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Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Hardcover


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Frequently Bought Together

Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted + Building with Secondhand Stuff: How to Re-Claim, Re-Vamp, Re-Purpose & Re-Use Salvaged & Leftover Building Materials + This Old House Salvage-Style Projects: 22 Ideas for Turning Old House Parts Into New Treasures for Your Home
Price for all three: $54.75

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Taunton Press (March 20, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1561588253
  • ISBN-13: 978-1561588251
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #106,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Salvaging architectural materials from old houses and commercial buildings has been a thriving business for years, but Falk and Guy are among the first to explain the process for the average homeowner and catalog the various tools of the trade. Numerous color photographs detail how houses are salvaged, painstakingly, to preserve all reusable materials, including hardware, woodwork, flooring, tiles, bathtubs, doors and windows.This is a book designed for people who want to tackle such a project themselves or supervise someone they have hired for the job. There are schematics, numerous safety tips, including warnings about now-banned toxins that may linger in very old housing materials, and suggestions for storage and rehabilitating treasures that have been damaged. --"Milwaukee Journal Sentinel"
Much of America's architectural heritage is ending up in landfills. Bob Falk and Brad Guy want to change that. The book is a guide to unbuilding, ' or deconstruction, the process of dismantling buildings that otherwise would be razed. The purpose is to save reusable elements such as building materials, fixtures and architectural details. Falk and Guy say deconstruction preserves the past, reduces costs, benefits the environment and has the potential to create jobs in urban areas, where they're needed most."Unbuilding"covers the many aspects of deconstruction, including site preparation, safety issues, tools, techniques and resale ideas. Interviews with successful salvagers are included, along with resources for those interested in deconstruction. "--Akron Beacon Journal"
"Unbuilding" explores the value of salvaged materials and describes the green art of "unbuilding" a home. Written bytwo salvage experts, the book explains how to safely dismantle a wall or an entire house, and examines the quality of such salvaged materials as hardwood flooring, windows, doors, mantles and period lighting. Sidebars and pullouts throughout the book provide helpful tips, such as how to remove flooring, cast-iron fixtures or vinyl siding. "--Smart Homeowner"
Patience can reward the diligent worker and help the planet as well, according to Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses (Taunton, $30, hardcover). Authors Bob Falk and Brad Guy fill a niche with their guide to deconstructing homes for salvage. It's a trend that has seen much use in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and its economic benefits can equal environmental ones for those willing to work.Falk and Guy make no bones about the work required, and Unbuilding is not for those unfamiliar with a hammer. Permits and code issues are glossed over, but the book supplies good strategy for laying out a deconstruction site. Readers will learn how to deal with lead-based paints and asbestos safely, and how to assess the value of interior fixtures. Ambitious and imaginative home wreckers will find a wealth of general tips and resources for taking down homes and finding hidden treasures. "--Orlando Sentinel"
"Unbuilding, Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses" (Taunton Press, $30) is all about the joys - and value - of deconstruction, mining old buildings for their treasures. Aimed at DIY-ers, professional builders, architects or homeowners interested in using reclaimed materials, the book by Bob Falk and Brad Guy deals with everything from dismantling a wall to unbuildingan entire house and supports the premise that deconstruction today is as fast and affordable as conventional demolition. And more importantly, much of the hardware, period lighting, doors and mantels is unmatched by today's building products. "--The Cincinnati Enquirer"

