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Uncle Eric Talks About Personal, Career, and Financial Security (An Uncle Eric Book) Paperback – April 1, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0942617382 ISBN-10: 094261738X Edition: 2 Rev Exp

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Uncle Eric Talks About Personal, Career, and Financial Security (An Uncle Eric Book) + Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? A Fast, Clear, and Fun Explanation of the Economics You Need For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments (An Uncle Eric Book) + Whatever Happened to Justice? (An Uncle Eric Book)
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Product Details

  • Series: An Uncle Eric Book
  • Paperback: 187 pages
  • Publisher: Bluestocking Pr; 2 Rev Exp edition (April 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 094261738X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0942617382
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"'Uncle Eric Talks About Personal, Career, and Financial Security' by Richard J. Maybury, and all of Maybury's Uncle Eric series of books on economics, geopolitics, justice, and history...are excellent educational experiences for both children and adults. Just the discussion of the role of 'models' in the functioning of the human mind [in] the first book is worth the whole set. While this discussion is not about science, it describes perfectly the functioning of the minds of good scientists. They do not memorize facts against their models revising the models and checking the facts as they proceed." --Dr. Arthur B. Robinson, President and Research Professor, Oregon Institute of Science and Medicine, commenting on the previous edition of "Uncle Eric Talks About Personal, Career, and Financial Security"

"Homeschooling parents and children can gain much from the wisdom of Mr. Maybury. 'Uncle Eric Talks About Personal, Career, and Financial Security' will help young people get started on a more prosperous life, and it will help their parents see where improvements can be made in their own lives. This outstanding book is just a starting point for study with its many recommended additional resources. Begin with it and move through the Uncle Eric series for a complete four year, high school study of economics, government, business, 'life skills,' and current events." --Martha Robinson, Reviewer for HomeschoolChristian.com

About the Author

Richard Maybury, also known as Uncle Eric, is a world renowned author, lecturer, and geopolitical analyst. He consults with business firms in the U.S. and Europe. Mr. Maybury is the former Global Affairs editor of "Moneyworld" and widely regarded as one of the finest free-market writers in America. Mr. Maybury's articles have appeared in "The Wall Street Journal", "USA Today", and other major publications. He has penned eleven books in the Uncle Eric series. His books have been endorsed by top business leaders, including former U.S. Treasury Secretary William Simon, and he has been interviewed on more than 250 radio and TV shows across America.

More About the Author

Richard Maybury, also known as Uncle Eric, is a world renowned author, lecturer, and geopolitical analyst. He consults with business firms in the U.S. and Europe. Mr. Maybury is the former Global Affairs editor of "Moneyworld" and widely regarded as one of the finest free-market writers in America. Mr. Maybury's articles have appeared in "The Wall Street Journal", "USA Today", and other major publications. He has penned eleven books in the Uncle Eric series. His books have been endorsed by top business leaders, including former U.S. Treasury Secretary William Simon, and he has been interviewed on more than 250 radio and TV shows across America.

Customer Reviews

If you have children in high school or college...this book is a must read.
Dollarbill165
In this highly revelatory part of the book, Maybury explains how we as humans create "models" of how we think the world around us works.
Andrew R. Barnard
Richard Maybury is great at explaining the most complicated subjects in a very well thought out manner.
Boomer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By J. P. Ledbetter on July 28, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Do not confuse the 3 star rating with a negative evaluation. Quite the opposite is true. However when reading a series like this one must put them all into perspective.
I thouroughly enjoyed this book. It was just too short, it was overpriced for the length of the text and it is simply the tip of a much larger iceburg of political, social and historical thought that makes you close it saying "is that all there is, I want more, give me MORE!" Very well done actually, because it draws you into the other eight books in the series, and if you do not have them I highly recommend getting them all before you start.
I began by reading Mr. Maybury's "Are you Liberal or Conservative, or just confused?" Which I rated at five stars and was instantly hooked. I ordered the rest of the collection (the other eight) in one batch so as to get them all together so I could get started reading them in his recommended sequence as soon as possible.
This book however was no more than an hour read or so and left me starving and anxious to get into the rest of the soup.
His books are actualy fun to read and easily pull you into the world of "Uncle Eric." His considerable talents to educate, fasincate and bring the subject down to a desktop level of understanding, helping you to contemplate what was, what is and what should be in poltics, the economy, morality, education, justice and many other subjects is refreshing.
I have since moved on to "What ever happened to penny candy?" and am just as captivated by it as the last two. This first book sets the basic foundation for all his others, which is that there are models out there that we each react to. Regardless if it is moral, social, poltical, educational, family life, community standards and the like. There are good ones and there are bad ones.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By R. Schwartz on August 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
Maybury begins in discussing mental models or paradigms and how all data we obtain used to support or work with our internal models and how everyone has them and the failure of many educators to understand when obtaining data. We build models, sort data and there's an excellent outline of rules to weigh the evidence. Rather than simply trust the experts, we need to look more towards the hard sciences at least in business and financial security. Now to learn and teach models, in many cases simple stories are more effective than technical data.

Two important models of Maybury are the Austrian economics, which can be read in F.A. Hayek's book, "The Road to Serfdom" and Ludwig von Mises, "Planned Chaos," and the model of old British common law, which can be read in Maybury's "What Ever Happen To Justice." While most educations do not include models, the advice is to determine models, and in doing so, Maybury gives excellent advice or steps to obtain one and gathering evidence and a working hypothesis. I've read just about the same method in a more philosophical tone by others such as Ken Wilber and find this significant advice. And see if the model predicts to some accuracy and that it can be tested against other models you already do know.

The warning is given to avoid tautology and circular reasoning, which many fall prey to. To watch our for cognitive dissonance or emotional blockage to anyone that challenges your model and to always refrain from absolutism and certainty so you can refrain from the trap of cognitive dissonance with the flexibility and ability to grow in paradigm shifts or model changes. When noticing bad and/or evil actions it is the model behind the actions and data that you need to question.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Venture on June 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is written to educate teens and meets/exceeds expectations. Wish I would have known this information when I was a teen. I would have made wiser decisions. I read this book and will give the series to my 13 year old son.
This series of books is a great primer and provides a strong foundation in finance, investments, history, career, etc. Richard Maybury: job well done!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Andrew R. Barnard on March 11, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the first of a series of books by Richard J. Maybury, who calls himself "Uncle Eric". In his series, Maybury delves into some very important subjects. He has a very agreeable writing style that disguises the fact that he is discussing some extremely serious stuff. While the books are catered to a younger audience, I don't find his writing to be at all elementary. He does explain the definition of certain words and events that most adults are intimately familiar with, which may take some getting used to. There's a good reason these books are intended for the younger ones, and parents should be all means try to give these books to their children while they're still young. Once one is grown, it is much tougher to receive new information. These books are by no means politically correct and may be hard for older ones to accept. Still, I don't hesitate to recommend the series to anyone, regardless of age. The insight the author has shouldn't be missed merely because it was intended for fourteen-year-olds--adults need this stuff just as much as they do.

Now I'll give some time to discussing this particular book itself. Part One of the book is entitled "How the Mind Works". In this highly revelatory part of the book, Maybury explains how we as humans create "models" of how we think the world around us works. Probably the best way to describe Maybury's viewpoint is let him say it in his own words. From Chapter Two:

"A model is a mental picture of how the world works. Sometimes models are called paradigms.
"When someone drops an old model and adopts a new one, this is called a paradigm shift.
"Most of us don't realize it, but we devote a lot of time and effort to testing and improving our models, or paradigms, so we have a lot of faith in them.
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