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Unfinished Journey: A World War II Remembrance Hardcover – January 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press (January 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592287611
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592287611
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,276,877 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Morris Redmann was an exceptional young man. He graduated from college at the age of eighteen and had begun law school when his country called him to war. The year was 1943. Morris did not hesitate. From his first day of training at Camp Beauregard, Louisiana, to the frontlines in France, he sent letters home without fail. These letters, from a young infantryman in the 94th division, are a daily account of the rigors of training and of life in battle during Europe's harshest winter in fifty years. Morris was a prolific and brilliant letter-writer. His intelligence and integrity shine on every page. Through these letters, Morris lives on as a beacon of faith and courage.
Morris's young life was filled with promise, but this promise was not to be fulfilled. His last letter to his parents was written in January 1945. During the Battle of the Bulge, a German artillery shell struck and killed him instantly. He was nineteen years old.
Morris had grown up in a large, devoted family in New Orleans. He was the beloved oldest child of ten. His letters were meticulously kept in shoeboxes and stowed away in the attic. Upon his parents' deaths, Kerry Redmann, one of Morris's younger brothers, became the keeper of these letters.
Kerry, with the encouragement of esteemed historian Stephen Ambrose, compiled Morris's letters into a volume that is both a testimony to one man's trials of war and a memorial for all the brave soldiers who have lost their lives for their country.
Morris Redmann is buried in the Luxembourg American Military Cemetery at Hamm, Luxembourg. However, his life will not be lost to the annals of time. His letters survived when the soldier did not. His Unfinished Journey will now be traveled by all readers of this fascinating historical record and will continue to enlighten for generations to come.

About the Author

Kerry Redmann is one of Morris B. Redmann Jr.'s eight younger brothers. The book's original purpose was for the enlightenment of two of Morris's youngest brothers, who--at ages three and four years, respectively--did not understand the significance of his absence from home. The author was fourteen years old when Morris left for the military; he now lives in Covington, Louisiana.

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Customer Reviews

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Morris B. Redmann, Jr. was the eldest of 10 children.
Kirk Redmann
Every student should read this book, about a generation of men who truly sacrificed for what we have today.
JB
Anyone enjoying reading memoirs of veterans from WWII will find this work compelling.
Ronald Drez

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Drez on July 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Anyone enjoying reading memoirs of veterans from WWII will find this work compelling. The only difference is this is a memoir from the grave - the thoughts, actions, hopes and dreams of a very young man who died at nineteen in the frozen Ardennes in 1945. He was in law school at eighteen. I had the pleasure to write the forward for this work, and Morris Redmann was indeed special: faithful, humorous, poetic, and patriotic; a man we would all have loved to have known. He left us his letters to do just that.

Ronald J. Drez
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on August 7, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I throughly enjoyed this book. I gave copies to several friends who also enjoyed it. Through his letters home, it is obvious that Morris Redmann was an exceptional young man. I felt that I got to know him through these letters. Beautifully put together.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Root of the square on September 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A real life look into a young American GI in World War II. If this doesn't put a lump in your throat I'm not sure what will.

I found it absolutely fascinating to follow this young man's journey through the war and I only wish that he had lived to enjoy what surely would have been a bright and full life.

If you're a fan of War literature at all, then this is a must for you.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Every student should read this book, about a generation of men who truly sacrificed
for what we have today. Morris Redman, like my own dad, was pulled from
graduate school to serve as infantry privates with the 94th division in General
Patton's 3rd Army. The 94th functioned mostly without tank or air support,
attacking heavily defended positions across rivers, steep bluffs, hedgerows,
underground fortifications, and lots of barbwire. My dad came home, Morris Redman
did not. But every soldier who endured what these men did lost a huge part of their life.
Every day is a memory of their buddies lost, including Morris Redman, mostly citizen
soldiers serving with gallantry and honor. What Redman and his colleagues gave up for
this nation is more than even this book can say, but my dad, having been in the same
graduate program and ending up as a private in the same division, can testify to the
accuracy of Redman's notes and experience. Redman' writings brought back a lot of
memories for him. Most of the combat was October 1944 through April 1945.
Their rifle companies had huge turnover each month between dead, injured, combat
fatigue, and non-enemy injuries. Zero degree in freezing trenches didn't help.
Redman's writing is a window on a time that he and others knew were setting a course
for our future. He, like his infantry buddies, faced not only the risk of physical death
but death of their former dreams as well. Morris Redman has left us with a lot to think
about. The life of a foot soldier, seen through his words, should spur us to not forget
what was done for us by these men. Rather than put future generations in debt. should
not we, as they did, put future generations on our back and protect the nation from
enemies internal and external.
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