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Unearthing Ancient America: The Lost Sagas of Conquerors, Castaways, and Scoundrels Paperback – October 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 287 pages
  • Publisher: New Page Books; 1 edition (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 160163031X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1601630315
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #218,575 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Frank Joseph became the editor-in-chief of Ancient American magazine when it was founded in 1993. His 20 books, which have been published in various languages throughout the world, include The Atlantis Encyclopedia, Discovering the Mysteries of Ancient America, and Opening the Ark of the Covenant. A frequent radio talk-show guest, he has been interviewed by Shirley MacLaine, Art Bell, Jeff Rense, Rob McConnell, and numerous other broadcast hosts. His lecture appearances include presentations throughout Japan and Britain, including conventions and seminars with the Association for Research and Enlightenment (the Edgar Cayce organization). Joseph lives in Wisconsin with his wife and son.

More About the Author

Frank Joseph has been the editor-in-chief of "Ancient American" magazine since its debut in 1993. He is the author of twenty books about prehistory re-published in as many foreign languages, including "The Atlantis Encyclopedia", "Opening the Ark of the Covenant", and "Unearthing Ancient America". Joseph is a frequent guest speaker at various metaphysical and archaeological societies in the U.S. and abroad.

Customer Reviews

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Good walk through some incidents you never heard about.
Daniel
He frequently expresses his frustration over not being taken seriously by the establishment.
M. L Lamendola
If you like to read about ancient history this is the book.
Cammie M. Royce

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 58 people found the following review helpful By David Roy on March 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
Included in "Unearthing Ancient America" are 37 articles ranging from Roman coins found off the coast of New Jersey to Vikings in Minnesota and Templars in Newfoundland. The articles themselves are very interesting, resulting in a good read for anybody who has an interest in ancient America. That's assuming they're not one of the "censors" keeping all of this information from the general public, of course!

The book is divided into a series of chapters, from Ancient Artifacts to Subterranean Mysteries and Underwater Discoveries. The subject matter is quite varied, with a couple of articles on copper-trading barons in the Great Lakes area, a Crystal Pyramid of Wisconsin's Rock Lake and various figurines and artifacts found either underwater or in deep caves in the Midwest. Thus, the reader never gets bored with one subject as the next article could be on something quite different (occasionally, there is a follow-up or supplementary article following the first one). For those who have only read, or are only familiar with the popular history of the country, most of these articles are quite intriguing, even as some offer more evidence for their theories than others.

Occasionally, the author of an article goes "way out there" and comes to some wild conclusions, but thankfully that's not very often. Most of the articles are interesting in their own way, all of them are short, but occasionally there is one that takes forever to wade through as the authors spend so much time detailing every little bit of their discovery and theories that they forget to actually make it interesting to the reader (with the exception of the small subset of people who might be as fascinated as they are with what they found).

Still, "Unearthing Ancient America" has a lot to recommend it.
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45 of 57 people found the following review helpful By M. Heiss on May 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an unfootnoted, undocumented, unskeptical retelling of every rumor associated with ...

Stop. I'll begin again.

There are many reasons to accept that America had thriving connections and intercontinental trading partners well before the European voyages of discovery began -- and that these connections were largely with Asia.

This book does not offer any information on current research in any field. It accepts conspiracy theories as to the disappearance of critical evidence, it does not publish photographs for visual reference, and far too many of the accounts are "being kept confidential to protect the identities and/or the locations of the discoveries". The is akin to Penthouse Forum for antiquity hunters (without the alluring women, of course) -- you know, the stories begin: "I was trespassing that day, and I found something I'll never forget. I didn't take a photograph or make any kind of record of my findings, and now those findings have mysteriously vanished. But I'll always rememebr..."

My copy is going in the trash can.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By M. L Lamendola VINE VOICE on September 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book presents an interesting take on the prehistory (history before records were kept) of the Americas. It's a compilation of articles by various authors (including Frank Joseph). Frank Joseph's underlying justification for this book is that establishment archaeologists and historians do not accept anything other than "Columbus was the first European in America."

In my (rarely, if ever, humble) opinion, what opens the door to the premise that Europeans were in the Americas millennia ago is the period known as the Dark Ages. The Catholic Empire (commonly misnamed the Catholic "Church") plunged Europe into about 1,000 years of extreme ignorance, superstition, and stupidity. For a large part of this era, literacy was punishable by death--that's an indication of how serious they were about this. When the Empire clamped down on reason and curiosity, it destroyed people and records it considered heretical to its dogma or threatening to its power. So, not only was a great deal of progress lost but so was a great deal of information.

The various authors provide intriguing circumstantial evidence supporting their position, but their conclusions tend to arise from conjecture rather than logical construction. This doesn't mean they are wrong. It does mean they haven't made their case by the standards of, say, formal debate. I was struck by two other things, the first of which is a lack of physical artifacts. The ones referenced are nearly all held by private owners or are lost somewhere.

Now when I say artifacts, I'm speaking of things like the tools these authors claim to have found and the large coffins they claim somebody found. Where are these? The book contains photographs of a few items, so that helps.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By einiespal on January 7, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good info but poorly presented. It lacks good photos. There are much better books on this subject than this one.
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17 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Augustin on November 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
I've always been a believer that history is written by the side that wins. So why then does the evidence supporting many advanced, sea-fairing people, visiting America long before Columbus get dismissed by our scientific and historic communities? Uncovering Ancient America covered a wide range of cases that included underwater pyramids, found on lake bottoms in North America to forgotten civilizations deep in the jungles of South America. I truly enjoyed both the style of writing and the subject matter itself. If you're the type of person who doesn't believe the convenient version of history taught in our history books, then this is an excellent book to read.
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