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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Born to Die
What happened (according to interviews) was that after creating enough tracks for a CD, she met Dan Auerbach (of the Black Keys) and decided to redo many as single-take "live" performances at his studio. We may never know the original tracks, but the final ones have more bravura torch singing than her previous work. I'd give it about 4.5 stars. I don't think it...
Published 7 months ago by ScottARC

versus
86 of 121 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Del Rey Bricks Herself In Behind a Conventional 'Wall of Sound'
Music critics the internet over have been expressing polite surprise that Lana Del Rey selected Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys to produce 'Ultraviolence' (2014), her third album. But a careful reading between the lines suggests that their posts have actually been a roundabout way of saying, "Wow--what a huge mistake."

With 'Born to Die' and 'Paradise' (2012)...
Published 7 months ago by The Wingchair Critic


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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Born to Die, June 29, 2014
By 
ScottARC (San Antonio, TX) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
What happened (according to interviews) was that after creating enough tracks for a CD, she met Dan Auerbach (of the Black Keys) and decided to redo many as single-take "live" performances at his studio. We may never know the original tracks, but the final ones have more bravura torch singing than her previous work. I'd give it about 4.5 stars. I don't think it surpasses her previous work (both released and unreleased), but there are songs on UV that reach the same heights, and she's not really repeating herself stylistically. IMO, she chose the strongest material for the album's singles, and these match the quality of the strong singles from Born to Die. However, BTD seems more saturated with possible singles and also seems more unified in style than UV. On the other hand, UV has a greater sense of spontaneity and variety which is lacking from BTD. On the other hand again, lyrics are de-emphasized and are getting simpler in UV (imo). She only includes lyric snippets (printed over West coast photographs) in her liner notes.

UV starts with its longest song "Cruel World", whose lyrics relate to fond memories of a bad relationship and the relief of having it be in the past, after which songs seem to come in similar pairs. So, for instance, "Ultraviolence" and "Shades of Cool", which are both album singles, sound quite a bit like Bond-film songs. UV is a great example of "baroque pop" that gets strong emotions out of its arrangements (clavichord-like piano, synthetic strings, understated syncopated (?) tympanic drumming, and choral backings). SOC actually samples the James Bond theme in the guitar. It has "torch" singing in the verses, high bright vocals in the chorus, and (unintelligible) ad libs in the retro monster-guitar bridge. "Brooklyn Baby" (my favorite track) and "West Coast", which are also album singles, have autobiographic and geographic themes. While they are relatively happy songs, they are still ballads by pop standards. "Sad Girl" and "Pretty When You Cry" are about drugged-out boyfriends for whom the female protagonist has an unbreakable addiction. Both are jazzy or bluesy with some excellent torch singing in SG and some interesting bruised or about-to-cry singing in PWYC. These are followed by dark trip-hop songs about LDR's negative public opinion. "Money Power Glory" is a deliciously cynical character study of how her haters view her. "... My Way Up to the Top" is about a mysterious diss target, envy, and love. I especially like its distorted loon sample in the chorus, which is like a Born-to-Die flashback. Finally, a pair of nostalgic songs close the standard album. "Old Money" is a Born-to-Die/Paradise style song which mourns lost youth. The song samples (or at least refers to) music from Nino Rota's "What is a Youth" song from Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet film, which similarly mourns youth. So I have to wonder: why isn't this sample (and other samples in UV) credited? LDR's cover of "The Other Woman" (made famous by Nina Simone) has beautiful instrumental arrangements and many diva-esque moments. For instance, she powerfully wails the word "alone" when the lyrics run out but spends an additional 20 seconds slow scatting (like a stroll in the park) before ending the song on one last serenely sung "alone".

I really don't like the idea of bonus and region/vendor-exclusive tracks as it really murks up exactly what the release is; however, that said, the bonus tracks on the deluxe CD are good. "Black Beauty" was a song leak (and a fan favorite), whose leaking may have caused her next album to become UV rather than something else. Following are "Guns and Roses", which is probably not about Axl or the group, and "Florida Kilos", which is definitely about cocaine. Whether FK glamorizes a bad lifestyle or is just a character study of her old chums is left for the listener to decide. In any case, FK is exciting for me because she uses her leaks/unreleased vocal style. With the bonus tracks UV is over an hour, though I still wish she'd have added other leaks from the time of "Black Beauty" and made a proper double album or maybe even a parallel one.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lana Del Rey's "Ultraviolence" is both beautiful and different, June 27, 2014
This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
Lana Del Rey's album is gorgeous, filled with raw vocals and heartfelt lyrics. I really love Ultraviolence because it is so different. She really is unique, and personally, I feel as if her individuality is what gives the album its strength. The music and lyrics are bare, not diluted with excessive synthetic sounds or other fluff. She deals with serious topics in her songs, and her lyrics are laced with realism, which makes her themes generally both dark and somewhat depressing.

