Understanding Chess Endgames and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$18.14
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $6.81 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.52
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Understanding Chess Endgames Paperback – August 25, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.14
$12.95 $13.41
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Understanding Chess Endgames + Understanding Chess Middlegames + John Nunn's Chess Course
Price for all three: $54.42

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Gambit Publications (August 25, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906454116
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906454111
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #377,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author


Dr John Nunn is one of the best-respected figures in world chess. He was among the world's leading grandmasters for nearly twenty years, winning four gold medals in chess Olympiads and finishing sixth overall in the World Cup in 1989. He is a much-acclaimed writer, whose works have won 'Book of the Year' awards in several countries. In 2004, 2007 and 2010 Nunn was crowned World Chess Solving Champion, ahead of many former champions.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
Clearly explained concepts, lots of examples.
David
This is one of the superb works by John Nunn, who I concider among the best chess writers.
Panu Laine
In fact, all levels of chess players could benefit from this book.
Jim Rickman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Derek Grimmell on October 16, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Howell's Essential Chess Endings: The Tournament Player's Guide was for many years the best single volume on the endgame for the club and tournament player. It's over $100 used now, and not a realistic choice for most. There are some one-volume endgame encyclopedias, comprehensive but hard to study. This book is the new standard one-volume endgame training program for players up to expert or master strength, and is remarkably accessible to even the lower ranks of scholastic or adult tournament players.

Nunn centers the book on 100 lessons for the endgame player, divided up by type of endgame: pawn endings, knight, bishops of same color, bishops of opposite color, bishop versus knight, rook versus rook or minor piece, and queens. The material is well-divided, with a quarter of the ideas devoted to the most common type of ending (rook endings) and 18 more devoted to the most critical of all, pure pawn endings. The selection of concepts is remarkably comprehensive. For example, he devotes 5 of his 100 lessons to the Lucena position and its relatives, but also includes the Vancura draw (which pops up surprisingly often in Rook endgames), the f & h pawn draw in Rook endings, and the relative merits of rooks behind and before passed pawns. He gives examples of the power of a rook on the seventh, covers several tactical tricks in rook endings, and touches on the basics of handling positions with 4 v 3 pawns all on the same side.

Even more, this book is a preparatory volume for Nunn's two-volume series,
...Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Panu Laine on December 13, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the superb works by John Nunn, who I concider among the best chess writers. His ability to dig up the essential and explain it understandably and in an interesting way is just fantastic. What more could you expect from a book?
The subject here is one of those "boring endgames", which are in a way difficult to study from the reference works. On top of that the reference works typically doesn't have a hint of pegagogical touch. John Nunn is able to turn this upside down. The selected endgames are absolutely essential for a development for a chess player. They are EXPLAINED - not only referred. The entirety is logical and written in good style. Strongly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
46 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Jim Rickman on September 29, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In this book, English GM John Nunn reviews 100 of the most important chess ideas and provides four examples for each of them, discussing the positions and how best to proceed. There's a lot of chess wisdom here which, if studied, will become part of your arsenal when playing competitive chess. John Nunn has the ability to explain things, even complex concepts, in a manner that is clear and simple to understand. I wish there had been such a book when I first fell in love with the game of chess and only had Reuben Fine's "Basic Chess Endings", a magnificent reference work which is difficult to take in when you're trying to learn chess endings from the ground up. Nunn's book makes the study of chess endgames enjoyable with his many examples. Most are drawn from current praxis but there are many examples from the last 150 years of masterly play. In fact, all levels of chess players could benefit from this book.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Deaf Zed on April 6, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
BACKGROUND: When I originally got this (2.5 years ago), I had only really been playing (a lot of) correspondence chess. I wasn't as serious of a player then, and at the time, I was merely looking for a book to give me some endgame pointers. As I had practically no chess literature experience then, I primarily got this on Nunn's authoring reputation alone.

I'm now playing in USCF-rated tournaments and currently have a (still provisional) rating in the 2000s. Read around 20 chess books and have half-finished dozens of others. And I've now had considerable experience playing speed chess, first with some weaker club players, and eventually stronger ones.
With time and experience, my opinion of this book has changed somewhat (for the worse).

REVIEW: The book is designed to be an introduction to endgame basics. Hence, there's more breadth than depth of coverage: 100 endgame themes, each covering about 4 examples (some more, some less). Most important themes appear to be covered. Notable exceptions are some basic mating methods (King + Queen vs. King, King + Rook vs. King, King + 2 Bishops vs. King) and some rarer cases like 3 Minor Pieces vs. Queen scenarios.
Each chapter starts with a 1-2 page summary of the important points discussed within.

Mind you, for a book on endgame "basics", there are still quite a few technical details, especially if you're not used to endgame literature. But you'll undoubtedly come away having learned a lot.

I learned, for example:
1.) king + rook pawn vs. king is always a draw if the defending king can reach the queening square before the pawn.
2.) it's usually better to have isolated, widely separated passed pawns in an opposite-color bishop endgame than it is to have connected passed pawns.
3.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?