Buy Used
$4.34
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Item qualifies for FREE shipping and Prime! This item is used.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Unjust Enrichment Hardcover – December 1, 2000


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.29 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books (December 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811718441
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811718448
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,454,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In September 1999, some 500 American WWII veterans filed suit against five Japanese corporations (including Mitsubishi and Kawasaki), seeking reparation for having been used as slave laborers during the war. According to the plaintiffs, these corporations built their postwar success on a foundation of American forced labor. The companies say they have been wrongly targeted, because the modern conglomerates have no relation to the wartime entities accused of these practices, prohibited now as then under the rules of the Geneva Convention. Holmes (4,000 Bowls of Rice), a respected historian and researcher who is part of a presidential panel working to declassify the records of Nazi war crimes, weighs in heavily on the side of the former American POWs. Using recently declassified documents, Holmes bolsters the vets' claims. (One formerly top secret Japanese cable read, "Due to a serious shortage of labor power in Japan, the use of the white POW is earnestly desired.") But the most emotionally charged evidence comes from the former POWs themselves. In interview after interview, Holmes chronicles the abuse of American captives, whose lingering medical and emotional problems are compounded by the belief that their suffering has been minimized by a postwar culture more moved by the plight of other groups of war victims. (Feb. 19) Forecast: A front-page New York Times article on October 2, 2000, broke news of the case on a national level. This book provides a foundation for further media coverage, and should be widely cited. Meanwhile, buffs and vets will find out about the book via newsgroups and the like.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The opening battles of World War II brought the Japanese a significant number of American prisoners of war, a prize composed of some 26,000 captured military and 14,000 interned civilians. For the most part, these prisoners were treated badly, and a disproportionate number died or suffered lifelong disabilities. This is scarcely news. Holmes claims to bring to the table newly released information about the roles of the zaibatsus, the great industrial combines, in the use of forced labor. She also has located information relating to the State Department decision not to prosecute the companies or their leaders after the war, although numerous camp commandants and guards were treated as war criminals. In contrast to recent payments by various European corporations, notes Holmes, no compensation has been paid by Japanese companies. She asserts but does not convincingly prove that many successful Japanese companies, such as Mitsubishi, succeeded in the postwar era because of the unreasonable profits they reaped by using slave labor, a large part of which was American. Given the scale of the war, the immense destruction on the home islands, and the generally low productivity of forced labor, it is difficult to see this one factor as paramount in the rebuilding of Japanese industrial strength. Libraries collecting deeply in Japanese-American relations and World War II history may be interested. Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
3
3 star
2
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
Linda Goetzs books have helped me fill in some of the gaps.
Linda Anderson
She did not give the Japanese an opportunity to speak and just wanted to hammer home how terrible they were to POWs, which they were, by the way, but not all.
William H.
A book such as this undoubtedly angers some and disturbs others but educates all that are willing to look at what can be for many, an uncomfortable truth.
Steven George Bustin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Mark B. Golden on February 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I always knew of the atrocities set upon the world by the Nazis in WWll. I knew there were prisoners of war in the Pacific. I did not know that 9 out of every 10 prisoners of war who died in captivity, died due to Japanese hands. I did not know that "white" prisoners of war were sold into slave labor to the major corporations in Japan. I now know that the companies we Americans helped to rebuild after the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, have yet to apologize to us for the treatment the prisoners received. I read. I learned. I learned that until apologies come forth, I will not support Japanese companies in any way. While it is true that the people running the companies now were probably not even born yet, it would honor the memories of their ancestors, if an apology came forth. The honor would come back with honesty, and maybe their grandfathers' souls can rest.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Roderick C. Hall on April 22, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating book about a chapter of our WW II experience that should have been told before now. Our prisoners in the Pacific were inhumanely treated, and we owe it to them to hear how they suffered, and to help them get compensation. German companies are coming forward to pay for the slave labor they used during WW II. It is about time that our men in the Pacific also received compensation for their work and suffering.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William H. on June 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found that the author knew her material well but I thought she required more sources or personal interviews than she actually used within the text. She did not give the Japanese an opportunity to speak and just wanted to hammer home how terrible they were to POWs, which they were, by the way, but not all. It was well organized and well written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Terrence Murrell Mark Jr on July 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The events of this book were some of the most horrific from World War II and to wait this long to tell me them was a crime in itself. How could this nation have let this happen, I pray these men will forgive their peers and superiors for this unjust act. We should boycott this industries as a nation and show our soladarity with those brave men who endure almost 3 years of brutality at the hands of our enemy at the time.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gary l miller on April 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
American politicians are the lowest of the low!!
this book is well written & referenced,
Linda Goetz tells all in this politically incorrect book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Linda Anderson on April 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My father died in 1983 of service connected problems of Bataan Death March and being a prisoner for 3 1/2 years. He rarely spoke of the war. Linda Goetzs books have helped me fill in some of the gaps. We must never forget these men who sacrificed everything for us to be FREE !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Walter W. Ko on April 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book in journalistic research on how Japan in WW II used American POWs to enrich themselves. The Imperial Army took their blood, tears and dignity. Only a few brave endured the torture and hardship and survived to come back to share their horror. The Bataan Death March of "no papa, no mama and no Uncle Sam" was the beginning of a long dark chapter. Shockingly, they kept their mouth closed until Linda shared the story of atrocities.

This fall will be 60th anniversary of San Francisco Peace Treaty and our WWII Greatest Generation is fading at a rate 1500 a day. Linda did a good job in pointing out the faults of this Peace Treaty. We owe our peace and freedom to them for their sacrifice. We need to carry the torch for humanity and justice to demand from Japan government for the apology and dignity of the team of GI Joe.

Linda did a good job in supporting our veterans with a good documentary in history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven George Bustin on January 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A book such as this undoubtedly angers some and disturbs others but educates all that are willing to look at what can be for many, an uncomfortable truth. This is not simply the story of POWs being used by the host nation as a labor source, as all nations essentially did that in WWII. And this is not simply an issue of the cruelty of the Japanese military in dealing with Allied POWs and civilians, that too is well documented and accepted. This book stands out because it addresses the comprehensive and systemic system of Japanese abuse of Allied POWs for the direct benefit of Japanese companies, benefits that carried neatly and powerfully into Post-War Japan. Author Holmes does an excellent job of telling individual stories in the greater criminal context of the plans and execution of both Japanese industry and the Japanese government. This is a powerful and disturbing book, as well-written books addressing the truth often are, but is also an engaging and incredibly informative work that explains, educates and even begins to heal those involved. A must read for serious historians and those interested in WWII.
Steven Bustin, Author: Humble Heroes, How The USS Nashville CL43 Fought WWII Humble Heroes: How the USS Nashville Fought WWII
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search