Because of this, I was a bit disappointed the first time I listened to Ultraviolence. I am a huge fan of Born to Die, even though the album has a reputation for being incoherent and inconsistent. Except for a few of her songs here and there, I have absolutely loved her work. Ultraviolence is definitely not Born to Die, and although I was somewhat sad that the album lacks the upbeat songs that Born to Die featured, such as "National Anthem" or "Off to the Races", I eventually found myself loving Ultraviolence.

I feel like Ultraviolence is either a hit or miss for certain people. At first, I felt like I had been robbed because a lot of the tracks sound similar. Of course, after listening a few times, I don't feel that way at all, but I recommend you listen through the album a few times before buying it, or just purchase individual songs that you like.

Lana has quite a few standouts on her album. I absolutely love "West Coast", "Brooklyn Baby". "Shades of Cool", "Money, Power, Glory", "Old Money", and "The Other Woman." In my opinion, her weaker tracks are "Ultraviolence", "Cruel World", and "Pretty When You Cry".

In conclusion, I would say that Ultraviolence is a very artistic, unique album, that could be subject to both criticism and praise. I recommend you purchase this album if you love this genre, Lana's past music, or if you are looking for something different than most popular music. If you aren't sure, I highly recommend you listen before purchasing.
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36 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ballads from the Desolation Angel.......Lana Del Rey, June 17, 2014
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This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
Believe me when I say this.....the more you play this the more it gets under your skin....sorrowfully beautiful. For my tastes....this is her best yet. Not just pop music.....this is art.

I love her voice and the sound of this album.... a wall of beautiful sound. The smoky, slurred, sexy and at the same time vulnerable and doom laden vocals. The musicians get the groove going and keep it going with just the right touch, excellent production. I'm not going to break down every song here but there are many similar themes ....... self destructive characters looking for life and love..... born to lose and born to die......There's some of this in everybody. Psychological and physical pain travels with us all of our days. The desire to find love and peace in another person can be wonderful or it can be hell....or both.....and very few artists convey it as well as this "Sad Girl"

This is another excellent, artistic album by a uniquely American artist that the critics may never catch up with. She had planned on having Lou Reed on this album but he had an appointment he had to keep.... an appointment we all have and I believe that's what is behind all of the sorrow of Lana Del Rey.... I think it's the vulnerability to psychological pain and the overwhelmingness of life, the beauty and the horror of it all that people are picking up from her. They either get it or they are repelled because of fear. She makes stunning videos to accompany her beautiful music. She is an artistic genius.

When I listen to her music I think of the Beat Poets.....Listen to Jack Kerouac, ".......anyway, I wrote this book, because we're all gonna die....in the loneliness of my life, my father dead and my brother dead and my mother........ far away."..... That is the reason real artists create, to speak to life and death and God.........."This is the girl".....the Real Thing.

"Death Takes a Holiday"......only in Hollywood.....But you know that, don't you?......Good work, Lana Del Rey.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vladimir: The air is full of our cries!, December 1, 2014
This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
I almost never write reviews for music because I am not very good at writing about music. I feel like I lack the vocabulary to explain what I like or do not like about music and whenever I try to talk about music it feels like I am just stuttering or desperately searching for words in the dark. There are no art forms as immediately powerful as music - it is the one art form I don't think I could live without - but I never feel as inarticulate as I do when I try to talk about music. I had to write a review for this album anyways because I was so blown away by it. I had never even heard of Lana Del Rey until yesterday, but I discovered her by accident as I was browsing around the internet, and as soon as I listened to a couple of tracks on YouTube I had to rush to the store and pick up her newest album immediately - and to put things in perspective, I cannot remember the last time I felt the impulse to actually buy an album, as opposed to simply listening to a few of my favorite tracks on YouTube (I know, I am a terrible person).

If I had to describe Lana Del Rey's music - or this album at least - I would say it combines the "hipness" of Velvet Underground, with elements of jazz singing, pop, rock and roll (of course) and perhaps a bit of hip-hop, and in its combination of genres it winds up creating something that sounds genuinely new. I love it when I hear something that makes me hear "old" music in a new way. I like Velvet Underground - though I have never gone very far down the Lou Reed rabbit hole - but I almost never listen to jazz, pop, or hip-hop. I feel like listening to Lana Del Rey has provided me with a new perspective on genres I do not usually listen to and made me want to return to those genres and give them a closer look. There have only been a handful of artists that have made me radically reexamine my musical tastes, and made me want to explore genres that I had been relatively uninterested in before listening to them, but Lana Del Rey belongs on that short list. Even if there truly is "nothing new under the sun" it is always amazing to me when someone manages to put the same elements that are available to everyone else together in a new and unique way.