Review

Salvaging architectural materials from old houses and commercial buildings has been a thriving business for years, but Falk and Guy are among the first to explain the process for the average homeowner and catalog the various tools of the trade. Numerous color photographs detail how houses are salvaged, painstakingly, to preserve all reusable materials, including hardware, woodwork, flooring, tiles, bathtubs, doors and windows.This is a book designed for people who want to tackle such a project themselves or supervise someone they have hired for the job. There are schematics, numerous safety tips, including warnings about now-banned toxins that may linger in very old housing materials, and suggestions for storage and rehabilitating treasures that have been damaged. --"Milwaukee Journal Sentinel"
Much of America's architectural heritage is ending up in landfills. Bob Falk and Brad Guy want to change that. The book is a guide to unbuilding, ' or deconstruction, the process of dismantling buildings that otherwise would be razed. The purpose is to save reusable elements such as building materials, fixtures and architectural details. Falk and Guy say deconstruction preserves the past, reduces costs, benefits the environment and has the potential to create jobs in urban areas, where they're needed most."Unbuilding"covers the many aspects of deconstruction, including site preparation, safety issues, tools, techniques and resale ideas. Interviews with successful salvagers are included, along with resources for those interested in deconstruction. "--Akron Beacon Journal"
"Unbuilding" explores the value of salvaged materials and describes the green art of "unbuilding" a home. Written bytwo salvage experts, the book explains how to safely dismantle a wall or an entire house, and examines the quality of such salvaged materials as hardwood flooring, windows, doors, mantles and period lighting. Sidebars and pullouts throughout the book provide helpful tips, such as how to remove flooring, cast-iron fixtures or vinyl siding. "--Smart Homeowner"
Patience can reward the diligent worker and help the planet as well, according to Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses (Taunton, $30, hardcover). Authors Bob Falk and Brad Guy fill a niche with their guide to deconstructing homes for salvage. It's a trend that has seen much use in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and its economic benefits can equal environmental ones for those willing to work.Falk and Guy make no bones about the work required, and Unbuilding is not for those unfamiliar with a hammer. Permits and code issues are glossed over, but the book supplies good strategy for laying out a deconstruction site. Readers will learn how to deal with lead-based paints and asbestos safely, and how to assess the value of interior fixtures. Ambitious and imaginative home wreckers will find a wealth of general tips and resources for taking down homes and finding hidden treasures. "--Orlando Sentinel"
"Unbuilding, Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses" (Taunton Press, $30) is all about the joys - and value - of deconstruction, mining old buildings for their treasures. Aimed at DIY-ers, professional builders, architects or homeowners interested in using reclaimed materials, the book by Bob Falk and Brad Guy deals with everything from dismantling a wall to unbuildingan entire house and supports the premise that deconstruction today is as fast and affordable as conventional demolition. And more importantly, much of the hardware, period lighting, doors and mantels is unmatched by today's building products. "--The Cincinnati Enquirer"
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ted C. Reiff on March 27, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Taunton Press with their great sense of style and photography combined with knowledgeable authors, who have taken the time to document the deconstruction and salvage process, make this book a must in the bookcases of contractors, architects, designers and any building owner considering salvaging or using salvaged building materials.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Virginia Allain on April 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I've always liked the idea of salvaging architectural details from building being torn down. Now here's a book that goes way beyond merely saving a fireplace mantel or some columns. Here's what it covers:

Chapter 1 Unbuilding Opportunities
Redevelopment
Rural Property
Military Bases
Urban Renewal
Remodeling and Renovation
Building Auctions
Habitat for Humanity ReStores
What to Unbuild

Chapter 2 Deciding on Unbuilding and Salvage
Your Level of Involvement
Making Sure the Building Is Sound
Permits and Code Requirements
Making a Visual Survey
Case Study: Survey of a Deconstruction Candidate

Chapter 3 The Materials You Find
Develop a Plan for the Material You Remove
Assessing What's Reusable
Selling Your Stuff

Chapter 4 Getting Started
Organizing the Site
Tools for Unbuilding

Chapter 5 Safety and Environmental Health
Make Safety a Priority
Safety Equipment: The Last Line of Defense
Working at Height
First Aid and Medical Services
Fire Prevention and Protection
Lead-Based Paint Hazards
Asbestos Hazards

Chapter 6 Site Preparation and Soft-Stripping
House and Site Characteristics
Preparing the Site
Soft-Stripping
Loading Items from Soft-Stripping
Cleaning Up

Chapter 7 Whole-House Deconstruction
Maintaining the Building's Integrity
Roof Tearoff
Removing Interior Wall Finishes
Removing Electrical, Plumbing, and Ductwork
Removing Roof Sheathing
Removing Rafters
Getting the Material to the Ground
Taking down Trusses
Removing a Dormer
Removing Ceiling Joists
Removing Siding
Removing Walls
Removing Subfloors
Denailing
Stacking and Loading
Project Closeout
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on April 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
We live in an age of recycling. It's not only environmentally sound, but economically profitable. This applies just as much to reusable and salvageable building materials from structures scheduled for demolishing, as it does to ordinary newspapers and soda cans. Now U.S. Forest Products Laboratory research engineer Bob Falk has teamed up with Brad Guy (Director of Operations at The Hammer Center at the Penn State School of Architecture) to publish "Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures Of Unwanted Houses" an instruction guide to salvaging materials that can be reused and recycled from homes and other buildings by literally and carefully dismantling the original structures piece by piece. These materials can include ornate hardware, period lighting fixtures, windows, doors, mantels, hardwood flooring, and anything else that continues to have esthetic and commercial value. Often these are 'yesteryear' items that cannot be matched by anything available to day and have great financial worth in and of themselves. The authors draw upon their many years of expertise and experience in advising about new tools, deconstruction processes, and alternatives to conventional demolition tactics. "Unbuilding" is strongly recommended to the considered attention of building contractors, demolition experts, and environmentally conscious salvagers, as well as non-specialist general readers with an interest in recycling building materials for their value, utility and esthetics.
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By D. Vanwey on July 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased this book for my husband. Our local library didn't have and could not order it, so we bought a used copy which is in excellent condition. Book arrived in a timely matter and I would definitely purchase from the vendor again. As for the content of the book, I can't really say as my husband is the one reading it.
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