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University Physics with Modern Physics with MasteringPhysics (12th Edition) [Misc. Supplies]

by Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman, Lewis Ford
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)


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Book Description

March 23, 2007 080532187X 978-0805321876 12

Refining the most widely adopted and enduring physics text available, University Physics with Modern Physics, Twelfth Edition continues an unmatched history of innovation and careful execution that was established by the best selling Eleventh Edition. Assimilating the best ideas from education research, this new edition provides enhanced problem-solving instruction, pioneering visual and conceptual pedagogy, the first systematically enhanced problems, and the most pedagogically proven and widely used homework and tutorial system available. Mechanics, Waves/Acoustics, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Optics, Modern Physics. For all readers interested in university physics.

 

080532187X / 9780805321876 University Physics with Modern Physics with MasteringPhysics™

 

Package consists of

0321500288 / 9780321500281 MasteringPhysics™ with E-book Student Access Kit for University Physics

0321501217 / 9780321501219 University Physics with Modern Physics

 



Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hugh D. Young is Emeritus Professor of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. He attended Carnegie Mellon for both undergraduate and graduate study and earned his Ph.D. in fundamental particle theory under the direction of the late Richard Cutkosky. He joined the faculty of Carnegie Mellon in 1956 and has also spent two years as a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Prof. Young’s career has centered entirely around undergraduate education. He has written several undergraduate-level textbooks, and in 1973 he became a co-author with Francis Sears and Mark Zemansky for their well-known introductory texts. With their deaths, he assumed full responsibility for new editions of these books until joined by Prof. Freedman for University Physics.

 

Prof. Young is an enthusiastic skier, climber, and hiker. He also served for several years as Associate Organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Pittsburgh, and has played numerous organ recitals in the Pittsburgh area. Prof. Young and his wife Alice usually travel extensively in the summer, especially in Europe and in the desert canyon country of southern Utah.

 

Roger A. Freedman is a Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Freedman was an undergraduate at the University of California campuses in San Diego and Los Angeles, and did his doctoral research in nuclear theory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor J. Dirk Walecka. He came to UCSB in 1981 after three years teaching and doing research at the University of Washington.

 

At UCSB, Dr. Freedman has taught in both the Department of Physics and the College of Creative Studies, a branch of the university intended for highly gifted and motivated undergraduates. He has published research in nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, and laser physics. In recent years, he has helped to develop computer-based tools for learning introductory physics and astronomy. When not in the classroom or slaving over a computer, Dr. Freedman can be found either flying (he holds a commercial pilot’s license) or driving with his wife, Caroline, in their 1960 Nash Metropolitan convertible.

 

A. Lewis Ford is Professor of Physics at Texas A&M University. He received a B.A. from Rice University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972. After a one-year postdoc at Harvard University, he joined the Texas A&M physics faculty in 1973 and has been there ever since. Professor Ford’s research area is theoretical atomic physics, with a specialization in atomic collisions. At Texas A&M he has taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses, but primarily introductory physics.


Product Details

  • Misc. Supplies: 1632 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 12 edition (March 23, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080532187X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805321876
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.8 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #162,270 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
97 of 98 people found the following review helpful
Format:Misc. Supplies|Verified Purchase
The book is extremely well done, and this being the 12th edition this should be no surprise. The explanations of the concepts are good enough, but the real strengths of the book lie in the well-done figures, in the generous number of thoroughly explained numerical examples, and in the well thought-out problem sets at the end of each chapter. If you use this book along with the Schaum's Outline of College Physics you should have as easy a time as is possible with the subject matter.

Now for what is not so good, which lies entirely in the cynical marketing strategy. I have compared the 12th edition to the 11th, and I cannot find one additional subject or chapter or even one that has been deleted. The two books seem to have identical subject matter, and that is saying quite a bit for two 1700 plus page textbooks that are supposed to be different editions. So what is different? From the publisher's own information, the difference seems to be in revised exercises, revised drawings, added sketches to worked examples, added goals at the beginning of each chapter, and other such minutia. Hardly the stuff that new editions should be made of considering the price tag. The final ploy, just to insure that the poor students are "locked into" buying a new book is the concept of the student access kit that comes with each book and acts as a personal tutor to the student. But here's the catch - once one student has opened it and used it, it is useless to any other student. So much for reselling your textbook at the end of the semester. Normally I would take off at least two stars for such blatant highway robbery, but the book is so artfully done I just can't find it in myself to do so. The following is the table of contents:

MECHANICS
1. Units, Physical Quantities, and Vectors
2.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better Physics Textbook December 21, 2007
Format:Misc. Supplies|Verified Purchase
Young and Freedman's is much better than Halliday's. While Halliday's are problem oriented approach which teaches concepts through problems solving. Serway's is similar to Young and Freedman and explains concepts well, but it doesn't have as many difficult problems as YF. I read both the 11th and 12th Edition. They have basically the same content. Even the 9th Edition doesn't differ much from this new freshly out of oven book. Problem arrangement is pretty much the same for all the edition with some additional problems and slightly modified arrangement. I bought the older 9th edition for my class this past semester. It went well. Our problem assignments are not from the textbook. Moreover, the library has a reserved copy. I used that for reference to the textbook problems.
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53 of 61 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Good material, VERY poor quality September 9, 2008
By Mr. P
Format:Misc. Supplies
The University Physics is pretty much the standard for college physics, but I think that they have really dropped the ball with this edition.
The material is very clear with lots of good illustrations, making the book very easy to self-study.
However, the quality of the book is terrible! Here are the things that my physics class learned to hate about it after the second semester:

-VERY heavy! The book weighs almost 10 lbs! Even on my small campus, I got tired of lugging that book around.

