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4.3 out of 5 stars
Unaccounted For
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
This is a young adult mystery and I really like it. The characters are rich and well-developed. The mystery is really that - a mystery that doesn't get solved until the very end. there is plenty of intrigue, and close calls. There is also realistic moral issues that have to be faced by these young people.

I think adults will like this as much as young adults. Of course, it is the young adults in the story who seek out and find the clues that unravel the mystery of Milo's father's death and the millions of dollars that have been embezzled from Wolverine motors.

There is also the element of young adult romance, which is handled very well by the author. It is there, but doesn't overwhelm the story.

Not wanting to give away the story, I will say that I enjoyed the book and hardly put it down until I had it finished. Mature young adult readers will love it.

I received a copy of the book in exchange for writing a review.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2011
Unaccounted For by Nan W. Cappo entertains as it rolls smoothly through to the revelation of how Milo's father died--suicide, accident, or murder? Characters are vividly drawn, and the SE Michigan setting is nicely realized. Good to see a YA/adult crossover novel set in the present-day environs of Detroit that deals with the difficult issue of how far can one go to help others. Wolverine Motors has its problems, but it does support a number of good people by providing work when other car companies are failing. Should Milo continue to undermine the foundations of the company when he begins to understand what might have happened to his father? Cappo gives her characters issues worth fighting for . . . issues that have no easy answers. Milo is likeable and has been raised well. His concern for his young siblings and his widowed mother is admirable. Added to this mix is the gorgeous daughter of the company president. . . . Cappo's multi-layered book delivers a good read. Enjoyed it!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on February 9, 2012
When I first received the email to read this book, Nan Cappo, author of Unaccounted For, she had said that this is a young adult book but was recently told it was more of a "new adult" book. I must say I agree (75%) and disagree (25%).

Unaccounted For, begins with a family getting over their fathers suicide to discover their house had been robbed during his funeral. Believing his father had taken the easy way to get out of his gambling debts, Milo Shoemaker is told a secret that destroys his heart. His father smuggled $1 million from the company he worked for, Wolverine Motors. But something just doesn't seem right, and Milo will find out the truth behind this whole thing.

This isn't a book I would normally pick up. But I decided to give it a shot anyway, thinking that I may just enjoy it. I was right for the most part.

I am an avid reader, so I can usually guess the ending of the book within the first 10 chapters. But Nan Cappo totally hid the ending well, I was never able to guess it until it was staring me in the face. The whole time I was hoping for the downfall of the bad guy. I kept thinking that soon they will get hard evidence of this mans crimes but things kept building and building and the puzzle pieces got tinier and tinier. What seemed to be a 25 piece puzzle turned into 500 piece puzzle. This must have taken a long time to completely formulate.

It was an enjoyable mystery and I definitely liked being able to understand the view points of Milo, Ellie, and Zaffer. But what I didn't like was the over attention to detail. And this is where I think its more for the mature YA reader or an adult. For it to be targeted to the young adult audience it has to be a little more vague. I'm not saying that all YA readers like vagueness but if they are anything like me, they like to be able to fill in the details a lot on their own. I tend to get bored when things are overly described. But I know for it to be a mystery, every detail is important, and Nan did a great job in looping all the information together.

