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Unconscious God Hardcover – November 18, 1975


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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 161 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (November 18, 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671220993
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671220990
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #976,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Viktor E. Frankl was professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna Medical School until his death in 1997. He was the founder of what has come to be called the Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy (after Freud's psychoanalysis and Adler's individual psychology)--the school of logotherapy.

Born in 1905, Dr. Frankl received the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna. During World War II he spent three years at Auschwitz, Dachau and other concentration camps.

Dr. Frankl first published in 1924 in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis and has since published twenty-six books, which have been translated into nineteen languages, including Japanese and Chinese. He was a visiting professor at Harvard, Duquesne, and Southern Methodist Universities. Honorary Degrees have been conferred upon him by Loyola University in Chicago, Edgecliff College, Rockford College, and Mount Mary College, as well as by universities in Brazil and Venezuela. He was a guest lecturer at universities throughout the world and made fifty-one lecture tours throughout the United States alone. He was President of the Austrian Medical Society of Psychotherapy.


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Frank on February 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is amazing that this man is not read with the same respect as Jung or Freud. His viewpoint is a view from a very unique point that needs to be considered if not revered by everyone.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michal on June 19, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's a book written by sciencist for sciencists about humanity and God, but even ordinary folks can get it meaning. Great stuff.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. Waterman on September 16, 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked this book even more that "Man's Search for Meaning." Its incredible that this was published in 1946, months after Frankl was liberated from a concentration camp. His writing is lucid and I think poignant where he elucidates the relationship between psychiatry and theology. There are some points I disagree with: I think he stresses that the divine, or numinous, bears no relation to the material and factual. I would argue that our sense of the divine, as well as conscience, are both products of the connections between our minds and our bodies and between individuals and their social surroundings. Interestingly, Frankl uses the example of the human navel, which symbolizes the connection between mother and child as a metaphor of transcendence, but fails to see in his use of this metaphor a potential reference to the actual sense of the numinous, as well as to conscience. Although his writing is open enough to allow for this possibility, he stops short of examining the full significance of the connection to the mother, the intrauterine environment in which consciousness first develops a sense of itself. There is a lot more to be said about this book and Frankl's contributions to our understanding of human behavior. In "Entheogens, Society & Law: Towards a Politics of Consciousness, Autonomy and Responsibility" Daniel Waterman and Casey William Hardison have explored the notion of response-ability implicit in this work in detail. See: http://www.amazon.com/dp/190864561X
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