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Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen (Reading Rainbow Book) Paperback – April 24, 1997


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 450L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; 1 edition (April 24, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688152856
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688152857
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 10.9 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #221,366 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3-- If good intentions made great picture books, this would be a winner. A young boy accompanies his after-school companion, Uncle Willie, to a city soup kitchen where Willie works daily. In a "bed-to-bed" manner of storytelling, readers are informed of the operation of the soup kitchen as the unnamed boy assumes the role of helper and narrator. There are some discrepancies in the text. How could the steaming soup pots on the stove "make the whole place smell delicious" before any of the ingredients have been added? If the soup kitchen is "small and bright," how does it hold 125 people? These inconsistencies, however, are not so much of a drawback as the didactic tone. The competent pictures in soft pastels are sufficient to tell much of the story, but the long, repetitive text makes this book difficult to use as a read-aloud for story hours. Although this seems to be an accurate picture of a topic that is certainly of current concern, the format suggests a younger audience than the one for whom the subject matter would be most interesting and relevant. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Successful. . . .This is informative and new, but not scary." -- -- Booklist

More About the Author

DyAnne DiSalvo is an American artist and author of children's literature, best known for her string of books which focus on building better communities, including City Green, Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen and Grandpa's Corner Store.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A. Hogan VINE VOICE on January 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Uncle willie and the soup kitchen is a beautiful,wonderful book to read with a child. It presents a young boy and his Uncle willie as he gathers food to prepare at a soup kitchen in which he works.The fact that Uncle Willie considers the denizens his guests, and not moochers or people looking for a handout is deeply moving. No treacly sentiment,no preaching, this is a lovely story which made me cry upopn first reading it.I read it with my kids, and have pressed copies upon others since discovering it in a remainder bin! My first grade class adored it, and it stimulated a great discussion afterwards on hunger poverty and helping.Reaaly very well done.Moving gentle loving,belongs in every library.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
Can a soup kitchen be warm and inviting? It can when Uncle Willie works there.
When his nephew has a day off from school, Uncle Willie invites him to spend the day helping him at the soup kitchen. Although hesitant at first, the young boy discovers, that in Uncle Willie's eyes, that the food collected from his neighborhood is not just food, but preparation for a feast. To Uncle Willie, the soup kitchen visitors aren't strangers. They are his guests.
You'll travel with Uncle Willie and he gathers donated food throughout the neighborhood. His enthusiasm is so contagious all along the way that you'll almost be able to smell the food cooking. Pay careful attention to the illustrations as every page offers a look into the spirit of the kitchen, who pays a visit, and the inner workings of a successfully run organization. You'll find bright posters, a cheery staff, and inviting table arrangements.
While the book is directed at children aged 4-8, anyone will come away with a positive feeling and enough working knowledge to get them started in volunteering.
To further discussions on hunger and poverty, you'll want to make sure to read the introduction. It's a good starting point for asking your local librarian for help in finding out more about the subject.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Reader Belle on October 15, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book was fine. This book was too long to read to preschool children but older children is okay. This was a Food Bank purchase for Hunger Action Month.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By KayShoe on August 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was a little worried when I first leafed through this book that it would be too lengthy for my first graders. After reading through it, I think the students will be able to sit through a read-aloud while remaining engaged with the story. The book introduces children to the concept of homelessness/working poor without burdening them with too much detail. I plan to incorporate the story into lessons focusing on “empathy” and finding ways to be helpful/contribute. I like the simplicity of the story but also the fact that it is not at all judgmental in its tone. I know I have students who have eaten at our local shared meals program and receive food through our food bank.
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By Jocelyn on March 21, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Overall I really like this book. I have two complaints. First off, it's hard to read without getting a little teary eyed. But I'm like that with reading sad things. And my second issue is that it's a little boring for young kids. My son is able to sit and listen to much longer chapter books, but always loses focus with this one. A great book to teach about helping others and gently let children know that there are people so poor they may not even be able to buy food, a concept very foreign to my son.
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