Unhappy with Breaking Dawn? Don't burn it--RETURN it!


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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:49:44 AM PDT
She told us off, huh? Wow, I feel so ashamed.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:51:54 AM PDT
Elinor says:
Yeah I feel so ashamed I just may use Breaking Dawn as toilet paper instead.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:52:20 AM PDT
Aila Yeatts says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:53:15 AM PDT
Aila Yeatts says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:53:57 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 22, 2008 2:48:10 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:55:07 AM PDT
Elinor says:
See if I returned it to the bookstore it's not that I wouldn't be completely ruining them, I'd obviously use the money to buy something else so I don't see the big deal. As long as the book is in good condition.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:58:48 AM PDT
S. Serena says:
If people took your post to heart and never stepped into a bookstore again, you would be out of a job. Think about this before going on a vitrolic rant, m'kay?

People are irate not only with the story line but with the tripe that Little Brown put out there. Little Brown promises a quality product in terms of editing, cohesion, etc and it was just not evident in this book. Consumerism runs the world- if people continuously purchase subpar products, where is the stopping point? When do consumers say "enough is enough"? Prices are soaring on everything right now- book prices have gone up to $8.00 per paperback... if I'm paying $10.00 (after taxes, etc) for an hour's entertainment, I want quality publishing, quality editing and quality reading.

Do not assume that you have the right to castigate people for being unhappy consumers. I wasn't thrilled with all of the story line, nor was I thrilled with the manner within which the story line was executed- I didn't write it. But a well-known publisher setting these books out should have done a much, much better job before publishing this.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 8:15:14 AM PDT
Also as a long-time bookworm and as a bookstore employee (since we're throwing credentials around) I have to say: please stop flaunting either of these facts when you rant at people for returning a book. It makes the rest of us look bad.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:02:03 AM PDT
Willowisp says:
I can see Aila Yeatts point. However, I can see it the other way, too.

My first reaction is, "if I buy The Great Gatsby and don't like it would it be morally acceptable to return the book to the bookstore?" Of course not. I bought the book knowing that it may not be the best story ever, it may not live up to my expectations, etc. There's no rule anywhere that all books must meet all expectations or they ought to be returned. A book that fully satisfies me may be an absolute bore to someone else but that doesn't mean that the other person ought to return the book like it's trash or a piece of faulty equipment.

All that said, Breaking Dawn is hardly comparable to The Great Gatsby, no? And as far as I'm concerned, it could possibly be classified as faulty equipment since there seem to be so many issues and faults with the characterization and plot. (I actually have not read the book myself.)

Any opinions?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:04:00 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 8, 2008 9:10:48 AM PDT
Anthrophile says:
Alia, I admire your strong moral sense, and am thinking you're probably a pretty awesome person to know, but I also think you are allowing corporate America to take advantage of you.

If "real readers," as you say, are people who simply lie back and accept whatever in a "buyer beware" gambit, then the publishing companies have absolutely no incentive to TRY. No incentive to find anything new, authors who are innovative, and timely and brilliant. This is why we have mid-list authors who struggle to put out a good product shoved into the background for the latest twelve Laurell K. Hamilton clones who might not write WELL, but by jove at least they can write FAST. This is why the real innovators, people who are pushing the boundaries and perfecting their craft can't find buyers, because "It's really good! But our readers won't 'get' it, can you simplify it a little? Dumb it down?" This is the level of respect the vast majority of large publishers have for you. Why TAKE that? Why accept?

In a larger context this is why so much of pop culture all sounds and looks and reads exactly the same, why we have 16 Britney copycats and nineteen Scary Movie sequels, each worse than the last, with everything that was unique and creative sucked out. Sequels and remakes and subpar book adaptations, year after year after year. This is why there is little to no respect among large corporations for the average American consumer -- because we keep on proving that we want our horses beaten and dead, more and more and more of same as long as it's "safe." That we're willing to accept: "well, it was poor because of this that and the other thing, but tee-hee, who cares, it's just YA, it's just fiction, it's just fantasy!"

No. Just no. If we accept crap, crap is what we will get. Non-crap DOES exist, so there is no reason to accept crap. If we accept things thrown together in six months because we need a "fix," now now now, then shoddy craftsmanship is what we will get. When quality sells, publishers will produce quality, bookstores will stock quality, writers will produce quality -- they have to make a living and eat just like the rest of us, and will do exactly what produces a paycheck. They're not robber barons on the fringes of society tying to cheat us, nor are they the archangel doorkeepers who generously bestow the Gift of Art to the Masses from the goodness of their hearts. Let's not over-idealize (or over-demonize). It is a BUSINESS, it runs on the same principles of cause and effect as any other business: Produce what people want, and you can have enough money to buy supper and a home and maybe some nice extras.

A book is not just its paper and ink -- it is a service, an experience, and if the experience is sub-par, the providers need to know about it, because that is their JOB. (And no, it's not their job to provide the "best experience of my life" -- but then it's also not their job to provide offense, unhappiness and discontent either, y'know?)

