Notes from Underground (Vintage Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Notes from Underground (Everyman's Library)
 
 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Notes from Underground (Vintage Classics) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Notes from Underground (Everyman's Library) [Hardcover]

Fyodor Dostoevsky , Richard Pevear , Larissa Volokhonsky
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)

List Price: $21.00
Price: $13.42 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $7.58 (36%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, Oct. 31? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $5.99  
Hardcover $13.42  
Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Book Description

March 23, 2004 9781400041916 978-1400041916

Dostoevsky’s most revolutionary novel, Notes from Underground marks the dividing line between nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, and between the visions of self each century embodied. One of the most remarkable characters in literature, the unnamed narrator is a former official who has defiantly withdrawn into an underground existence. In full retreat from society, he scrawls a passionate, obsessive, self-contradictory narrative that serves as a devastating attack on social utopianism and an assertion of man’s essentially irrational nature.

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, whose Dostoevsky translations have become the standard, give us a brilliantly faithful edition of this classic novel, conveying all the tragedy and tormented comedy of the original.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)


Frequently Bought Together

Notes from Underground (Everyman's Library) + The Idiot (Everyman's Library) + The Brothers Karamazov (Everyman's Library)
Price for all three: $49.69

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for previous translations by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, winners of the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize

The Brothers Karamazov
“One finally gets the musical whole of Dostoevsky’s original.” –New York Times Book Review

“It may well be that Dostoevsky’s [world], with all its resourceful energies of life and language, is only now–and through the medium of [this] new translation–beginning to come home to the English-speaking reader.” –New York Review of Books

Crime and Punishment
“The best [translation] currently available…An especially faithful re-creation…with a coiled-spring kinetic energy… Don’t miss it.” –Washington Post Book World

“Reaches as close to Dostoevsky’s Russian as is possible in English…The original’s force and frightening immediacy is captured…The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard version.” –Chicago Tribune

Demons
“The merit in this edition of Demons resides in the technical virtuosity of the translators…They capture the feverishly intense, personal explosions of activity and emotion that manifest themselves in Russian life.” –New York Times Book Review

“[Pevear and Volokhonsky] have managed to capture and differentiate the characters’ many voices…They come into their own when faced with Dostoevsky’s wonderfully quirky use of varied speech patterns…A capital job of restoration.” –Los Angeles Times

