Customer Reviews


20 Reviews
5 star:
 (17)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic
"Understanding Unix/Linux Programming" takes an interesting approach trying to show the principles of Unix programming, it analyses the shell commands using three steps:
I. use the command
II. find information about the command
III. create the command using C language and the standard library
Thus, it doesn't only teach Unix/Linux...
Published on December 30, 2002 by Christos Karayiannis

versus
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Its not for Unix users/developers ..its for people who want to create Unix command
I choose this books as it was from Harvard professor and though some new insights on learning unic will be gained. This book has given a new approach in terms of learning unic by seeing what actual C code is wriiten behind every command . This book is for people who are highly skilled in UNix and C . Also for users who want to create new command by programming in C
Published 17 months ago by Himanshu mohan


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, December 30, 2002
By 
Christos Karayiannis (3o TEE Karditsas, GREECE) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
"Understanding Unix/Linux Programming" takes an interesting approach trying to show the principles of Unix programming, it analyses the shell commands using three steps:
I. use the command
II. find information about the command
III. create the command using C language and the standard library
Thus, it doesn't only teach Unix/Linux programming it presents a way of thinking and solving a problem using the available information someone can obtain from man pages.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding introduction to Unix systems programming, August 19, 2008
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
I bought this book as a quick introduction to the world of UNIX/Linux systems programming. Having had extensive prior experience with the C programming language and application development on other platforms (DOS, OS/2, AS/400), I read the book without actually trying out the sample code or programming exercises. My goal was to get a solid feel for the basic concepts of Unix systems programming as quickly as possible, in order to move on to more advanced Linux topics (assembly programming, kernel and device driver development, implementation of the Linux TCP/IP stack) covered in other books. I found this book to be exceptionally clear and well written and ideally suited for the purpose.

The book requires intermediate knowledge of C and some basic computing skills, but otherwise makes very few assumptions about the reader. Concepts are introduced gradually, and the exceptionally clear diagrams, analogies, case studies and sample programs make each chapter a pleasure to digest and learn from. In order to avoid overwhelming the reader, advanced details are moved out of the main flow of the text, and into the exercises at the end of each chapter.

Each chapter is structured in a similar manner. A small programming project is introduced as the goal of each chapter. Each is appropriately chosen so that the systems programming concepts that are to be the subject of the chapter are key to the solution. The author then guides the reader along the path by asking and answering the questions "What does it do?", "How does it work?", and "How can I write my own version?". The author has a knack for anticipating the types of questions that are likely to be in the reader's mind at the appropriate moments, and helps the reader along with helpful pointers and analogies. This approach is very effective, and while not as detailed and complete as that of W. Richard Stevens (Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment), it is certainly more readable and easier to digest.

Overall, an exceptional introduction to Unix/Linux systems programming and highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent course through Unix and Linux with copious code and examples., October 28, 2005
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
Unix has had the luxury of being one of the most documented operating systems in history. Many books have been dedicated to documenting the internals of Unix and Unix-like systems and some have risen to the ranks of classic texts regarded by all as necessary to understanding the inner workings of Unix. Understanding Unix®/Linux Programming would be in excellent company with these books. The book contains a copious amount of code and clear, diagramed explanations describing the processes transpiring in the machine.

Understanding Unix®/Linux Programming is designed to be used in an operating systems course with programmers fluent in C. Fortunately, though, the book can be used outside of the classroom if the reader does not mind an occasional open-ended questions with no included answers. The book may seem light on pages (530 including index), but the author should get an award for jamming so much useful explanation and helpful (and complete) code. The format of each chapter is familiar to most textbooks, with an introduction to the task at hand, explanations and examples, a summary, a list of explorations to further understand the topics presented, and a set of programming exercises. The exercises are creative and directly relate to the presented code. They're also (dare I say it?) fun. I'm not saying they'll replace crossword puzzles, but they do present creative or obvious challenges to the reader. (Like handling when a user types 'exit' from a shell, or blinking the text in an ncurses application).

The book includes topics on file I/O, device I/O, timers, process management, stream and datagram sockets, POSIX threads, file systems, the terminal driver, signals pipes, network programming and semaphores. A typical chapter will introduce an operating system concept (file systems and directories, for instance) and will briefly describe the current Unix command for working with that concept (pwd for determining the present working directory, or ls for listing the contents of a directory, and so forth). The author then proceeds to give a detailed description of what the operating system does to run the command. In the chapter on processes and programs, the author describes what processes are and how to use the ps command. Next the author describes how to fork child processes, and wait for them. This leads to the 'prompting shell', which is a simple, yet functional shell environment. Now some books would leave this exercise after creating a semi-functional shell, but the author presses on and in the next chapter creates 'small-shell' which is an interactive shell with a minimal scripting langauge and variable support. All of this in the span of 71 pages, with plenty of examples, full code listings, diagrams, and problem sets.

