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
The only reason that this book didn't get 5 stars is that it isn't what I'd consider a "bible". Its not recent, so many of the commands listed in there have additional switches or are now obsolete. But what is in there is great. I use it everytime I'm writing a shell script. It lacks extensive samples, so it isn't great for a beginner unless it is supplemented by a more in depth book. I use the reference section on awk and vi daily.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you're a beginner or even casual user of Unix then steer clear of this book. While the information contained within is excellent, it's more suited towards experienced users as it's not very well explained.
Also a major fault is the incredibly poor index. Frankly, it's one of the worst I've ever seen in any computer book. Pathetic. Instead of just indexing the terms, the descriptives should be listed as well.
But all is not lost. When you become used to Unix (although I cringe at the title, Unix For Dummies 3rd Edition is a very good starting point), Unix In A Nutshell is a thorough reference. Just don't plan on using the index!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is great as a referance. Don't buy this is your looking for a step by step book. This book has ALOT of commands and shows you all the options associated with that command. It also has a few shells and certain shortcuts you can exacute within that shell. Overall its great as a referance. If you want to find out what a command does, just flip through the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Travis M. Owens on June 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you want to be able to read the man pages away frm your computer, this book is for you. Basically its general unix MAN pages put on page, without all the length bs thats in the computerized version. All the attributes are listed and explained clearly (more clearly than most of the man pages, which I sometimes find to be poorly written or by people too nerdy for their own good). But thats only 1/3 of the book. The other 2/3 is details about each shell, C shell, Korn shell, Bourne shell. It then goes on to discuss things like pattern matching, emacs, troffm sedm awk, make, sccs. And considering this book costs a mere $10 retail its a steal. Especially when computer monitors are not easy on the eyes to read. This is a reference book EVERY unix sys admin needs.
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Format: Paperback
As the preface says this is not a tutorial for the beginner, but if you are in the target audience this book is a must have. It is also a handy reference for the beginner. Everyone will find "Unix in a Nutshell" an excellent value.
The information presented in this book is very clear, well arranged, and very detailed. If you are stuck and need a little brain jog, pick up "Unix in a Nutshell" and get instant satisfaction.
Not only does this book cover the basic commands of Unix it also covers, the EMACS and VI editors, Bourne, Korn, and C Shells, and Debugger.
If you are a Unix user or programmer and this book is not on your shelf I have to assume that you are using it. If you take your Unix seriously this book is for you.
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Format: Paperback
Three years ago I was baptized into UNIX by working on an AIX system. Lost in the system's cryptic commands, I found picked up 3 books. Two were introduction books the last was UNIX IN A NUTSHELL. Of the three, UNIX IN A NUTSHELL is the only one I still have. When required to go to a client's site, I double check my bulging briefcase to make sure the book is tucked away. It is my security blanket. The book is divided into sections of common commands, from standard UNIX to vi, to make. While it doesn't give detailed explanations or examples, it does provide succinct definitions. This is a book for power users.
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By Sanu Padhi on December 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
Most of my development time is spent on Windows. But deployment almost always has been on UNIX. That's when I need to use vi sometimes, make changes to some "make" files, do some basic navigation and file manipulation. The Nutshell book fulfills my needs in that aspect. For advanced shell scripting or awk programming, you need to look elsewhere. But then that is not the purpose of the book anyway.
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By A Customer on February 4, 1997
Format: Paperback
UNIX in a Nutshell is the only book that I ALWAYS take along on consulting assignments. It is the single best reference book I've ever found for things UNIX.

Not one of my clients is running either System V OR Solaris -- but it really doesn't seem to matter. Sure, I occasionally have to go the man pages for details -- but only after first finding out most of what I need.

Highly recommended
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