After all, if a huge amount of people are unsatisfied with this book, isn't it better for Meyers and her people to know NOW, and take steps to mitigate this, rather than putting out more of the same? Yeah, it may be a blow in the short-term. But if a large portion of people who bought this book hate it but don't return it, just sit at home and silently sulk because "buyer beware!", so that on paper "Breaking Dawn" looks like a universal success, and then Meyers and her handlers then put lots of money, time, and effort into another similar work which just flops because the dissatisfied have secretly gone off Meyers and this time just don't buy in the first place -- well, what a waste! It's not good long-term business. Not for anyone.

It's feedback -- they need to know what's wrong, and money is the language that business speaks.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:08:53 AM PDT
Jennifer says:
It is just a book. I understand the need to tell the author and the publisher that what they put out is unacceptable. Sometimes the only way to get your point across is to hit them in the pocket book. They lose money when books are returned and people are warned off. I think anyone who bought it, and didn't like it has the right to get their money back. Most people spend quiet a lot at book stores, I for one never get out for under $50 when I go, and I have bought in to a member ship that gets me nearly 40% off when I buy.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:51:10 AM PDT
Monet says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:55:11 AM PDT
This isn't about punishing the bookstore (and really, they don't care, they'd rather have a happy customer who will return to buy more books rather than turn one away just because they didn't want to refund a book).

It's about letting the publisher and author know we were displeased, and there is only one way they listen these days: money.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:04:42 AM PDT
mountainman says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:15:08 AM PDT
Monet says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:20:05 AM PDT
If she wrote it for herself, she wouldn't have tried to get it published. As soon as she entered the publishing world, she stopped writing for herself.

You're still arguing that someone displeased with a product should just suck it up and live with it. That's not how our consumer-oriented society works these days. You're thinking in extremes.

Hell, I didn't even buy it. After Eclipse, I wasn't about to. I did borrow it, however, and I was more than eager to return it as soon as I could. If I had bought it, I would have returned it, because my $15 isn't going into Meyer's bank account. Not a penny of it.

I'll borrow a book and then buy it if I enjoyed it enough. I borrowed Ender's Game from my dad, and when I moved out I bought my own copy because I loved it that much. But Breaking Dawn isn't even 5% as awe-inspiring as Ender's Game. Not worth keeping or worth putting money into Meyer's pocket for something you didn't enjoy--especially for those who were eagerly expecting to love it as much as they loved the last three novels.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:26:30 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 8, 2008 10:27:19 AM PDT
Anthrophile says:
"Who cares if you're displeased? "

Big corporations' argument in a nutshell? =/

Again -- no. NO writer is doing their readers a "favor." (Nor vice versa.)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:34:38 AM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:44:43 AM PDT
kcnow says:
I deleted my last entry because it's just this simple -- It's a customers choice whether they want to return Breaking Dawn. I'm sorry if you don't like it but that's between them and the book store.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:48:49 AM PDT
aila yeatts--
wow, and you're telling us to get over ourselves...
no, meyer hasn't smashed the perfect little vampire mary sue world- she CREATED it in BD and it was a horrible one, too!
honestly, i never really cared about bella in the stories (and i know many readers who agree with me) because she was a whiny, immature, and annoying main character.
hm...hiding what the story was to me? what about the veil that made me realize that the story simply WAS: in your words, The Teen Equivalent To My Mother's Trashy Romance Novels. actually, i'd rather read my mom's trashy romances simply because the authors would have been true to their genre and made it an interesting - instead of TRAUMATIZING in BD's case - read.
real readers tell it like it is...you've been blinded by your own assumptions.
and i didn't get what i paid for. as a true fan, it wasn't entertainment to me - it was pure torture, thank you very much.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 11:34:41 AM PDT
seaglass says:
Monet, why are you so "appalled"? You should stop for a moment and consider--whether you agree with it or not--the very real phenomenon of thousands of fans being SO upset with this novel that books are actually being returned everywhere, and perfectly legally as well. When was the last time, if ever, this has happened with such a popular author? Think about it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 11:37:09 AM PDT
seaglass says:
Anthrophile, beautifully said.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 11:38:26 AM PDT
panda says:
Hmm......what can I say about this subject. Well, I see no reason why when you're dissatisfied with a product that you can't get your money back for it. Whether you return it or sell it and make your money back is up to each individual.
My problem would lie with the bookstore and what they intended to do with the book after it was returned. If they put it back on the shelf and try to re-sell it for full price, that would bother me, because I don't want to pay full price for something I think is brand spanking new and it turns out not to be. If they had a used book section, I think that would be okay. Then you know that someone else did own it, but you get a discounted price for it. I think that's fair.

What do bookstores do with returned merchandise anyway? If someone has answered this, I'm sorry, but right now, I don't have time to read through the whole thread.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 11:40:37 AM PDT
So long as it's in sellable condition, it goes back on the shelves. In fact, if the book is in any way damaged (bent spines, torn pages, scratches, writing inside, etc), they won't accept a return. (This is not speaking for defects. Those are not the same thing.)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 11:54:55 AM PDT
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Breaking Dawn Special Edition (The Twilight Saga) by Stephenie Meyer (Hardcover - August 4, 2009)
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