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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on November 13, 2005
These photojournalists took life threatening risks to connect to the people in Iraq. Unlike the media photographs that we are accustomed to, this book shows heartbreaking scenes of the way that this war has shattered the life, the relationships, the culture, and future of innocent civilians. The truth unembedded...

The book depicts not only scenes of the destruction of war, but also the struggle for life that exists in stark contrast to the shadow of day to day violence in Iraq.

These are the photojournalists who were able to make it into the Imam Ali Shrine during the siege of the old city. They determined that contrary to media reports there were no weapons being stored in the shrine.

"We crossed the lines because we believe that it is more important to humanize a conflict than it is to trade in rhetorical truths... Instead, we wanted to document honestly what we witnessed in the war because this is the sole duty of journalists, regardless of their nationality and religion. We were able to do this precisely because we did not carry weapons or claim allegiance to one of the warring parties. If our journeys from behind the lines were acts of faith, then they were also proof that often when one man is confronted with the humanity of another, he will not raise his rifle and pull the trigger. This is not disloyalty to one's country. It is the thing that brings an end to war."
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on November 23, 2005
"Unembedded" returns all the emotions to a conflict which has largely been reported from a safe distance. These four photographers bring you into Iraqi neighbourhoods, hospitals and homes to show the devastating short and longer-term effects of "surgical strikes". If you want to get a sense of what war really means for men, women and children, turn off the T.V. and spend some time with the people in these photographs.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on November 21, 2005
This is a stunning collection of photos by journalists who were somehow able to get shots that many mainstream journalists were unable to capture. The topics range from poignant to mundane to shocking and gory. The overall effect is to give important insights on Iraq and US engagement there.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on November 21, 2005
I'll fess up from the get-go and tell you I'm the brother of one of the photojournalists, Thorne Andeson. Perhaps this disqualifies me as an objective reviewer of the book, even though I think Unembedded is honest and its viewpoint is candid and fresh. Indulge me for a review Thorne's character instead. He is a truth-teller with a passion for justice. He is not willing to close his eyes or shutter his camera when it comes to seeing what needs to be seen, even when the view is not what others are hoping to see. I do not like to get upset, but this book is appropriately upsetting. I hope many eyes will see these photos and read the essays because they will be seeing Iraq through eyes that have gone to places and among people neglected by much of the American media. I'm not critizing the media, because safety and access have been difficult issues, but simply commending the honesty and bravery of those who now can widen our view.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 9, 2006
It shows the heart and soul of Iraqis. It shows what they are going through during the US invasion and occupation. Though shot by mostly US photographers, it shows from the Iraqi standpoint. Some of the pictures are disturbing but after all it is the depiction of war and WAR is not a pretty site.

Kudos to the worthy photographers who put their life in danger to show the whole world an unembedded story.

I salute you guys!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 12, 2006
This is an important book. So little has been disclosed about the terrible damage that Iraq has suffered with the sanctions and two wars. The heroic and talented photography in this well published book is valuable information for anyone who is interested in the harsh reality of the situation that ordinary people in Iraq face today
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on October 7, 2006
I just saw this book featured on the PBS show "AIR." It showcased many of the images from the book. Only the most heartless could fail to feel compassion and awe for the people depicted here and the brave photographers who did the work. I cannot accept the remark that the photos are somehow from Saddam's "point of view." They are a facet of the reality, a facet which we as Americans must confront, sooner or later, because it is our government that has set this chain of events in motion.

Ms. Bergin, please, if your idea of fighting for freedom is to deny the truth of suffering, at least have the integrity to spell "freedom" correctly.
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I saw the exhibit of this work at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. It is impossible for me to forget the atrocities our country perpetrated during the Iraq War. The war was a lie, an over-reaction, whatever, but there was simply no case to invade Iraq. So many Americans think of war as some far-off movie or video game, where they can watch the results from the comfort of their living room TV. I was disgusted that Bush got re-elected, and depressed. It was a testament to how this country has been dumb-downed by the likes of Fox News and all the major media. The atrocities in Iraq so far outweigh the mass-murders in this country like Newtown, Auburn, and now the Boston Marathon. When something like those events happen here, there is an outpouring of sympathy and grief. For some reason, Iraqis just weren't human beings like we are, and it was ok to bomb them and kill them, for no reason. Almost 200,000 civilian deaths. Somehow we shrug it off, it makes me ill. Buy this book, just look at the pictures, and if you voted for Bush in 2004, I hope your conscience reacts in some small way.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on May 7, 2006
Truly great work. The world needs people like these guys to

give us an in-depth view of what's inherently wrong with war. We

never have known what the other side suffers. Until now. Even the

'enemy' is human and the pain and suffering of is there to be seen in the

brows and creases in the faces of those men, women and children.

Keep on the good work and kudos.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2013
Seems like a very liberal book. I did not appreciate this biik. I love my country and all our military forces.
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