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Understanding the Digital Generation: Teaching and Learning in the New Digital Landscape (21st Century Fluency) Paperback – January 31, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: 21st Century Fluency
  • Paperback: 174 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (January 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449585590
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449585594
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.4 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #275,458 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ian Jukes has been a teacher, an administrator, writer, consultant, university instructor, and keynote speaker. He is the president of the InfoSavvy Group, an international consulting group that provides leadership and program development in the areas of assessment and evaluation, strategic alignment, curriculum design and publication, professional development, planning, change management, hardware and software acquisition, information services, customized research, media services, and online training as well as conference keynotes and workshop presentations. Over the past 10 years, Jukes has worked with clients in more than 40 countries and made more than 7,000 presentations. His Committed Sardine Blog is read by more than 100,000 people in 80 countries.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Phillip A. Towndrow on September 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In my estimation and experience, the use of digital tools and new media in education disrupts the status quo precisely at the point where the disturbance caused outstrips practitioners' understanding, patience and expected levels of control. The contemporary teacher's lament, "I want my students to listen to me but their use of digital technology takes that away" indicates--if nothing else--a pedagogical bleakness requiring urgent remediation. But why? And what can be done by teachers acting individually or in unison?

In "Understanding the digital generation: Teaching and learning in the new digital landscape" (Corwin, 2010) authors Jukes, McCain and Crockett attempt to make the conceptual case for changing current instructional practices in schools given the unprecedented and unrelenting developments surrounding the so-called "digital generation". The argument put forward is in two parts and, in my opinion, relies on the reader's acceptance of a series of popular and rarely questioned sentiments and notions about schooling, worklife and digital technology use.

Part I rehearses a familiar, multifaceted set of concerns that is easily summarised. There is a growing gap between the life experience of kids today and, their parents and teachers. Today's children take access to digital tools and media for granted; they expect, want, and need interactive information. Further, the digital world is changing the way these kids see and think--they have developed "hypertext" and "hyperlinked" minds that are easily and incredibly bored by most of today's education. The upshot? As today's learners sit impatiently unengaged or under engaged in teacher-centric, analogue classrooms, education is suffering a crisis of relevance.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Texas Teacher on April 21, 2013
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I'd recommend this for any educator who is baffled why the most recent batch of students seems to not be learning the way they used to. This book does NOT say that children have no need to read or learn science or learn history. It says the opposite. All of tho subjects are still in great need, but how we present that information to the students is critical.

The reason for 4 stars is for two reasons 1. Using terms from a previous book without explaining them 2. Taking too long in the first few chapters to get to the point.

Throughout the Book they use the term "hyperlinked information" without giving a good explanation or example of what they meant by it. I can only assume it's from the previous book in the series "Living on the Future Edge." Similarly I think that many practical techniques are left for the following books "The Digital Diet" and "Teaching for Tomorrow."

Second, much of the introduction seemed tone repetitive and I just wanted to scream "stop saying teachers like me don't know the benefit of digital learning and just tell me the benefit!"

And some final food for thought: They say video games build problem solving and perseverance, but what about cheat codes? Many of my students would either give up or look for some way to cheat their way around a difficult problem. They also don't mention economically disadvantaged students. Is there research on whether or not they are also picking up these modes of thinking even though they havenot been exposed to the same kind of technology?

Overall a good book with a fresh perspective.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JacVital on April 17, 2012
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The book shares great points of view worthy of discussing, but repeats its point over and over. The kindle version has minor erros, but they don't compromise the comprehension.
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By William Chou on June 23, 2014
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It gives me a realistic view about the millennials and why they act the way they do in and out of classroom.
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This book opens one's eyes to the learning behaviors of the current generation of "digital natives" and how to best address their needs as educators.
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