Underground: The Julian Assange Story 2013 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(10) IMDb 6.8/10
Available in HD
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Focus World presents a thrilling biopic of WikiLeaks' Julian Assange and the country-wide manhunt to bring him to justice in the 1980s.

Starring:
Rachel Griffiths, Anthony LaPaglia
Runtime:
1 hour, 35 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Underground: The Julian Assange Story

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Robert Connolly
Starring Rachel Griffiths, Anthony LaPaglia
Supporting actors Alex Williams, Laura Wheelwright, Callan McAuliffe, Jordan Raskopoulos, Benedict Samuel, Ben Crundwell, Doug Bowles, Daniel Frederiksen, Ben Keller, Simon Maiden, Ian Bliss, Dean Cartmel, Nick Mitchell, Paul Dawber, Jeffery Richards, Maria Angelico, Silas James, Shane Nagle
Studio Focus Features
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

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Well written, great acting and kept ones attention.
Blossom
His entire life was devoted to helping innocent victims, women and children, avoid the death grip of the military.
Kati.Pea
The acting is outstanding, especially young Alex Williams.
JAL

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kati.Pea on November 23, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
A rare look at the unvarnished truth behind the sins of the military as captured by the hacking skills and computer genius of Julian Assange, a true hero. Think about it. Do you think he was guilty of anything other than trying to save lives and expose murderous acts? He didn't serve a day in jail because what he did was heroic, albeit against the law. His entire life was devoted to helping innocent victims, women and children, avoid the death grip of the military.

No, it was not the slickest movie, done in the normal Hollywood spectacular fashion, with big name stars and electrifying high tech hijinks. The story needed no slick treatment. It stands on its own without the patina of a Hollywoodesque treatment.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Mucciolo on November 4, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Well-done, and informative. Great cast and believable performances. I suggest watching the 2013 documentary "We Steal secrets" as a follow-up to this movie which focuses on Assange's work with WikiLeaks later in his career.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By California Dreaming on November 15, 2013
Format: DVD
I guess that the old saying, "Do as I say, not as I do," is an instance of the more formal "argumentum ad baculum" fallacy. Basically, it uses force to "prove" a point, but actually it proves nothing except that you're a parent, or a bully -- or worse yet, that you're a parent AND a bully, which is probably very common -- or you have nuclear weapons.

And the US has probably been guilty of all of these things for quite a while now, maybe outside of the "parent" part. What with intercepting Internet traffic and listening in on phone conversations from such people as Angela Merkel, the US certainly has some 'splainin' to do. After all, it surely wouldn't be a great idea to listen in on one of the leaders of a country that has been one of the greatest US allies, at least since "I Love Lucy" first appeared on TV.

And this is the psychological setup for the film "Underground;" at least it was for me. Julian Assange has been naturally demonized by at least the US government for quite awhile, but if you've been paying attention, when the US demonizes someone or something it means one of two things (this would be an "either/or fallacy" but you've been forewarned): you're really bad, or you're really good. Mr. Assange could probably be described as either one I suppose, depending upon one's perspective.

I have to admit that I am far from an expert on Mr. Assange myself. I've read a few articles here and there and followed the news. And now I've seen this film, which I'm assuming pushes some fact while it pushes some fiction. I surprisingly didn't know that he is originally from Australia, but I learned that from this film and verified it with a quick Internet check.
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Format: DVD
“Underground” is a film made for Australia’s Network Ten inspired by Suelette Dreyfus’ 1997 book “Underground: Hacking, Madness, and Obsession on the Electronic Frontier” that chronicled the exploits and subsequent arrests of elite computer hackers in Australia 1989-1991. Julian Assange, of WikiLeaks fame, was one of those hackers as well as a research assistant on the book. Renewed interest in Assange in the past couple of years was the motivation for a film about his teenaged hacking adventures. The film focuses on Assange’s group of friends who called themselves “The International Subversives”: fellow hacker Prime Suspect, master phreaker Trax, and Mendax, Assange's online identity at the time.

The story begins as Christine Assange (Rachel Griffiths) argues with her creepy boyfriend, then flees with son Julian and his younger brother. This will explain the family’s peripatetic lifestyle over the next few years. Next, Julian (Alex Williams) is in his late teens, unpacking a Commodore 64 computer in his family’s new home in Emerald, Victoria, a distant suburb of Melbourne. Some hackers have been arrested in the United States, but this doesn’t deter Julian’s ambitions or those of his friends Prime Suspect (Callan McAuliffe) and Trax (Jordan Raskopoulos). Julian, in particular, has set his sights on Milnet, the military network of the US Department of Defense, but a team of Australian Federal Police led by detective Ken Roberts (Anthony LaPaglia) intend to find him first.

Robert Connelly both wrote and directed “Underground”. It should be noted that the Subversives’ hacking exploits in the film are very different from in Dreyfus’ book and in reality. Assange’s personal life and that of his family are almost entirely fictionalized.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Blossom on February 7, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Well written, great acting and kept ones attention. It is a good story of a young Julian Assange and what drove him to be a truth seeker.
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