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Undesired Princess and the Enchanted Bunny Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1990


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Baen (April 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671698753
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671698751
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,728,725 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 21, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book consists of two unrelated piece of fiction written by two individual authors. L. Sprague de Camp's The Undesired Princess is your typical de Camp fantasy featuring a practical man thrust into a fantasy realm where magic is very real and unearthly dangers threaten not only the protagonist and the leaders of the realm but, indirectly, the very existence of the fantasy world itself. Rollin Hobart is an exceedingly logical engineer who is recruited (or kidnapped, really) by a strange old man to save the life of his home land's princess. The successful hero can only succeed by answering a riddle posted by an elephantine behemoth. Pointing out false logic is rather a passion of Rollin's, but returning back home to New York poses a much harder problem than saving the royal damsel in distress. Finding himself welcomed into the royal family as the soon-to-be husband to the princess, Rollin goes to great extremes, often using his own form of magic, to find a portal back to his world, but to his dismay he only finds himself acquiring more and more authority and power. This fantasy world is most interesting in that it is a two-value world, meaning that something either is or it isn't. Thus, there is no dusk-night immediately follows day instantaneously, for example. Statements are taken literally (as Rollin discovers after making the statement that he was hungry enough to eat a horse). The method of warfare is especially fascinating. A fair fight involves both armies lining up in equal numbers; when either army gets out of formation in the slightest degree, their logic demands that the minutely disorganized army turn and run. I can't say that The Undesired Princess is as enjoyable as de Camp's Harold Shea stories, but it is certainly an interesting and amusing read.Read more ›
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Boffin on October 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was a perfect book for vacation time, lunchbreaks, and deserted beaches. I enjoyed the adventures of poor Rollin "The Logical" in the first part and Joe's predicament in the second half. I'm not one for fantasy or such, but I'm glad I got my hands on this book. Again, save it for your lighter moments.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mvargus on August 18, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stories of extraordinary men who go on quests are common, but the two short stories that appear in this compliation are both about rather mundane businessmen who find themselves in impossible worlds and given seemingly impossible quests.

These stories abound in humor, warmth and romance as the heroes stumble their way about in a world the clearly don't quite understand.

The first story by L. Sprague de Camp is the better of the two with the world itself being an impossible land of two-sided logic where everything much either be one thing or another. Hair can be red or not red. Mountains are yellow. There is no brown or green. Children grow up overnight as one can either be a child, or an adult, but not both. The people of the land reflect this and slowly drive the hero crazy with their ability to interpret any comment or command literally.

The second story by David Drake isn't quite as imaginative, but the intrigue does add an element to the story and the characters are vibrant and alive despite the short length of hte tale.

This is an excellent read for any lover of humor and fantasy.
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