The religious writer Simone Weil wrote that "the cry of Christ and the silence of the Father together make the supreme harmony, that harmony of which all music is but an imitation." I think I have been misremembering that quote for a long time. I thought she said something like "All music is an imitation of Christ's cry on the cross 'My god, my god, why has thou forsaken me!'" I actually like my memory of the quote better (though Weil expresses herself better than I). Despite my mistake, the point I want to make remains the same: I have never been very impressed with technical proficiency or "cleverness" in music. I like music that sounds to me like a cry of despair echoing in "the silence of the Father" or "the silence of the universe", if you prefer. This is a fancy and round about way of saying I prefer emotional power to technical mastery. I want music that makes me feel like I am one with Schopenhauer's noumenal will. This album is definitely "hip" in places, and perhaps even "clever", but it does not sacrifice emotional depth or power. When I listen to music that really connects with me I feel as if there is something deep within me singing along, as if the music managed to articulate an inarticulate cry of despair that lay latent in my own breast, and that is how I feel listening to this album.

So, that is how I feel about this album in a nutshell. As a final thought I will just say this: anyone who disagrees with anything expressed in this review is simply wrong and should be ashamed of themselves. Now, go by this album!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Absolutely Amazing Piece of Music!, July 7, 2014
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This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
Wish I Could Give Ultraviolence 6 stars! This beautifully produced piece of music proves to the haters that Lana Del Rey is a talent to be reckoned with. Ultraviolence plays like a 1970's rock opera. On this latest outing Lana pushes her vocals to the front of the music
and how anyone can deny that she has an exquisite voice is just not listening. Ultraviolence is dark, haunting and exquisitely beautiful. Lana's songwriting skills continue to amaze. Her choice of producer on Ultraviolence was brilliant. These dark songs
stay in your head leaving a lasting impression of both melancholy and joy. The enigma of Lana Del Rey is always present throughout
Ultraviolence. Standout tracks are ALL of them. As Lana evolves as a singer and songwriter she continues to amaze
and bring great pleasure to her fans. Congratulations Lana on a job well done. Ultraviolence is spectacular! You are truly loved.
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53 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Born to die for, June 17, 2014
This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
"The record is finished and it's beautiful. And don't worry, you will love Ultra. It's so wrong and exquisite, it is absolutely gorgeous. Darker than the first; so dark it's almost unlistenable and wrong. But I love it." This was Lana Del Rey, talking to Twitter in early 2014, discussing her -then- upcoming album. She could not have been more accurate. Although it is not a radical departure from "Born to die", the songwriting on "Ultraviolence" is stronger, the lyrics more reflective, the melodies more engaging, the delivery sharper. Teaming up with The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach has given a rougher, more raw take on her fascination with classic American iconography, sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll, toning down the orchestral extravaganza of the previous album with a darker, more sensual sound.

There is not a standout song here, at least not upon first listening. One's enjoyment of "Ultraviolence" depends on how easily they can appreciate the subtle details, demonstrating Del Rey's force in the most unforced manner. If you were to take Marilyn Monroe, Kurt Cobain, Nancy Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Nina Simone, Leonard Cohen, Tori Amos and Jessica Rabbit, and roll them all up into one, Lana Del Rey would be the outcome, and this record the product. Slightly over-melodramatic and monotonous at times, but captivating and highly addictive, "Ultraviolence" may seriously be another masterpiece in music, it is an almost flawlessly executed record. Complicated romance has found its muse, the world an icon to obsess with and to worship. Fixation guaranteed, why not indulge?
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hypnotic Intoxication, July 2, 2014
This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
Wonderfully hypnotizing. Her voice is produced with an echo effect on most of the songs making for a very trippy album and a total success. Her mixture of something dreadful, her pervasive sadness and now on this one a kind of drugged delirium and rapturously, hauntingly beautiful melody and her lovely voice is a lethal cocktail meant to be drunk again and again. That mixed second chord (on the word violence) on ultraviolence is a beauty, can't get it out of my head. If you're a Lana Del Rey fan you will love this guaranteed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Missing the hip hop....., December 20, 2014
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This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
When I first heard Born to Die I have to admit that I wasnt a fan of Lana. Im a vocalist and I wasnt impressed with her vocals. They seemed flat, boring and lifeless. But something kept making me want to come back to it, to listen more. I dont know what it was, but I eventually loved BTD and found myself intrigued. I dont think that any of her albums or singles since then have matched it and I think I know why. I miss the hip hop.....the catchy beats. I know many critics didnt like that about BTD but I believe that was what I liked the most. So....on to Ultraviolence, it is still a good album. Shes still got the spiraling lyrics, sad undertones and chaotically beautiful sound. But, the hip hop/trip hop beats are not there and I miss them so. Would love to see more of that in the future, but I still really like this album. Its good to change it up a bit and I think thats what Lana has done. My favs on the album would be Cruel World, Ultraviolence, West Coast, Money Power Glory, Old Money. Shes the ultimate sad girl......bad girl....sad girl.
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86 of 121 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Del Rey Bricks Herself In Behind a Conventional 'Wall of Sound', June 17, 2014
This review is from: Ultraviolence (Audio CD)
Music critics the internet over have been expressing polite surprise that Lana Del Rey selected Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys to produce 'Ultraviolence' (2014), her third album. But a careful reading between the lines suggests that their posts have actually been a roundabout way of saying, "Wow--what a huge mistake."