-BAD Binding. If you want to keep the book in good condition, don't plan on carrying it in a backpack. After halfway into the second semester, the books started falling apart--the binding wasn't strong enough to support the weight of the book.

-SMEARING Ink. I regularly check the answers in the back of the book, but after about a month the ink began to smear because I would flip back at the same spot multiple times.

-WRONG Answers: Many people have noticed that the answers in the back to the odd-numbered problems are wrong. Our professor started getting in the habit of assigning our homework on the board, then writing down the correct answers below. I would think that this, being the 12TH EDITION, would have fixed all those kinks!

So my advice: Don't buy the book unless you have to--wait until the next edition comes out. I wouldn't try to buy it used either, because I think the quality of the book would only allow it to last long enough for one student.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST physics textbook for its value April 19, 2010
Format:Misc. Supplies|Verified Purchase
This book deserves an ovation for its quality, for its assumption that the reader is intelligent and for its beautiful, clear explanations supplemented by colorful and helpful diagrams and examples. I can find no flaws with this book, either with its organization or its mathematical conventions, other than neglecting electric flux density and pure magnetic field altogether, but they are trivial. It places a heavy (but due) emphasis on vector intuition and notation, which is a great foundation for all physics. If you found the book too hard, then that's good because you learn more from a slightly challenging textbook than one that involves no vectors, no calculus based explanation and no challenging-to-impossible chapter problems. I have used this for many other classes, including particle physics, relativity, and semiconductors because its explanations and intuitive references are way better than any other book. It will probably be on my shelf forever, and is definitely worth way more than the value.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Confusing, overwhelming, but not horrible April 12, 2009
Format:Misc. Supplies
There are a couple of things I appreciate about this book; namely, the authors have a semi-comical, lighthearted tone about the subject matter. This makes the writing bearable.

Attempting to learn from the book itself, however, is like drinking from a firehose. First off, you're overwhelmed with visuals. Maybe I just have a bad case of ADHD, but the fact that any given page will contain at least 4 pictures and 3 disparate segments of content completely overwhelms me. Showing a picture of a race car does not at all help me learn about momentum, okay? Reading the book is, at best, like learning from a roadside billboard and, at worst, like starring into a flashlight. It's obvious that the authors wanted to create a visually engaging experience, but my god, it's hard to focus when your senses are being bombarded with so much peripheral information. Printing the damn thing in black and white would be a step in the right direction, and it'd probably save a few bucks too.

Another annoying aspect about this book is the ISEE method that permeates the example problems; the authors' pet method for going about solving presented problems tends to obfuscate the examples and take away from any cohesion that the answers create. Besides, anyone who's taking university level physics should not need a problem solving framework to get them through mechanics, it just serves as an unnecessary barrier to the information for those of us who don't think in the ISEE format.

Basically, my unified complaint is that in an attempt to present a helluva lot of material in a stimulating way, the authors trip over themselves. I'm a fairly diligent student, but often while reading this textbook I'll ask myself, "okay, what did I just read?
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!
All I have to say is "excellent"! The course is really much interesting. It worth each cent you spend on it.
Published 11 months ago by eusbarbosa
1.0 out of 5 stars Time for a change
I have yet to write a review for a text book, however having been stuck with this book for my required physics courses I felt it appropriate to comment. Read more
Published 14 months ago by Carlos Fernandez
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Text
I used this text for 3 semesters. Now I am studying upper division Mechanical Engineering. This book is still on my bookshelf and is an easy reference tool. Read more
Published 18 months ago by Mr Cavooter
2.0 out of 5 stars Wasn't in the shape I expected
Binding was cracked and product was listed as good and in my opinion is fair. There should have been more of a description other than "good". Read more
Published on September 24, 2011 by ES
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Helpful
This book is a pretty easy read. It also has fantastic countless diagrams and drawings of what the book is talking about. Read more
Published on August 4, 2011 by Greg
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book
This is a good book but honestly i feel like it might fall apart because of how big the thing is. I don't carry it from class to class because i'm not required to, but even if i... Read more
Published on September 19, 2010 by iknowiknow
5.0 out of 5 stars University Physics Book
The book i ordered was in great shape. still in the package. new, just like promised. And i got the code for the online course that i didnt know i needed until after i ordered the... Read more
Published on September 1, 2010 by Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars A good physics textbook.
University Physics was the required textbook for Physics I & II. The book does a good job of explaining the physics and the mathematics behind it, although it can be verbose at... Read more
Published on January 22, 2010 by sciencestudent
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Buy!
I was not looking forward to buying my Physics textbook for college because I heard the prices were outrageous! Read more
Published on January 17, 2010 by Julietta Gomez
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Writing. Too Many Mistakes. Black & White Illustration
I found the writing and coverage of the material a little more clear and easy to read and understand than another similar physics textbook that I'm using. That's a big plus. Read more
Published on January 16, 2010 by Heavy Reader
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