Prime Music Sweepstakes

Uh-Oh

November 25, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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4:43
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3:52
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3:36
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5:20
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4:31
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4:22
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4:15
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3:37
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4:08
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4:23
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5:03
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4:59
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 28, 1992
  • Release Date: November 25, 2008
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1992 Sire Records Company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:49
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001A7ZJXA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #95,797 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Michael Sean on May 2, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Taking the happy Latin rhythms of "Rei Momo" and the pop inventiveness of his Talking Heads days, David Byrne finds the perfect balance between the two and crafts the record that "Naked" should have been. The horns and congas still pop up throughout the tracks, but the rock guitar gets brought back to the front of the mix. The first single, "She's Mad," masterfully sets the menacing feel of "Burning Down The House" next to Mapeyé, and the chorus on "Something Ain't Right" recalls the group sing-along on "Road To Nowhere." Byrne's singing and lyrics on "Girls On My Mind" and "Hanging Upside Down" harken back to the playfulness of classics like "Stay Up Late" and "Wild Wild Life." The wonderful "A Million Miles Away" was used as the theme song for Téa Leoni's short-lived FOX sitcom, "Flying Blind." The band features ex-Meters bassist George Porter Jr., world jazz percussionist Café, horn man Steve Sacks, trumpeter/arranger Angel Fernandez, and background vocalists Nona Hendryx, Dolette McDonald, and Nicky Holland. Tropicália legend Tom Zé even adds some sounds on the third track. This album contains some of Byrne's catchiest post-Heads material, drawing from (but not overdosing on) his world music interests while keeping it in the realm of the clever pop he became known for. This disc is a fine sampler of the various styles of David's solo work, and will prove an easy transition for Talking Heads fans.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. Oliveira on February 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD
David Byrne's albums always seemed to go by unnoticed, and with Uh-Oh, this is truly a crime. This album is so diverse and colorful and it really deserves some recognition. With the help of a lot of different musicians and instruments, this is a very bright and happy album. The comical opener, "Now I'm Your Mom" starts out a bit off-beat (musically and in subject matter), but includes a wondefully rhythmic chorus. Other highlights include "Girls On My Mind", in which Byrne's vocal delivery is extremely reminiscent of the latter days of Talking Heads, which is cool to hear. "Hanging Upside Down" has features enjoyable and fun lyrics with a driving guitar throughout. "The Cowboy Mambo (Hey Lookit Me Now)" is a very jumpy tune which truly captures the essence of 'Uh-Oh'. The album's closer, "Somebody", is also probably its best track with a very epic and large feeling which ends this album perfectly. Get this album now!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "richlatta" on October 28, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album is so much fun! Some of his wackiest songs, wildest lyrics and smoothest grooves!
Byrne was still getting flak from some quarters about breaking up the Heads when this came out. Despite the different reasons I've heard as to why this happened, I think you can hear from the recordings that he longed to branch out, work with other musicians and be in complete control. Look how many additional musicians played on the Talking Heads swan-song NAKED. He definately assembled some top notch players for UH-OH, and it really paid off.
Everything is great here; I gotta wonder about David Byrne fans that don't dig this record. Highlights include: "Twistin' in the Wind" with it's bizarre slice of life tales centered around a Washington D.C. family, "A Million Miles Away" with it's soaring chorus and absolutely dope groove and I'll never forget how I laughed when my rather conservative father yanked my tape out of the car stereo when it started playing the sex-change boogie "Now I'm Your Mom." LOL Ah, the memories.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This album uses instrumentation to elicit feeling about as well as any pop/rock albums in the last fifteen years has.
In Byrne's worldview, style has triumphed over substance and corruption reigns. Religion tells lies, and so does love. The guitar coils its way through all of this with aggressive rhythms buoying the often pugnacious, usually wry lyrics.
But like a lot of mockers, Byrne is having a good time. So many of these songs are tremedously joyful ("A Million Miles Away," "Hanging Upside Down," "Something Ain't Right") while also being troubled. The gorgeous "Tiny Town" is a rolling, winding song with strings and burbling horns and Byrne's near-falsetto voice. The horn doodles that bob around the "look where you're going" section at the end of "She's Mad" are ecstatic, transformative.
There really aren't any failures on this record--every song is so embued with energy and thoughtfulness. What could it take for someone not to enjoy this album?
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By SC on September 13, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Melding rock with latin sensibilities has always held a danger for all but the most gifted musicians. Byrne himself has produced a few different records in this style - Rei Momo, and a live video and tour - but these didn't really hit the spot, with the studio recording lacking the liveliness of a true latin band, and the tours sounding incoherent and unrehearsed. However "Uh Oh" stands out, as Bryne manages to truly hit the sweet spot, perfectly melding his dry satirical verses with the happy exhuberance of the latin band. The recording is absolutely superb, bursting with life and pointedly tongue-in-cheek lyrics.
Not only my favourite recording by Byrne, but one of my all time favourite albums.
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