With 'Born to Die' and 'Paradise' (2012) Del Rey--whose given name is Elizabeth Woolridge Grant--created one of the freshest sounds in contemporary music and, simultaneously, a playful, somewhat vampish torch singer persona to go with it.

Songs like 'Born to Die,' 'Video Games,' 'Summertime Sadness,' 'Ride,' 'Bel-Air,' and 'Yayo' all have a raw, stripped-back 1950s vibe, one veiled in a crisp Angelo Badalamenti-esque mystique and then additionally layered in an aural collage of hip hop, house and electronica samples, beats and effects.

Few younger artists have reflected the talent for melody that Del Rey has shown: musically speaking, the best songs on 'Born to Die' and 'Paradise' are actually little more than several irrepressible pop hooks merged together at intervals and then repeated, and repeated again.

Del Rey's creative 'formula' is one that, on paper, shouldn't work under any circumstance in any configuration, but does work, and works miraculously. But that is what artistry, alchemy and genius are all about: Del Rey almost single-handedly made pop music interesting again.

But now the question arises: is Del Rey the actual genius--or her producers?

Patrik Berger, Jeff Bhasker, Chris Braide, Emile Haynie, Justin Parker, Rick Nowels, Robopop, Al Shux, Dan Heath, Tim Larcombe and Rick Rubin all worked on the production of her first two major label releases and contributed enormously to their creative success. Their 'amateur-sounding on purpose' approach has been critical in defining Del Rey, and it was probably their genius that allowed the vocal strain and broken notes in Del Rey's performances to remain present on one track after another.

While 'West Coast,' the brooding first single from 'Ultraviolence' slightly evolves the classic Del Rey sound (and seems as if it was recorded under entirely different circumstances from the rest of the album, making the early-release track a kind of bait-and-switch), the production on most of the other tracks--'Cruel World,' 'Shades of Cool,' 'Brooklyn Baby,' 'Sad Girl,' and the title track--strips the zeitgeist and everything distinctive out of Del Rey's sound and replaces it with 'polished,' 'mature' and 'sophisticated' traditional rock arrangements (the album was recorded with a seven-piece band).

The oddly plodding opening track, 'Cruel World,' has the thump-thump backbeat of the Velvet Underground's 'Venus In Furs' (1967), while 'Pretty When You Cry' steals the opening cords from the Rolling Stones' 'Angie' (1973) and has a vocal reminiscent of Marianne Faithfull's original recording of 'Sister Morphine' (1969). The bombastic electric guitar solo on 'Shades of Cool,' not intended ironically, underscores everything misguided about the album.

The brief tinkling piano on 'Burning Desire' (2012), not one of Del Rey's better songs, has more verve than anything Del Rey and Auerbach have produced here.

The crucial 'Lana Del Rey' persona is no longer in the foreground, or necessarily present even in the background, on many of the tracks, despite the fact that what made Del Rey's initial work so appealing was her immediate, and often plaintive, presence in the forefront of every song. On the balance of 'Ultraviolence,' the Del Rey persona and voice, at least as listeners have come to know them, have largely disappeared under a 'wall of sound,' so that almost any talented female artist recording today could be the creative personality at hand--Neko Case, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Katy Perry, Pink, even Lady Gaga.

Where is the subtle Del Rey charm, the intelligence, the mischievous sense of fun, the daring, the wit?

