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Just add your daughter's Kindle to your account (add a device I think) and she will have an "archive" of everything that is currently available on your Kindle (you can see these by going to "manage my kindle." She will also have the ability to buy stuff, but it will charge to your account, so make sure you negotiate those details. :) We have a Kindle, two iPads, 2 iPhones and 3 iPod touches on our Kindle account. A few books can only be used by 5 devices at a time, so when one of us reads on of those books, we delete it from the device, not the account, so someone else can read it. And, no one but Mom and Dad are allowed to purchase books without asking. Works like a charm for us!
Dec 28, 2010 by D. Burton
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how about James Franco?? He's a bit similar in looks to the real Louie and has the lean build for the role of an athellete? It's an interesting thought - the book being made into a movie - but from what I've read in Louie's older biography (Devil at my Heels) previous attempts to make a movie out of his life stalled over his insistence on a proper portrayal of how important his religious awakening was to him. It will be interesting to see what film makers might do with the story.
Feb 2, 2011 by liat2768
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Chris-Read Empire of the Summer Moon, a true story of the American West. You won't be disappointed. Dora Gal.
Jan 7, 2011 by Dora Gal
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I believe the transformation Louis had when he got saved absolutely was the beginning for him in forgiving his enemies. A wrong is still a wrong and what was done to Louis could only be, from the Grace of God, where that forgiveness came from. It's a matter of "hate the sin, love the sinner". He wanted to show Watanabe that he (Watanabe) was accountable for what he did to the POWs, but he forgave him. And it all gets summed up when at the end of his letter he writes, "I hope you will become a Christian"....that says it all. He meant that in love. He wants Watanable to be saved. Truly, he forgave him!
May 28, 2011 by LMV
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i'm certain she knows the guy's name. Without a doubt, Zamperini remembers the name. I'm sure she chose not to publish the name out of respect either for the surviving family members or out of concern for a lawsuit. Her portrayal of the Lt. in question is brutally unflattering. If you recall, Zamperini originally left out the problems Mac caused on the life raft to respect his family. Mac's immediate family is likely all dead now (he apparently was not married or had any children before dying), and so publishing the details now is not an issue.
Feb 1, 2012 by Robert Johnson
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I became obsessed with WW2 at the same age as your son - cutting my teeth on Holocaust survivor stories made me study the entire history of the war and lent me towards a life-time interest in history so I don't think that such a survivor's story too strong for a mature young man. The hero goes through hell and back and in reading the book and learning about man's inhumanity to man he would also learn about the resilence of the human spirit to rise above all odds - fine lessons for a young boy entering puberty and manhood.
Feb 2, 2012 by Dudley Ristow
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After reading the other answers to this question, I am certainly in the minority. As a retired school social worker with 27 years experience, I think that requiring 13-14 year old students to read Unbroken is a very bad idea. If you have not read the book, do so ASAP and encourage other concerned parents to do this as well, especially fathers. As I said in my review, the torture scenes are very graphic and the sadism of many of the guards is terribly disturbing. I ended up skimming through some of it. Middle school is a tricky age. When I picture myself as a 13-14 year old girl, I know it would have been very upsetting to me. I was already dealing with anxiety and depression at that age and certainly did not need to have it increased. Suicide is also mentioned in the book as a way out of the pain. Students who have serious issues in their lives, often unknown to the staff, could have a very bad reaction. In my work, I knew of kids who looked very put together on the surface but were dealing with terrible problems at home. I do not know how the teachers and principal decided on this book. Have they all read it? What is the purpose? Ask to see the curriculum they are using to teach the book. Are there students of Japanese decent in the school, or kids who could be mistaken for Japanese? This book could be a tool for discrimination and bullying. In addition, Billy Graham and his version of Christianity is a key part of the book. There are long quotes from the Bible. This in and of itself makes it a bad choice for a public school, and could certainly be offensive to non-Christians. Christians may also have a problem with the type of Christianity being put forth. I strongly recommend that parents fight this, and I hope you win. You may need to take this to the superintendent and the school board, but only after you have spoken to the principal. Every adult involved in this requirement must have read the book thoroughly, or his or her opinions are meaningless. By the way, the calmer and more professional parents behave, the more likely they are to have this changed. It is very important that fathers are involved. Mothers can be dismissed as over protective and over emotional. A male spokesperson would not be a bad idea - although it offends my feminist ideals. If there is no way to change the requirement, wise parents can use the book as a learning tool and emphasize the positive elements of the human spirit, the power of forgiveness, the benefits of service to others, and the dangers of alcoholism and drug abuse, etc. Talk to the school social worker and psychologist. Ask if they have read the book. If they have not, encourage them to do so that they can have a say in this. By the way, Laura Hillenbrand's personal story is one of making a good life despite developing a serious and chronic disease, severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. She is a survivor in a different way. I suggest you read her article from the New Yorker - "A Sudden Illness". I would love to hear from you again. Mary E.
Mar 25, 2014 by Mary E.
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The audio version read by Ed Herman is very well done.
Oct 20, 2012 by Ronayne
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how many pages Oct 16, 2013
457 Pages
Oct 18, 2013 by BMo
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