With an Introduction by Richard Pevear

From the Inside Flap

Dostoevsky?s most revolutionary novel, Notes from Underground marks the dividing line between 19th- and 20th- century fiction, and between the visions of self each century embodied. One of the most remarkable characters in literature, the unnamed narrator is a former official who has defiantly withdrawn into an underground existence. In full retreat from society, he scrawls a passionate, obsessive, self-contradictory narrative that serves as a devastating attack on social utopianism and an assertion of man?s essentially irrational nature.
Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, whose Dostoevsky translations have become the standard, give us a brilliantly faithful edition of this classic novel, conveying all the tragedy and tormented comedy of the original.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Everyman's Library (March 23, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781400041916
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400041916
  • ASIN: 1400041910
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #97,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
264 of 284 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More with the Mad Genius......... August 13, 2001
Format:Paperback
Quick read? I finished Crime and Punishment and thought I'd zip through Notes like a snack before going on to the Brothers Karamozov, afterall, it's barely over 100 pages. Quick read? Think again.
Imagine being locked in a very small room with a verbose, insane, brilliant, jaded, before-his-times, clerk-come-philosopher....with a wicked sense of humor, and a toothache that's lasted a month. Pleasant company....are you searching for the door yet?
For the first hour, he's going to rant about his philosophy of revenge, the pointlessness of his life, his superiority, his failure, oh yeah, and his tooth. FOr the second half of the book, he's going to tell you a tale, with the title "Apropos of the Wet Snow". Because of course, there's wet snow outside on the ground.
I will leave you with this encouragement. If you can get through this book, you will appreciate Doestoevsky more, understand Crime and Punishment better, and probably enjoy a good laugh more than once.
Notes from the Underground is not light reading, but it is well worth the effort. And the translation by Pevear, including the translators notes at the back, is excellent.
Was this review helpful to you?
112 of 120 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deep analysis of the human condition April 27, 2001
Format:Paperback
Notes From The Underground is Dostoevsky's grand look at the human condition from the perspective of a man living on the fringes of society. The short novel provides the key to much of the author's later and more fleshed out novels.
Presented in two parts the novel tells the story of the unnamed Undergound Man who is forced into a life of inaction by the reason driven society that he finds himself in.
Part I of the novel is a long monologue to an invisible audience which explains how the Underground Man came into existence. It is a masterpiece of Existentialist fiction and has been the cornerstone for many later writers including Freud and Camus. The ideas expressed in this part of the novel deal with the character's interactions with himself. This is also the mother of all anti-hero literature. Through the Underground Man's speech we identify him as an over sensitive man of great intellegence. We begin to identify with the character and understand him. While this part of the novel is idea laden it presents one of the great characters of modern fiction.
Part II of the novel is much more accessible to today's reader. This part of the novel deals with the Underground Man's interactions with the society around him. It is in this section that we see that he incapable of reacting in a normal way with the persons that he comes into contact with. He is not the rational man of Part I but a person driven to inaction by his own personal circumstances. He is spiteful, mean spirited and incapable of giving or receiving love to or from others.
On the whole this is a very important piece of world literature which deserves a very careful reading. The novel reads like an onion with each new chapter giving us deeper and deeper insight into the character. The modern reader may well grow tired of the writing style of the novel but if one has patience and reads carefully he will be rewarded.
Was this review helpful to you?
97 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Slime of His Time June 19, 2003
Format:Paperback
The first words of this deeply disturbing, but powerful, novel are "I am a sick man....I am a spiteful man." and these may refer equally to the main character and to the author. Dostoevsky has written an amazing portrait of a loner, whose introverted, sick thoughts spill out on the pages in demented brilliance. The novel is a product of European cynicism, nihilism, and inertia, all of which reached a certain height in the paralyzed upper circles of 19th century Russia. Nobody could write such a book without some personal acquaintance with the mean moods of this anti-hero. The main character, who does nothing except hide from the world, is a total misfit, a loser in life at home, at work, and in love---a jerk, a dweeb, a dork, a geek in modern American parlance---yet through Dostoyevsky's clear prose, we see into his wounded soul. "Actually, I hold no brief for suffering, nor am I arguing for well-being." he writes, "I argue for...my own whim and the assurance of my right to it, if need be." He is apart from society, recognizes no social obligation. He argues that suffering is still better than mere consciousness, because it sharpens the awareness of your being, therefore suffering is in man's interest Someone who can argue that is not going to write an average novel. This is in fact not an average novel at all, but a book concerned with the play of ideas, ideas that flash around like comets and meteorites inside Dostoevsky's head. It can no more escape Dostoevsky's brain than a Woody Allen movie can escape Woody Allen.
The plot line of NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND is extremely slim. It concerns an underground man, a man like a rat or a bug, who lives outside, or more likely, underneath the world's gaze.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Dostoevsky's Best December 15, 2002
Format:Paperback
First my confession: the first two encounters with this celebrated novella both ended with the book being rudely dismissed across the room near pg. 30. But ahh, the third reading felt positively as if a portable supernova had detonated between my two hands. My duty then as a reviewer is to tell you how you should approach this book and ultimately convince you to read it.
The most important thing you need to know about this book is that it is a POLEMICAL SATIRE. There is a great ideological distance between the narrator and Dostoevsky - in no way does he reflect the author's outlook. This fact is not obvious seeing that even his contemporaries were perplexed and generations of critics stymied. The opponent of Dostoevsky's polemic is the radical socialist Chernyshevsky, whose novel "What is to be Done?" (incidentally, Lenin's favorite novel) is parodied piecemeal throughout the novella. What the underground man represents is the logical extreme of a man who totally embraces Chernyshevsky's "rational egoism" and its socialist program. Chernyshevsky believed that once man is shown the truth through science and reason, the "new man" will inevitably renounce all irrational behavior. He also proposes that a new society be founded on socialist and materialistic principles, where the individual will is subjected for the betterment of humanity. In this book, Dostoyevsky seeks to undermine Chernyshevsky by showing that a strict adherence to this radical thought ends in a terrible cul de sac called the "man from underground". Where it diverges from being a mere satire is the fabulous and tortuous dialogue-monologue of this embittered man.
Although Chernyshevsky's overconfidence in science seems incredibly naïve to us now, this was certainly not the case in the 1860's.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great item, Great Seller
Published 1 month ago by Laura C. Yin
5.0 out of 5 stars like reading a letter written by a mentally ill person
I enjoyed reading this book. Surprisingly, I found the first part more fascinating in some way. He wrote so beautifully, so sincere, it has such powerful text. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Moriah
5.0 out of 5 stars Dostoevsky';s short but difficult novella ":Notes from Underground" is...
A few weeks ago I came to the last page of Pevear and Volokhonsky's excellent translation of Tolstoy';s peerless War and Peace. Read more
Published 2 months ago by C. M Mills
5.0 out of 5 stars Freewill Triumphing over Determinism
The memorable words “I am a sick man. I am a wicked man. I am an unattractive man” introduces us to the bitter and misanthropic narrator of Notes from the Underground. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Leonard Seet
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Existentialist Novel
Read this in conjunction with Crime and Punishment and Brothers K to get a well-rounded picture of Dostoevsky's view of humanity. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Jason L
5.0 out of 5 stars Important work by the master.
This book leads one in the direction of the later short stories like The Meek One and The Dream of a Ridiculous Man. The messages that the book conveys are disturbing. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Songplayerman
5.0 out of 5 stars "But reasoning explains nothing, and consequently there's no point in...
Notes from Underground begins Dostoevsky's long list of masterworks. In the form of the "Underground Man," we meet one of the great literary psyches of the Western tradition: a... Read more
Published 9 months ago by Lazar
5.0 out of 5 stars Short and bitter
It is a condensed work of great pathos and bitterness. Holden Caulfield seems like an Eagle Scout in comparison to Dostoevsky's brilliantly written anti-hero. Read more
Published 14 months ago by nskoulos
5.0 out of 5 stars An observant, yet sombering take on societal "progress"
Dostoevsky's novel is filled with satire as thick and fluid as the most tear-inducting onions. Divided into two parts, "The Underground" and "Apropos of the Wet Snow",he writes... Read more
Published 14 months ago by Jeff Commissaris
3.0 out of 5 stars A fair read.
I didn't find the quality of the writing and ability to hold my interest as good as Pushkin and Turgenev.
Published 17 months ago by marc
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category