'Brooklyn Baby' attempts to be conventionally witty--and thus isn't witty at all. The effervescent persona Del Rey presented on 'Born to Die' and 'Paradise' was someone the listener spontaneously sympathized with and wanted to accompany on her strange and curious journey, but the Del Rey of 'Ultraviolence' seems little more than an emotionally stunted harridan to whom nothing new can or will ever happen again.

The earlier albums were awash in moments of emotional catharsis, but there is not a moment of authentic catharsis anywhere on 'Ultraviolence,' though 'Old Money,' which riffs on Nino Rota's theme for 'Romeo & Juliet' (1968), comes closest. Despite its title and tough girl stance, all of the 'Ultraviolence' tracks combined don't have the bite of 'Gods & Monsters' (2012).

Needless to say, Del Rey's occasional rare talent for conveying pure visionary experience in a credible manner is absent as well.

To compound an already egregious situation, Auerbach has flattened Del Rey's melodies, compressing them as meticulously as her previous producers kept them buoyantly afloat. It isn't hard to imagine what Rick Rubin would have made of 'Cruel World,' 'Brooklyn Baby' or 'Florida Kilos,' since Del Rey's signature hooks and melodies are as present as they've ever been. Only 'Money Power Glory' is allowed any Oomph.

It is difficult to conceive how Del Rey thought this approach, which almost completely obliterates her carefully-crafted artistic and public persona, was a wise move. If Del Rey felt that Lorde, or any other performer, had stolen her signature sound, then Del Rey should have stood her creative ground instead of abandoning that sound to a lesser entertainer, who now owes it, while Del Rey is left with the dead end of 'Ultraviolence.'

And it's not as if Del Rey, with her enormous catalog of commercially unreleased tracks, hadn't produced genuinely viable rock songs before: the riveting 'Velvet Crowbar,' said to have been recorded in 2010, sounds like a blissful marriage of the Patti Smith Group and the Runaways. So why did Del Rey sleepily accept the bland 1970s rock n' roll pastiches Auerbach has concocted here?

'Ultraviolence' reflects self-sanitization and sterility, not maturity. Its sound is ingrown, antisocial and narcotized.

Del Rey's earlier songs were also highly calculated, but that calculation was clever and subtly ironic, and consistently kept the listener slightly off-kilter, while the manufactured sound on the current release is boring and standardized. Even before the sophisticated listener hears a given song in full, he effortlessly anticipates the arrangements and can almost hear Auberbach suggesting, "Let's put a little blues guitar..right...here," and predictably, the instrument emerges.

Del Rey apparently isn't aware that an entire generation of female rockers--most notably Linda Ronstadt and Ann Wilson--watched their initial rightful fame become badly tarnished by external pressures to become "technically proficient," "respectable" and "more mature" vocalists and songwriters. In the next generation, the same syndrome affected Madonna and Tori Amos at various points in their careers. And now it has happened to Del Rey, who has seemed far too confident and perceptive to have been seduced down that particular rabbit hole.

'Ultraviolence' is certainly not a total loss. 'Old Money' is a brilliant piece of songwriting, and the extra tracks 'Black Beauty' and 'Is This Happiness' both have something of the old school Del Rey magic.

Del Rey wisely applies Camille Paglia's theory of spousal abuse to the title track, and though the themes explored on 'Money Power Glory' and '****ed My Way Up To the Top' were exhaustively mined Madonna over thirty (30) years ago, Del Rey sings both as if she's committing an authentic act of cultural transgression. Since both fail to be clever on any level, any attempted stabs at irony fall embarrassingly flat. Like the 'Shades of Cool' guitar solo, the point of view adopted on each both dates Del Rey and simultaneously maroons her in the present.

Why didn't Del Rey include upbeat, recently-composed songs like 'JFK,' 'Hollywood' and 'Angels Forever,' all of which have both strong melodies and an elusive, elegant power?

Critics who routinely embrace only the 'lofty' and 'the ambitious' will probably support 'Ultraviolence,' at least in theory. For the balance of Del Rey's admirers, the album may give new meaning to the words 'summertime sadness.'
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars :-), June 18, 2014
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At first, I was a bit dissappointed that Ms Grant wasn't again working with Justin Parker, Rick Nowels and other producers from the Born to Die and Paradise albums. Dan Auerbach from The Black Keys handles most of the production on Ultraviolence. I love the Black Keys, but upon first listen I felt like the Ultraviolence sounded too much like a Black Keys record. But after a few more listens, I realized that Lana's drunk-night-club-singer croon still really stands out. And Auerbach production truly is wonderful. I love this chick and filthy little mouth!
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Ultraviolence by Lana Del Rey (Audio CD - 2014)
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