and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $49.50
  • Save: $2.47 (5%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Friday, April 18? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Ucontent: The Information Professional's Guide to User-Generated Content Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1573874250 ISBN-10: 1573874256

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$47.03
$12.00 $10.20

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Information Today, Inc. (February 6, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573874256
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573874250
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,037,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A thorough and thoughtful guide to Web 2.0, providing historical background on user-generated content and a field guide to Web 2.0 applications. Especially valuable for information professionals and all those who work with the web. --Ron Gilmour, natural sciences librarian, Ithaca College

Nicholas Tomaiuolo's very personal journey into user-generated content makes UContent the go-to book in the field. UContent is an amazingly detailed and highly accessible entry into the world of content produced by the general public. --William Badke, author, Research Strategies: Finding your Way through the Information Fog

Thorough. Timely. Easy-to-read. Apropos. These are some of the words I use to describe Nick Tomaiuolo s book UContent: The Information Professional's Guide to User-Generated Content. The internet is not just about consuming content but about creating it as well. This book, written in style that is very easy to understand, describes and documents how to do the writing part of the read/write web. Tomaiuolo covers everything from the creation of books for Project Gutenberg to blogging to Yahoo! Pipes to folksonomies. Each chapter provides the what's, how's, and why's for content creation. The examples are plentiful, and the discussions are backed up with interviews from industry pundits. The morphology of many internet-specific words included in the book makes the reading even more interesting. A fun book to read, it is worth the time of any librarian who wants to exploit Web 2.0 technology. --Eric Lease Morgan, digital projects librarian, University of Notre Dame

From College and Research Libraries:

Tomaiuolo is not just giving us a book on fads in cyberspace. His text notes both in the introduction and the conclusion the large numbers of Internet users who contribute to user-generated content and the faith that Internet users can place on such content. Tomaiuolo offers both success stories for information professionals (such as the extremely fruitful collaboration between the U.S. Library of Congress and the Flickr Commons to make historical images freely available on the web) and cautionary tales (such as the efforts of volunteer mapmakers from India for an early Google project to create maps that showed Pakistan as part of their country). Throughout, though, the focus of his text is more on introductory description to each tool and a "shortcut guide" to how each might be helpful to the work of librarians and information professionals.... UContent can serve as a reference librarian's reference in the brave new world that we inhabit. Timothy J Hickey, Kent State University.

From Public Libraries:

Tomaiuolo discusses the pros and cons of wikis, podcasting, screencasting, and slide and video sharing. Many of the examples he gives are based on academic settings but public libraries can use the software for their own purposes such as reader's advisory or patron education. The author also reveals the benefits and pitfalls of using Facebook, Social OPACs, Wikipedia, Flickr, and e-publishing tools. Chantal Walvoord, Rockwall County (Texas) Library

More About the Author

Nick Tomaiuolo earned his MLS at Southern Connecticut State University
where he was named a Scholar of the School of Library Science and
Instructional Technology, inducted into Beta Phi Mu (the International Library
and Information Studies Honor Society), and has been designated a Distinguished Alumnus. He is a full professor at both Central Connecticut State University and the University of Maryland University College where he teaches online information literacy courses.

Likes: database searching, literature, marottes, Stratocasters, theater, and travel. Dislikes: hubris, martinets, opportunists, and technology for technology's sake.

His first book, The Web Library, was published in 2004. His second book UContent: the Information Professionals Guide to User-Generated Content was published in January 2012. Nick also writes for Online Searcher Magazine, and Information Advisor.


Web Page: http://web.ccsu.edu/library/tomaiuolon/cse.htm (see also: http://web.ccsu.edu/library/tomaiuolon/theweblibrary.htm and http://web.ccsu.edu/library/tomaiuolon/UContent/toc.htm )

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By reader on June 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a detailed, comprehensive study, well documented and well supplied with examples of the author's personal experience generating various forms of user-generated content. He covers the history of U-content, blogs, wikis, yahoo!pipes, custom search engines, cybercartography, and almost every chapter features an interview with luminaries in the field, such as Project Gutenberg's founder, the late Michael Hart and Librarian/blogger Walt Crawford. Tomaiuolo deals with such intriguing issues as the "Sinister Side(s) of Facebook", "The Dark Side of Self-Publishing" and the integrity of online customer reviews. After you finish it you will know everything necessary about the subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Rebecca Mugridge on February 4, 2014
Format: Paperback
User-generated content, or UContent, as author Nicholas Tomaiuolo has dubbed it, has become an significant part of the web resources that we use and access every day. In this book, Tomaiuolo explains why user-generated content is important for libraries and librarians, and provides direction for integrating it into collections. In many cases he provides instruction for contributing to UContent ourselves.

There are many types of user-generated content, and Tomaiuolo devotes a chapter to each. After a brief introduction to UContent, he delves into one of the earliest examples of user-generated content, which is Project Gutenberg (PG). This unique resource has continued to grow, and many librarians and other enthusiasts continue to make contributions to the online collection. Tomaiuolo walks the reader through the steps necessary to contribute a new work to PG, and recounts his own experiences along the way.

In subsequent chapters Tomaiuolo addresses many other types of user-generated content. Blogs created by librarians and libraries are addressed in Chapter 3, and podcasts and other video resources are addressed in Chapter 5. In a very thought-provoking exploration of wikis, Tomaiuolo discusses not only the use of wikis for information sharing within and across libraries, but also the possibilities that exist for librarians to contribute content to well-known wikis, such as Wikipedia. He encourages librarians to add information about their unique content to Wikipedia, and to provide links in Wikipedia to resources housed in libraries’ special collections.

Other chapters address user-generated content that libraries should consider making available to their patrons. These include self-published materials and access to “citizen journalism.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Experienced reference and instruction librarian Nick Tomaiuolo's (aka the Web 2.0 Librarian) new book is a must-have for all librarians involved in digital content. UContent clearly describes various user-generated content (UGC) tools and how librarians can implement these in their library work and personal development.

UContent is targeted toward the beginner in UGC but tricks and tips will be welcomed by more advanced users. UContent isn't pretty. It's a bare-bones how-to do-it-yourself approach, but it works.

Since the content of the book can easily become outdated, Tomaiuolo has created an excellent website to accompany the book. The most important chapters are on blogs, audio and video services, social bookmarking, and Flickr.

Tomaiuolo provides an overview of the service as well as interviews with expert users or developers. Most importantly, he demonstrates how these services have been implemented by other librarians. This provides real-life demonstrations of the possibilities of UGC and acts as a jumping-off point for developing your own content. And, like any good librarian, he has a terrific bibliography for each chapter. UContent is sure to become a handy reference book for librarians as the enter the Web 2.0 world of UGC.

*Please note I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andy Shuping on August 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
This detailed and well written book, provides a chapter by chapter breakdown on various user-generated content sites, such as Project Gutenberg, Wikis, Blogs, and more. The author provides first hand experience in a number of chapters of how he submitted an item, such as to Project Gutenberg or Wikipedia, allowing the reader to follow along as he navigates how the products work. He also provides background and history to the products, as well as interviews with people familiar with the material. For those that are like me, experienced with new technologies and navigating ucontent, then the book really doesn't have a lot of new information, but the interviews are interesting. However, for those that are new to the area of user generated content, then this is the perfect book to follow along and discover something new.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa3a2c57c)