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  • USB 2.0 DirectLink PC to PC Data Transfer Cable
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USB 2.0 DirectLink PC to PC Data Transfer Cable

by Generic

List Price: $39.99
Price: $19.99 + $4.87 shipping
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Ships from and sold by SerialStuff.
  • This USB 2.0 to USB 2.0 direct link cable allows you to share files and transfer data conveniently!
  • The cable is approximately 6 feet long and has over current protection!
  • The cable plugs into a USB port on each PC and is automatically detected by each computer as a removable drive.


Product Details

  • Item Weight: 6.1 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 6.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B000BL6IZO
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: May 10, 2004

Product Description

Instantlytransfer files - No Drivers Needed!Product InformationInstantly share files and transfer data conveniently! This USB 2.0 DirectLink Cable connects to your computers USB port to another computers USB port so you can conveniently transfer files and data at super fast USB 2.0 speeds! This DirectLink cable uses a special design to eliminate drivers completely.  The manufacturers did this by cleverly adding a flash chip right inside the cable.  This chip is "seen" as a separate drive by the PC and on this chip is the program used by the cable.  Simply run the program on each machine and it's ready for use!  This compact device is ideal for home or office use or for taking work on the road.  Order yours today!Product Features Direct cable link of two PCs via the USB port Plug and Play with hot plug Over current protection USB 2.0 transfer rates up to 480 Mbps (backwards compatible with USB 1.1 rates of up to 12 Mbps) Share files and transfer data conveniently Bus powered - no external power source needed Standard Windows Explorer user interface Driverless design (executable program installed on a flash chip built into the cable) Approximately 6 feet from plug to plugIncludes USB 2.0 Driverless DirectLink Cable CD with manual and Windows 98 driver Windows Requirements Windows 98SE Me 2000 XP Available USB port CD-ROM DriveNotes: Package used is generic for four different products. Please ignore any "NetLink" functions listed on the packaging

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Caveat emptor - I had to trash it - here ordering the Diamond one.
Xgenei
The software is included in the blue module in the middle of the cable and requires no install for XP(win 98 requires an install).
BTX
Any suggestions out there for a program that transfers file and program and it is easy?????????????
greekgoddess

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By BTX on January 2, 2009
The software is included in the blue module in the middle of the cable and requires no install for XP(win 98 requires an install). It was very easy to use! I didn't discover until a week later that it had reset the creation and modification dates for ALL files. This was a problem for me so I had to go back and copy to an external hard drive and move the files to retain those settings and then try to merge the files that were changed after that the first copy. BIG PAIN! I'm sure I will still find some uses for the cable when the dates aren't important to me.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr Lapin on January 8, 2009
This gadget reminds me of Laplink, a program I used probably 20 years ago with MSDOS. If you plugged a cable into the parallel ports of each computer and then ran the program on both, you could transfer files back and forth.

That program sure beat the old "sneakernet" approach of swapping 360kb floppies, and I'd have to say the same for this device. In fact the cable has about the same functionality as Laplink did. Although it's faster, the average file today is much bigger, so that's mostly a wash.

You can get much better speed and flexibility with with Windows peer to peer networking, using a crossover Ethernet cable or a couple of wifi cards. However, that usually requires a bit of setup effort. This system is plug and play with no setup required (as long as you're running Windows).

The nameless cable -- the software comes up as "Thunderbird," but there's neither brand name nor model on the cable itself -- looks to be pretty cheaply made, with crooked sticky labels on the blue plastic lump in the middle of it. In fact, the first one I got didn't work at all. The replacement functions as advertised, thank goodness.

Using it can be a little awkward, even apart from the fact that file transfer is all you can do. For example, once in a while I run into odd restrictions from file permissions, and can't copy a file from B to A using A. In such cases I usually can copy it from B to A using B. Why this should be I don't know.

If you create new files on one of the machines while they're connected, those files won't show up on the other one until you deliberately refresh it, not even if you navigate to another folder and then back. You'd expect to find the refresh command in the menu under View or System -- but no.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald J. Reith on July 27, 2011
I'm computer illiterate and I bought 3 different cables trying to transfer files from one computer to another. There's several ways to do file transfers but I chose to use this method. As soon as I connected both computers using the Thunderbird DirectLink it started up immediately. All I had to do was click and drag which files I wanted to transfer and it was done! It took less than 5 minutes. I am very satisfied with it's performance and it did exactly want I wanted to do. I am so happy that I got it! By the way, I was transfering files from Windows 7 to Windows XP...WORKED PERFECTLY!!! Only thing different for me was, I purchased the cable from Qualitycables.com and paid $30.87 for it. Had I known it was here on Amazon, I might've saved a few dollars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr Lapin on February 18, 2009
If you're old enough to remember Laplink from the MSDOS days, this gadget will seem a bit familiar. The implementation is different -- Laplink used the parallel printer ports, and this uses the USB ports -- but the functionality is remarkably similar. Like Laplink, it provides only for the transfer of files from one machine to another. You can't open or create a file on the other machine like you could with a real peer to peer network connection. Programs will navigate to the "virtual drive" that represents the linked computer, but they won't display any files on it.

Another limitation is that as far as I know, this device only works on Windows computers. I've used it successfully with a mix of Windows 98, Windows 2000, and Windows XP computers. I haven't tried it with Windows 95 or Vista.

The cable is plenty long for most purposes. The little blue plastic bauble with the crooked, pasted-on "Data Transfer - Made in China" labels in the middle of the cable contains a tiny circuit board with what I assume is some disc-like hardware, and a small utility program in ROM (thunderbird.exe).

Plug it in (if you're using Windows 98, you'll need to first install the included driver), fire up the Thunderbird program on both computers, and voila -- on each computer your screen divides top to bottom, and there you see the disk drives of both computers, including network drives. You can drag files back and forth. The transfers are tolerably speedy for most moderate size files, but if you're transferring a lot of data, plan on a long coffee break -- again, this is reminiscent of Laplink.

Here are a few tips.

Remember that on both machines, you have to open My Computer and then double-click the drive called Thunderbird to start the program.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John H. Bragg on December 2, 2009
Verified Purchase
This product works well on Windows computers and I have no issues with the product.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ryan M. Roberts on January 24, 2010
Verified Purchase
I am having similar problems as one other review listed: the cable is not working. After eleven attempts it worked once, then hasn't worked again in almost 60 attempts and counting. I constantly receive errors that state the drive is corrupted or the program in not a win32 application. The concept is outstanding, but I question the quality of work and materials the unnamed company put into this product.
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