Understanding Unix®/Linux Programming takes advantage of the inquisitive nature of coders by presenting commands and command squences we all take for granted, and turning them into "how do they work" learning experiences. Anyone who has ever stopped to think why certain things work the way they do in Unix (or work at all) will find this book immensely helpful in sating that curiousity. Students who are assigned this textbook for a class should thank their teacher for choosing a genuinely useful text from which to read. I can't help but be jealous of students who will use this book for their classes. That jealousy is short-lived though, as anyone who wants an excellent resource for learning Unix programming will benefit from picking up this book. Kudos to the author for crafting not only an exceptionally easy to read and thourough book, but for taking the complex machinations of Unix and making them simple and accessible for all coders.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maybe the best book on *nix system programming, January 8, 2011
By 
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
This is an amazing book perhaps exceeding in value the canonical Steven's tomb Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series). What makes this book stand out among the rest is in its method of learning the system calls that form the api of unix programming. While other books tend to present the material by logically listing the various system calls by function. This book introduces the same apis by taking a well know unix command (like ls or cat) and then developing a working implementation from scratch. So, for cat, as an example, it first analyzes what cat does, designs a solution using the available apis ( which it shows you how to get by utilizing the manual pages), provides graphical representations of a working implementation, and then provides a fully coded example. This is a unique method of teaching that I have yet to find in any other systems programming book, including the most famous ones. The material is extremely easy to follow, even for a beginner I would say, actually making a rather dry subject interesting and compelling. Therefore you will find that you did not need to force yourself to become engaged in the material as you need to do with most technical books.

If you go through this book you will come away with an understanding of how the unix/linux kernel works and will have thoroughly enjoyed the experience!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introduction to Unix System Programming, December 31, 2002
By 
Amazon Customer "pcbme" (Westford, MA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
This is the best Unix system programming book I've ever read. Some other books also cover the topic well, but they are more like manuals. This one is definitely more readable and explains how things works more clearly.
Although it's not cheap, I feel this book worth those $$.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book is as excellent as class, May 4, 2003
By 
qiang wu (San Gabriel, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
There are lots of Unix books, but this is the first one combining practical training with foundational Unix programming theory consistently.
I happen to be enrolled in Prof. Molay 's Unix Programming class when this wonderful book was published in Jannary. The book covers all of class's material plus couple of chapters for the reading. Prof Molay brings the fundamentals of Unix Programming to a new light. His clear presentation helps us to master the material in an efficient way.
The book is suitable for students both at beginning and professional levels. Besides, the CSCIE 215 (Unix Programming) class offered by Harvard Extension School has online option for people working full time. Online registration is as easy as 1-2-3.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars University Text, May 16, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
This University text introduces system programming via Unix/Linux in a way that stimulates students to ask "How is that done?" and then make it happen. The unique approach is good. Far too many would-be programmers are handed a recipe and expect the same on the job. Those who ask "How is that done?" will later ask "How can this be done?" without the example program to inspire them. It's a good way to approach teaching students system programming at the novice level.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book is as excellent as class, May 4, 2003
By 
qiang wu (San Gabriel, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
There are many Unix books, but this is the first one combining the practical training with fundamental theory in a consistent way.
I happened to be enrolled in his class when this wonderful book was published in Jan 2003. Prof Molay brings the fundamentals of Unix Programming to a new light. His clear presentation helps us understand the theory of Unix programming in an efficient way.
The book is suitable for students both at beginning and professional levels. Good C experiences preferred. Also the class offered each spring term has distance study option for those who have full time job.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT, September 25, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
Excellent book to understand the basics of UNIX/Linux system programming. The author makes no assumptions about your knowledge level and walks you through the topics slowly. The book doesnt' go too deep into threads, but that's a deep topic which deserves a book on its own. The code samples work, too. Bruce Molay wrote an excellent book!!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book on signals, June 1, 2003
By 
xliu (San Bernardino, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice (Paperback)
I have been looking for a book that went into details with signals and sockets. This has me a lot in my job and the book
has solved my programming problems in many ways. I hope many can make use of this book because I have. I definitely recommend this book for beginner on Unix programming. It has many good examples to follow.
Take the time to read this book. It is very resourceful and will give you a very good understanding of the Unix Kernel and Commands.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Understanding UNIX/LINUX  Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice
Understanding UNIX/LINUX Programming: A Guide to Theory and Practice by Bruce Molay (Paperback - December 5, 2002)
$135.40 $111.48
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.