In the end would I say that I'm glad I took the time to read this? Yes, I am. I really loved that ending, it was so unexpected and I practically held my breath through it. Would I recommend this to all readers? No, like I said, its more for the analytical mind of adults, but I can see how younger mature reader could enjoy it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 10, 2011
Unaccounted For was exciting, well-written, and made me wish my real friends were as smart and fun as these characters! Each chapter ends with a cliffhanger, and I absolutely didn't see the ending coming. Once I'd finished it the first time, though, I went back and read it again (that's how good it was) and I picked up on some subtle, cleverly-hidden clues I'd missed the first time around. The main character, Milo, has lots of personality and is fun to root for, and I loved his funny friend Zaffer. The triangle of Ellie's relationship with her father, her relationship with Milo, and Milo's relationship with Ellie's father is just a little twisted and had me wondering how it would all work out - but it did, and satisfyingly too. I'd put Nan Cappo in the same league with Nancy Farmer, Eloise McGraw, and Mary Stewart. If you like mysteries, good writing, and characters you wish you could invite to your next party, don't miss this book!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2011
Milo Shoemaker's father is dead; a victim of a suicide. When he finds books on how to commit fraud in his father's library, Milo wonders if his father is a cheat as well as a coward. But could his father have been conducting his own investigation of the mighty Wolverine Motors? Milo takes a year off from college and finagles a job with Wolverine. His best friend, Zaffer, is also hired so the two spend the summer infiltrating the Company. The book offers an array of suspicious characters: the owner of the company, Alf Farnon, the chief controller, Gordon/George Pearce, the owner's beautiful daughter, Ellie. There are stake-outs, chases, and a thrilling show-down. The ending is unsettling: it is difficult to tell the good guys from the bad guys.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 10, 2012
When I started this book, I didn't trealize it was categorized as a Young Adult genre. Unaccounted For is a story of heartbreak, mystery, morality, taking responsibility, and learning valuable life lessons while finding love. All this and a good who-dunit to boot. For me this was a book I continued to think about when I wasn't reading and couldn't wait to get back to. I highly recommend Unaccounted For to anyone looking for a good, wholesome read about monsters of the human kind where good wins out over evil. Or does it?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2012
Truthfully, this novel was a nice surprise. For the most part, it was well-written. Certain details became redundant after awhile. There was too much emphasis on Ellie's ability with a gun, the boys' survival skills, and something else that I, of course, can't remember right now. While I thought it was a decently written story, at times I felt like I was being led along more than I needed to be. I also had most of it figured out long before the resolution. That being said, I read a lot, and with the Kindle and all of the free books available, figure I will be reading my share of crappy writing. This book doesn't fall under that category, and I am happy I read it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 26, 2012
Nan Cappo has written a fast-paced, engaging mystery. I could not predict the ending until I turned the last page. But this book is far more than an exciting whodunit, it explores the meaning of courage, friendships, loyalty, through the challenges faced by its 17 year old protagonist, Milo Shoemaker.

The story begins with the "accidental" death of Milo's father; Milo, who had been counting on finishing his high school year, entering college with his best friend, now has to become the "man" of the house, helping his mother, going to work instead of college. Convinced his father's death is more than an accident, he boldly takes a job at the fire engine factory where his father had worked to find the murderer (if there is one). He's no saint or super hero, but you find yourself pulling for him as he struggles to balance his new work responsibilities, while sureptiously trying to investigate his father's death. Milo's quest is aided by his best friend and complicated the company president's sexy daughter. When's the last time you read about a teen who wants to stay chaste so he doesn't get weak?

Cappo masterfully builds the friendships and takes us with them when the plot turns dark and dangerous. Their search includes plenty of breath-holding suspense with scenes of brushes with exposure and confrontations. Their loyalty to each other, courage, and committment to doing the right thing; together with Milo's unrelenting search to find who his father really was, and what honor really means, is superbly written.

I guess what I like best about Cappo's book, is the real life way she presents the delimmas her character's face. They want to do what is right, but the way is not always clear, and truth can have devestating consequences. Milo's decision in the end surprised me, but I understood.

I can highly reccommend this book to young adults and older adults as well. I am sincerely hoping there will be a sequel to see what happens to the surving characters.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 18, 2011
Unaccounted For was a pleasant surprise--you can read it simply as an interesting mystery, but that would be selling it short. It starts with a coming of age story, adds mystery, sex, violence, and fire trucks in the Michigan heartland, and weaves ethical dilemmas into the plot so nimbly that they don't slow down the action. A college age accounting student with sex appeal? Who'd have thought it? The writing is clean and well constructed, with each chapter pulling you into the next. It feels like real people, not a formula. Well worth reading!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 1, 2012
Nan's second book captured my attention from the first page and I could not put it down. She developed characters that the reader could instantly connect with and portrayed southeast Michigan accurately. This is a must read for anyone 15+. The text is simple enough for middle school readers, but some of the content might be more appropriate for older readers. Nan challenges readers to question right and wrong and see that there may be times the line between both is blurred.
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